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Growth Mindset

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Recognizing and Overcoming False Growth Mindset. All educators care deeply about their students' motivation.

Recognizing and Overcoming False Growth Mindset

They want them to love learning, and to be resourceful and persistent in the face of learning challenges. They don't want their students to lose heart when they get stuck, make mistakes, or receive disappointing grades. In this context, the growth mindset entered the scene. A growth mindset is the belief that you can develop your talents and abilities through hard work, good strategies, and help from others. It stands in opposition to a fixed mindset, which is the belief that talents and abilities are unalterable traits, ones that can never be improved. We typically teach students a growth mindset through online programs that demonstrate how the brain changes with learning (how the neurons grow stronger connections when students work on hard things and stick with them) and how to apply this to their schoolwork. What ClassDojo Monsters Can Teach Kids About Growth Mindset. Many teachers are excited about the compelling research on the power of a growth mindset to change student perceptions of themselves as learners.

What ClassDojo Monsters Can Teach Kids About Growth Mindset

Stanford psychology professor Carol Dweck discovered that when kids receive a message that their brains are malleable and their abilities can be developed, they approach learning as a challenge that they are ready to embrace. That message resonates with many teachers who have long wanted that type of classroom environment. But while the research is compelling, many teachers still struggle to weave growth mindset into their daily teaching practice. To help provide resources for teaching growth mindset the ed-tech company ClassDojo is teaming up with Stanford’s Project for Education Research That Scales (PERTS) center to produce a series of five animated videos on growth mindset featuring the ClassDojo characters many students already know. “The scope of this study goes beyond just these videos. Katrina Schwartz. Growth Mindset vs. Fixed Mindset. The Educator with a Growth Mindset. Beyond Working Hard: What Growth Mindset Teaches Us About Our Brains.

Growth mindset has become a pervasive theme in education discussions in part because of convincing research by Stanford professor Carol Dweck and others that relatively low-impact interventions on how a student thinks about himself as a learner can have big impacts on learning.

Beyond Working Hard: What Growth Mindset Teaches Us About Our Brains

How Games Naturally Promote A Growth Mindset. How Games Naturally Promote A Growth Mindset by Mary Wissinger Let’s face it: our students are playing games.

How Games Naturally Promote A Growth Mindset

Lots of them. It’s easy to vilify games and say they are the cause of shorter attention spans and behavior issues, but for better or worse, games are not going anywhere. As educators, we have the chance to tap into a movement that has captivated our students’ attention. Why a Growth Mindset is Crucial to Learning. Are you bad at math?

Why a Growth Mindset is Crucial to Learning

And if so, why? A lot of people say that they are bad at math and blame a lack of talent. This belief that we are born being good at certain things and bad at other things is called a fixed mindset. If you ascribe to this idea, then you see intelligence and ability as static. What is Mindset. Every so often a truly groundbreaking idea comes along.

What is Mindset

This is one. Mindset explains: Why brains and talent don’t bring success How they can stand in the way of it Why praising brains and talent doesn’t foster self-esteem and accomplishment, but jeopardizes them How teaching a simple idea about the brain raises grades and productivity What all great CEOs, parents, teachers, athletes know Mindset is a simple idea discovered by world-renowned Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck in decades of research on achievement and success—a simple idea that makes all the difference. In a fixed mindset, people believe their basic qualities, like their intelligence or talent, are simply fixed traits. Growth Mindset: Clearing up Some Common Confusions. By Eduardo Briceño A growth mindset is the understanding that personal qualities and abilities can change.

Growth Mindset: Clearing up Some Common Confusions

It leads people to take on challenges, persevere in the face of setbacks, and become more effective learners. As more and more people learn about the growth mindset, which was first discovered by Stanford Professor Carol Dweck, we sometimes observe some confusions about it. Recently some critiques have emerged. Of course we invite critical analysis and feedback, as it helps all of us learn and improve, but some of the recent commentary seems to point to misunderstandings of growth mindset research and practice. Confusion #1: What a growth mindset is When we ask people to tell us what the growth mindset is, we often get lots of different answers, such as working hard, having high expectations, being resilient, or more general ideas like being open or flexible. The Science: The Growth Mindset - Mindset Works®: Student Motivation through a Growth Mindset, by Carol Dweck, Ph.D. Why the Growth Mindset?

The Science: The Growth Mindset - Mindset Works®: Student Motivation through a Growth Mindset, by Carol Dweck, Ph.D.

When students and educators have a growth mindset, they understand that intelligence can be developed. Students focus on improvement instead of worrying about how smart they are. They work hard to learn more and get smarter. Based on years of research by Stanford University’s Dr. Dweck, Lisa Blackwell Ph.D., and their colleagues, we know that students who learn this mindset show greater motivation in school, better grades, and higher test scores.

What does a Growth Mindset School look like? Administrators support teachers’ learning. Teachers collaborate with their colleagues and instructional leaders, rather than shut their classroom doors and fly solo. Parents support their children’s learning both inside and outside the classroom. Students are enthusiastic, hard-working, persistent learners.