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Self-Study English Grammar Quizzes. HTML-Only Quizzes Grammar | Places | Vocabulary | Idioms | Homonyms | Scrambled Words | Misc.

Self-Study English Grammar Quizzes

Activities for ESL Students has over 1,000 activities to help you study English as a Second Language. This project of The Internet TESL Journal has contributions by many teachers. Page Contents Articles | Cloze | Conjunctions | Dialogs | Plurals | Prepositions | Pronouns | Sentence Structure | Tag Questions | Verbs | What's the Correct Sequence | Word Choice | Other Quizzes. Grammar. English grammar: A complete guide. Do you have a question about the correct usage of the semi-colon or how to place relative adverbs in a sentence?

English grammar: A complete guide

If so, you've come to the right place! The English grammar guide is a complete reference on the rules of English usage. Every grammatical rule is explained in clear, simple language with several examples and, when necessary, counter-examples. The grammatical rules covered by this guide are categorized by part of speech. You will find the categories listed below. Comparisons Conditional Future. Online exercises for English for Business Barcelona students. The Internet Grammar of English.

Welcome to the Internet Grammar of English!

The Internet Grammar of English

The Internet Grammar of English is an online course in English grammar written primarily for university undergraduates. However, we hope that it will be useful to everyone who is interested in the English language. IGE does not assume any prior knowledge of grammar. The Internet Grammar of English is accessible free of charge. Please note that the Internet Grammar of English has been thoroughly revised and updated, and is now available as an App for Android and Apple mobile devices. Alternatively, to avoid potentially long download times, why not buy The Internet Grammar of English on CD-ROM? To use the site for reference purposes, use the navigation tools on the left. The Parts of Speech. Traditional grammar classifies words based on eight : the verb , the noun , the pronoun , the adjective , the adverb , the preposition , the conjunction , and the interjection .

Each explains not what the word , but how the word . In fact, the same word can be a noun in one sentence and a verb or adjective in the next. The next few examples show how a word's part of speech can change from one sentence to the next, and following them is a series of sections on the individual parts of speech, followed by an exercise. are made of ink, paper, and glue.

In this sentence, "books" is a noun, the subject of the sentence. Deborah waits patiently while Bridget the tickets. Here "books" is a verb, and its subject is "Bridget. " We down the street. In this sentence, "walk" is a verb, and its subject is the pronoun "we. " The mail carrier stood on the . In this example, "walk" is a noun, which is part of a prepositional phrase describing where the mail carrier stood. The town decided to build a new . University of Washington Online English Language Self-Placement Test.