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What’s the password? Arduino + Keypad. Keypads are everywhere; on your cellphone, on your TV remotes, on your stereo and now on your Arduino. Wait…. Why do you want a keypad on your Arduino? Well it’s a pretty useful device to input numbers and letters (example: telephones), it can also be used for security measures like a keypad door lock, and it’s prefect when you need a low-cost and accessible interface for your next idea. After all, It wouldn’t be practical to use a single button or a potentiometer to input your Pin on an ATM. So for this tutorial, we will be going over Sparkfun’s 12 buttons keypad (0-9, #, * ), and get you all set up with some code and schematic too.

The buttons on this particular keypad are setup in a 3X4 matrix format so we only need 7 pins to detect the pressing of 12 keys. For example, when you hit the number 3 pins 5&2 are connected, 6 connects pins 5&7 and 9 connects 5&6. Hooking it up So this wiring example looks really confusing, but it’s not. Code For this tutorial we have 2 Arduino projects. KeypadTutorial. Matrix Keypad library This page last updated September 04, 2013, at 11:42 AM by gratefulfrog This tutorial is based upon theMatrix Keypad library Navigation What is it? The Keypad library allows your Arduino to read a matrix type keypad.

Download latest(This includes four example sketches.) Identifying the keypad pins First you need to get a piece of paper and draw the right hand diagram as you see it below. Procedure Connect your Ohm meter leads to pins 1 and 2. Notes on using the library The library is non-blocking which means you can press and hold the key all day long and your Arduino will continue processing the rest of your code. Example Troubleshooting 1. 2. 3. Modifying the library The library supports user defined pins and keymaps so it should not be necessary to change the library. More information on using and creating libraries. Yet another laser cutter. When my EPSON 830U decided not to work for me anymore (printing heads clogged) I thought I could make some use of the still working mechanics of the printer. It's based on a couple of stepper motors for both axis of motion (print head and paper feed).

So I replaced the original power supply and drive electronics for an arduino board and an stepper motor driver from Adafruit industries. Now I could move the printhead anywhere on a page. Next step was to add a laser on the printhead and to control it using a PWM output from arduino (so laser power could be modulated from the computer). Though it only cut thin back color cardboard, it has may uses. Data format is very simple: each line contains a sequence of integer numbers separated by blank space. If you have an old EPSON printer, you may want to give it a second thought before putting it to the trash. Video was shot by taping an iPod to the printer's head. 0. Motivation When I bought such a motor control shield recently, it came as a kit without any instructions. I could find the circuit diagram and list of parts on the Internet after some searching, but almost nothing on assembly and how to control it.

Therefore I decided to create this page to share with the community what I learned so far. Official Documentation Connections Connection strip J3 (upper left, to Arduino; from left to right) 8 NC Not Connected 7 GND ↔ Arduino-GND 6 DIRB ↔ Arduino-13 Controls motor direction resp. activity for MOTORS 1 and 2 (LOW 1, HIGH 2) 5 DIRA ↔ Arduino-12 Controls motor direction resp. activity for MOTORS 3 und 4 (LOW 3, HIGH 4) 4 PWMB ↔ Arduino-11 Controls activity motor 3-4 3 PWMA ↔ Arduino-10 Connects activity motor 1-2 2 E2 ↔ Arduino-9 (Stepper mode: Connected to IC3 1A) 1 E1 ↔ Arduino-8 (Stepper mode: Connected to IC3 4A) Connection strip ENCODER (upper right, to Arduino) Connection strip STEPPER Motor/Device Control.

Adafruit Learning System. Difficulty: Difficult. My older son recently started school and needed his own desk for doing homework. I wanted to make something nicer than a simple tabletop with legs, and realized that I could also build in a bit of fun for when the homework is finished. Both my boys and I still had space travel on our minds from our summer trip to Kennedy Space Center. For this desk project, I decided to go with a NASA theme. I researched the Apollo Program as well as NASA's Mission Control Center, and designed my own console roughly based on those. I say "roughly" because the actual Mission Control does more monitoring than controlling, and isn't awash in the whiz-bang rocket noises young kids appreciate.

I took great liberties and made more of a "space-themed" play console than an accurate simulator. The desk resides under my son's loft bed (which I also built), and stays closed until the homework is finished: When playtime begins, the lid flips up to reveal the Mission Control console: Difficulty: Moderate. My older son recently started school and needed his own desk for doing homework. I wanted to make something nicer than a simple tabletop with legs, and realized that I could also build in a bit of fun for when the homework is finished. Both my boys and I still had space travel on our minds from our summer trip to Kennedy Space Center. For this desk project, I decided to go with a NASA theme.

I researched the Apollo Program as well as NASA's Mission Control Center, and designed my own console roughly based on those. The desk resides under my son's loft bed (which I also built), and stays closed until the homework is finished: When playtime begins, the lid flips up to reveal the Mission Control console: As I mentioned in the video, I painted the underside of the lid with magnetic primer. The programming of the console, which I posted to GitHub, has the Arduino and the Raspberry Pi working cooperatively. The CAPCOM panel has connections for the headset as well as volume controls. Difficulty: Easy. My older son recently started school and needed his own desk for doing homework. I wanted to make something nicer than a simple tabletop with legs, and realized that I could also build in a bit of fun for when the homework is finished. Both my boys and I still had space travel on our minds from our summer trip to Kennedy Space Center.

For this desk project, I decided to go with a NASA theme. I researched the Apollo Program as well as NASA's Mission Control Center, and designed my own console roughly based on those. I say "roughly" because the actual Mission Control does more monitoring than controlling, and isn't awash in the whiz-bang rocket noises young kids appreciate. I took great liberties and made more of a "space-themed" play console than an accurate simulator. My goal was simply to provide some extra ideas and sound effects for my two sons to play "space" together. The desk resides under my son's loft bed (which I also built), and stays closed until the homework is finished:

Difficulty: Easy. Control a Servo with a Force-Sensitive Resistor. Aquaponics – Online Temperature and Humidity. This project is a part of the Arduino Data Acquisition and Control System described in the upcoming book Automating Aquaponics with Arduino. You can see a live version of this tutorial here: While this project is designed with aquaponics in mind, it does not require an aquaponic system, making it useful for other projects such as home automation. The included application is, therefore, bare-bones, making it easier to integrate into any other App Engine project. How It Works Every sixty seconds, the Arduino will test its connection to App Engine. On startup, the web browser (client) will create a temperature and humidity gauge with values at zero.

Software Versions: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Update I removed the dependency on the Timer library – it simply wasn’t needed for this application. The Arduino code has been updated. For whatever reason, the Arduino fails to connect on the third HTMLRequest. Finally, I have the serial output on by default. Aquaponics – Online Temperature and Humidity. RGB Liquid Crystal Display Tutorial. Step #2: PrevNext Now we will prepare everything to start connecting to the Arduino. Insert the display into the breadboard with the pot next to it. Then connect 5V and GND to the breadboard rails as I have done. Good. Step #5: Connect pin 15 to 5V and then connect either pin 16, 17, or 18 to GND depending on what color you want for your backlight.

Step #8: Now you have connected the display to the Arduino. Step #9: If you got everything right, this is how it should look. Charlieplexing LEDs with an AVR ATmega328 (or Arduino) Charlieplexing is an ingenius method for controlling many LEDs without using many microcontroller pins. You can turn on or off one LED at a time. To light more than one LED at a time, you can scan the LEDs by turning a sequence of them on and off really fast. The number of LEDs you can control is determined by this formula: N pins * (N pins – 1). For example, if you have 4 pins, you can control 12 LEDs (4 pins * 3 pins). If you have 2 pins, you can control two LEDs, which makes it a little silly to employ Charlieplexing, since you could simply connect each LED to an MCU pin and then to ground. Charlieplexing makes more sense for more than two LEDs. Here is an ATmega328 on a custom PCB controlling 20 LEDs (the 21st is on its own pins) with just 5 pins: Charlieplexing takes advantage of the fact that LEDs are diodes: Current flows in only one direction through an LED.

The ATmega328 pins can source upwards of 40 mA. I’ll walk you through connecting 12 LEDs to four pins on your Arduino. Secret-Knock Gumball Machine. One of the best things about exhibiting at Maker Faire is giving attendees a challenge. For the 2010 Maker Faire Bay Area, I decided to combine a past project of mine, a door lock that opens only when you give a secret knock, with a standard crowd pleaser: candy. The result was this Secret-Knock Gumball Machine, which tempted and tested the crowds at Maker Faire to guess the right rhythm and receive a treat. Since the knock was not terribly secret (I happily handed out hints), it distributed hundreds of gumballs over the event’s two days. The “secret” knock defaults to the famous “Shave and a Haircut” rhythm, but you can program custom knocks by simply pressing a button and knocking a new pattern.

Inside the machine, a piezo sensor picks up sounds from the front knock panel, while an Arduino microcontroller recognizes the target pattern and controls a servo-driven gumball-dispensing wheel. Downloadable files MAKE: Amends. Arduino Parts & Kits Online Melbourne, Buy Microcontroller Boards, Arduino Electronic Components - Welcome. Arduino Projects. Arduino projects. Practical Arduino: News.

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