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Drought Reinforcing Drought in the U.S. Southern Plains. Gulf Oil Spill 2010: Health & Safety Overview. Calling all voices for clean energy + oil company accountability! Photo: Scented_Mirror My husband and I were in marital therapy the other day (yes, we go to marital therapy).

Calling all voices for clean energy + oil company accountability!

It’s where my husband and I actually talk. There’s a certain safety about saying what’s on our mind about what’s bothering us, where we’re stuck, etc. in the presence of a “mediator.” If the other becomes defensive, I can guarantee that the therapist will call it out and dig deeper into the why’s and wherefore’s. The situation gets defused and we’re able to move closer to understanding each other. I get called out on talking from my head instead of my heart all the time. Our biggest problem tends to be lack of communication. We agree on one thing fo sho: if our therapist could just move in with us, we’d be in fantastic shape!

Anyway, the therapist asked both of us what would make us feel safe so that we could talk ”like this” without her present. Is there an app for that? The room burst open with laughter. And here I thought I was sooooo clever. My take: Same as above. [youtube. Antonia Juhasz: BP's "Missing Oil" Washes Up in St. Mary's Parish, LA. This is a rush transcript.

Antonia Juhasz: BP's "Missing Oil" Washes Up in St. Mary's Parish, LA

Copy may not be in its final form. AMY GOODMAN: Antonia Juhasz is also with us in Washington, DC, author of The Tyranny of Oil. You have just come back from the Gulf of Mexico. You’re writing a book on what’s happened there, Antonia. Can you talk about what you found in the Gulf, in St. ANTONIA JUHASZ: Yeah. And then I, the next day, went out with him, and we spent five hours going along the coast of Oyster Bayou to Taylor Bayou in his boat, and what I saw was oil, waves of oil that had washed in.

And this is also completely out of whack with what BP had been doing previously, in my experience, which is, wherever you saw oil, there wasn’t far behind a BP cleanup crew that would clean it up. AMY GOODMAN: Antonia Juhasz, you’re in Washington, DC, up from the Gulf of Mexico, because the Senate is expected to take up energy spill legislation today. ANTONIA JUHASZ: Well, they’re not, so — what was supposed to happen was two waves of legislation. Environmental Activist Jerry Cope on "The Crime of the Century: What BP and US Government Don't Want You to Know" This is a rush transcript.

Environmental Activist Jerry Cope on "The Crime of the Century: What BP and US Government Don't Want You to Know"

Copy may not be in its final form. AMY GOODMAN: BP has announced its latest attempt to seal the largest oil spill in US history once and for all appears to be working. Dubbed "static kill," the operation forces a heavy, synthetic fluid called drilling mud down into the well. BP said today pressure in the well appears to be stabilizing. A seventy-five-ton cap placed on the well last month has contained the oil, but it’s considered a temporary measure. Retired Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen, who’s coordinating the Obama administration’s response to the oil spill disaster, said static kill alone is not enough to plug the well. THAD ALLEN: The relief wells are the answer. AMY GOODMAN: Well, ever since BP placed a temporary cap on the well last month, the media has been abuzz with reports of how the oil has largely disappeared from the surface of the Gulf of Mexico.

And joining us from New Orleans is environmentalist Jerry Cope. We welcome you both to Democracy Now! Oil spill dispersant could damage coral populations - environment - 03 August 2010. Coral populations in the Gulf of Mexico could fall because of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig disaster – from contact not with oil but with the dispersant that's supposed to get rid of it.

Oil spill dispersant could damage coral populations - environment - 03 August 2010

Laboratory tests suggest that Corexit 9500A, the dispersant used by BP to tackle the largest offshore oil spill in US history, stops coral larvae latching onto the surfaces where they usually mature. The larvae, often the size of a pinhead, float in the sea before latching onto surfaces such as rocks on the sea floor, cliff faces or old oil rigs. It takes hundreds of years for a mature colony to develop.

Researchers at Mote Marine Laboratory in Summerland Key, Florida, studied how larvae of shallow-water Mustard Hill corals (Porites astreoides) settled onto cement discs in three different combinations of liquids: seawater and oil, seawater and Corexit 9500A, and a combination of all three. The team observed the larvae for 48 hours, which is around the time it takes for most coral larvae to settle. Breaking news - COREXIT fears destroying eco-system Being realized by MAINSTREAM NEWS!