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With Judge Analytics, Ravel Law Starts To Judge The Judges. From murder and terrorism to patent conflicts and sexual discrimination lawsuits, courtrooms are home to some of the most important dramas in our society.

With Judge Analytics, Ravel Law Starts To Judge The Judges

While our top retailers can identify people who are pregnant weeks before even the consumer has realized it themselves, lawyers continue to argue cases before judges with data based on a handful of anecdotes from other attorneys. Ravel Law hopes to bring some big data magic to the courtroom, and perhaps improve our justice system along the way. The startup launched their Judge Analytics platform today. The idea is to provide comprehensive insights on every judge in the country, allowing lawyers to research the best strategies for their client before they file a lawsuit or argue a motion before a judge. HLS Students Recommend Ravel, Talk Research. The legal frog is comfortably numb. Lawyers are in danger of being slowly brought to the boil by technology, writes Norton Rose Fulbright partner Nick Abrahams.

The legal frog is comfortably numb

Lawyers are in danger of being slowly brought to the boil by technology, writes Norton Rose Fulbright partner Nick Abrahams. Everything is being disrupted by technology – media, retailing, consulting and now law. The response from most lawyers is “it won’t happen to us, what we do is different”. They are, like the frog in pot that is slowly being brought to the boil, comfortably numb but technology will boil them – and faster than anyone thinks. Harvard digitising 40 million pages of case law for free access. Harvard University is digitising nearly 40 million case law pages to ultimately give everyone access to the collection for free through the internet.

Harvard digitising 40 million pages of case law for free access

“We're all bound by the law,” Adam Ziegler, managing director of the Library Innovation Lab at Harvard, told WBUR’s BostonomiX blog. “We're all bound by the decisions that judges issue, we ought to be able to read them, and we ought not have to pay to read them.” Harvard Law’s collection is vast and comprehensive. It has about 43,000 case law books and Ziegler and his team estimate each book has 921 pages. The oldest decision dates back to Rhode Island's Court of Trials circa 1647, the Boston NPR station noted. The Latest Advances in Big Data Law and Analytics. A New Way to Look at Law, With Data Viz and Machine Learning. On TV, being a lawyer is all about dazzling jurors with verbal pyrotechnics.

A New Way to Look at Law, With Data Viz and Machine Learning

But for many lawyers–especially young ones–the job is about research. Long, dry, tedious research. It’s that less glamorous side of the profession that Daniel Lewis and Nik Reed are trying to upend with Ravel. Using data visualization, language analysis, and machine learning, the Stanford Law grads are aiming to reinvent legal research–and perhaps give young lawyers a deeper understanding of their field in the process. Lawyers have long relied on subscription services like LexisNexis and WestLaw to do their jobs. Harvard Is Offering Its Entire Collection Of U.S. Case Law To The Internet - BuzzFeed News.

Daniel Lewis (Ravel Law) on Judge Analytics. Announcing The Caselaw Access Project. Home - Ravel Law.