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Awaken the Mind

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The best relationship advice you'll ever get, what cognitive science reveals about the perfect daily routine and the psychology of writing, and more. Hey kara! If you missed last week's edition – Werner Herzog on creativity and making a living of doing what you love, Tolstoy's letters to Gandhi on why we hurt each other, Maya Angelou on courage and facing evil, and more – you can catch up right here. And if you're enjoying this, please consider supporting with a modest donation – every little bit helps, and comes enormously appreciated.

The Psychology of Writing and the Cognitive Science of the Perfect Daily Routine Reflecting on the ritualization of creativity, Bukowski famously scoffed that "air and light and time and space have nothing to do with. " Samuel Johnson similarly contended that "a man may write at any time, if he will set himself doggedly to it.

" And yet some of history's most successful and prolific writers were women and men of religious daily routines and odd creative rituals. (Even Buk himself ended up sticking to a peculiar daily routine.) Wendy MacNaughton for Brain Pickings Darwin's Battle with Anxiety Stossel writes: Jack Kerouac on kindness, the self illusion, and the "Golden Eternity," Salvador Dalí's eccentric life illustrated, Vonnegut on belonging, and more. Hey kara! If you missed last week's edition – C.S. Lewis on what free will really means, a children's book that helps kids deal with losing a loved one, Jeanette Winterson on reading and the power of art, and more – you can catch up right here.

And if you're enjoying this, please consider supporting with a modest donation – every little bit helps, and comes enormously appreciated. Jack Kerouac on Kindness, the Self Illusion, and the "Golden Eternity" In the mid-1950s, literary iconoclast and beat icon Jack Kerouac (March 12, 1922–October 21, 1969) became intensely interested in Buddhism, which began permeating his writing. Kerouac sent one such letter to his first wife, Edie Kerouac Parker, in late January of 1957, a decade after their marriage had been annulled. Kerouac writes: I have lots of things to teach you now, in case we ever meet, concerning the message that was transmitted to me under a pine tree in North Carolina on a cold winter moonlit night. How to find yourself, Leonard Cohen on creativity and hard work, the art of self-renewal, and more.

Hey kara! If you missed last week's edition – Buddhist economics, the best illustrations from 150 years of Alice in Wonderland, Chinua Achebe on the meaning of life, Bowie answers the Proust Questionnaire, and more – you can catch up right here. And if you're enjoying this, please consider supporting with a modest donation – every little bit helps, and comes enormously appreciated. Leonard Cohen on Creativity, Hard Work, and Why You Should Never Quit Before You Know What It Is You're Quitting Canadian singer-songwriter, poet, and novelist Leonard Cohen (b.

September 21, 1934) is among the most exhilarating creative spirits of the past century. Recipient of the prestigious Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award and countless other accolades, and an ordained Rinzai Buddhist monk, his music has extended popular song into the realm of poetry, even philosophy. There are always meaningful songs for somebody. I'm writing all the time.

He later adds: It has a certain nourishment. How to Find Yourself. Rebecca Solnit on how getting lost helps us find ourselves, a guide for the perplexed, the quest to integrate wonder and wisdom, and more. Hey kara! If you missed last week's edition – Jack Kerouac on kindness, the self illusion, and the "Golden Eternity," Salvador Dalí's eccentric and extravagant life illustrated, Vonnegut on belonging and hate, and more – you can catch up right here. And if you're enjoying this, please consider supporting with a modest donation – every little bit helps, and comes enormously appreciated. A Field Guide to Getting Lost: Rebecca Solnit on How We Find Ourselves "On how one orients himself to the moment," Henry Miller wrote in reflecting on the art of living, "depends the failure or fruitfulness of it. " Indeed, this act of orienting ourselves – to the moment, to the world, to our own selves – is perhaps the most elusive art of all, and our attempts to master it often leave us fumbling, frustrated, discombobulated.

And yet therein lies our greatest capacity for growth and self-transcendence. Solnit writes in the opening essay: Leave the door open for the unknown, the door into the dark. How to Find Your Life Purpose: An Unconventional Approach. By Leo Babauta Let’s say you’re feeling unmotivated, unsure of yourself, aimless, can’t find your passion, directionless, not clear on what your purpose in life is. You’re in good company — most people are in the same boat. Now, there about a million things online telling you how to find your passion in life, and that’s a good thing. It’s a search worth undergoing. I’m not going to give you a fool-proof method, or a 5-step method, nor share my passion manifesto with you today. I’m going to give you a one-step method. However, that one step is a doozy.

The One Step to Finding Your Purpose It’s simply this: learn to get outside your personal bubble. Your personal bubble is the small world you live in (we all have one), where you are the center of the universe. This is the bubble we all live in most of the time, and people who say they don’t are trying to prove something. When someone tells you you look fat, this only hurts because you’re in your personal bubble. How to Get Out of the Bubble. The psychology and practicalities of becoming a successful artist, David Foster Wallace on writing and how we become who we are, and more.

Hey kara! If you missed last week's edition – Rebecca Solnit on how getting lost helps us find ourselves, a guide for the perplexed, the quest to integrate wonder and wisdom, and more – you can catch up right here. And if you're enjoying this, please consider supporting with a modest donation – every little bit helps, and comes enormously appreciated. Bukowski's Letter of Gratitude to the Man Who Helped Him Quit His Soul-Sucking Job and Become a Full-Time Writer "Unless it comes unasked out of your heart and your mind and your mouth and your gut," Charles Bukowski wrote in his famous poem about what it takes to be a writer, "don’t do it.

" But Bukowski himself was a late bloomer in the journey of finding one's purpose, as his own "it" – that irrepressible impulse to create – took decades to coalesce into a career. But our appreciation for those early champions often comes to light with a slow burn. August 12, 1986 Hello John: Thanks for the good letter.

C.S. Lewis on what free will really means, a children's book that helps kids deal with losing a loved one, Jeanette Winterson on writing, and more. Hey kara! If you missed last week's edition – how to find yourself, Leonard Cohen on creativity and hard work, the art of self-renewal, and more – you can catch up right here. And if you're enjoying this, please consider supporting with a modest donation – every little bit helps, and comes enormously appreciated. New Yorker Cartoonist Roz Chast's Remarkable Illustrated Meditation on Aging, Illness, and Death "Each day, we wake slightly altered, and the person we were yesterday is dead," John Updike wrote in his magnificent memoir.

Count on another beloved New Yorker contributor, cartoonist Roz Chast, to address this delicate and doleful subject with equal parts wit and wisdom in Can't We Talk about Something More Pleasant? The humor and humility with which Chast tackles the enormously difficult subject of aging, illness and death is nothing short of a work of genius. The point here, of course, isn't to dance to the drum of solipsism. Can't We Talk about Something More Pleasant? Werner Herzog on creativity and making a living of doing what you love, Tolstoy's letters to Gandhi on why we hurt each other, and more. Hey kara! If you missed last week's edition – the psychology and practicalities of becoming a successful artist, David Foster Wallace on writing and how we become who we are, Bukowski's letter of gratitude to the man who helped him quit his soul-sucking day job to become a writer, and more – you can catch up right here.

And if you're enjoying this, please consider supporting with a modest donation – every little bit helps, and comes enormously appreciated. Werner Herzog on Creativity, Self-Reliance, Making a Living of What You Love, and How to Turn Your Ideas Into Reality Werner Herzog is celebrated as one of the most influential and innovative filmmakers of our time, but his ascent to acclaim was far from a straight trajectory from privilege to power.

Abandoned by his father at an early age, Herzog survived a WWII bombing that demolished the house next door to his childhood home and was raised by a single mother in near-poverty. Illustration by Tove Jansson from Alice in Wonderland.

Professional Self-awareness & Discovery

Post thesis defense gift-giving « 27 and a PhD. So, yesterday night hon and I talking as we usually do at the end of the day, when he mentions that before he goes to the airport for his defense (this week!!! THIS WEEK PEOPLE!!!) He’s going to pick up some gifts for his examination committee. We’re in different disciplines and the make up of his examination committee is totally different from mine. In grad school, my committee was comprised of local members only. I had to have a certain amount of PIs from within the department and I could have however many from departments other than mine. I gave a 1hr lecture, and immediately after that, I had a 1.5hr-long examination. Hon’s thesis committee is almost completely different from that of his qualifying exam, and the one he’s had for the last couple of years in preparation for his defense.

The whole conversation got me thinking about gift-giving after the defense. So, I have a little poll. <a href=" Our Poll</a> Like this: Like Loading...

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