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Laura-Beth Corfield

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Founder of Zara fashion chain overtakes Bill Gates to become world's richest man. The Spanish founder of the Zara fashion chain has overtaken Bill Gates to become the world's richest man.

Founder of Zara fashion chain overtakes Bill Gates to become world's richest man

Amancio Ortega's personal fortune leapt by $1.7billion this week to $79.5billion - taking the Inditex owner past the Microsoft co-founder's estimated $78.5billion. Already Europe's richest man, the 80-year-old - whose glamorous daughter Marta is expected to take over management of the business - now tops the global list. Scroll down for video Amancio Ortega, the Spanish founder of the Zara fashion chain, has overtaken Bill Gates to become the world's richest man. He is pictured with his daughter, Marta Ortega's personal fortune leapt by $1.7billion this week to $79.5billion - taking the entrepreneur past the Microsoft co-founder's estimated $78.5billion Marta Ortega has undergone training at the firm, including stacking shelves when she was younger Ortega - whose firm Inditex is the parent company to Zara, Massimo Dutti and Pull&Bear - is seen relaxing on his yacht Loaded: 0% Progress: 0%

Funding, students and staff: What Brexit could cost our universities. Russian mink farms where thousands are slaughtered and left to rot to make $1... These disturbing pictures expose the macabre truth about the fur farms in Russia and China which supply the fashion market in the world's leading cities, including London, Paris and New York.

Russian mink farms where thousands are slaughtered and left to rot to make $1...

Across ten time zones, the images show the reality of mink and sable gulags - many set up during the harsh Communist past - where prized animals are bred for slaughter, bringing in millions of pounds to the Russian economy every single year. An investigation by MailOnline also reveals the appalling conditions in which wild animals, including different types of fox, are captured and killed, from being skinned alive to being poisoned by the faeces in the air, and reveals the heartless farm owners who can't see beyond their profits.

And there are certainly profits to be made: a sable 'blanket' sold for a record-breaking $900,000 to a royal just a few years ago, while a coat at last year's Fendi show was rumoured to have a price tag of $1.2million. Animals forced to suffer and starve in Russian fur farm. Hermes PETA Birkin Bag Update. 14 September 2015 Scarlett Conlon JANE BIRKIN "is satisfied by the measures taken by Hermès", according to the brand, following an investigation by the fashion house into claims made by PETA that its famous Birkin bags were being "constructed from the skins of factory-farmed and cruelly slaughtered crocodiles".

Hermes PETA Birkin Bag Update

"Following the heartfelt emotion expressed by Jane Birkin and her request for explanation, Hermès, in agreement with her, reiterates its firm commitment in the ethical treatment of crocodiles in its partner farms," read a statement from the brand, which went on to explain that it had demanded that all of its suppliers comply with the Best Management Practices for Louisiana Alligator Farming document. It also stated that it continues to ensure "good practices for farming, procedures for slaughter, environmental management, social conditions of employees and the security of work conditions and infrastructures.

" Why Fur Is Back in Fashion. This story appears in the September 2016 issue of National Geographic magazine.

Why Fur Is Back in Fashion

It was frozen-toe, mid-February, north-country cold, under a cloudless sky, sun glinting off fresh snow. We were tromping out onto a wetland frozen nine inches deep. It felt like how the fur trade began, someplace long ago, far away. Bill Mackowski, in his 60th year of trapping, mostly around northern Maine, pointed out some alder branches sticking through the ice. Beavers start collecting poplar after the first cold snap, he explained, then pile on inedible alder to weigh down the poplar below the ice, where they eat it throughout the winter.

Breaking through the ice in another spot, Mackowski said, “Did you hear those air bubbles?” “That’s what we call a superblanket,” said Mackowski. In truth, getting past the killing doesn’t seem like much of an issue anymore. But you hardly need the numbers. So how has fur made such a comeback from the intense social ostracism of the 1990s?