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Riel Resistance and Gabriel Dumont

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Manitoba History: Red River Resistance. Number 29, Spring 1995 The following text is taken from a brochure recently published by the Historic Resources Branch of Manitoba Culture, Heritage and Citizenship.

Manitoba History: Red River Resistance

Gabriel Dumont. The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. Gabriel Dumont.

The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan Archives Board R-A6277 Gabriel Dumont—the name conjures up a host of images: the diminutive but courageous chef métis who led his people in armed struggle against the Dominion of Canada; the 19th-century Che Guevara passionately concerned with his people’s self-governance; the quintessential homme de prairie who lived freely as a bison hunter and entrepreneur; and the humanitarian who shared his bounty with the less fortunate. Gabriel Dumont was a man of action, whose many admirable qualities, including his selflessness, courage, sense of duty and love of his people, have inspired generations of Métis. Despite being so lionized, little is known of Gabriel Dumont prior to the 1870s. He was born in December 1837 in St. Dumont’s life as a young adult was typical of other Métis.

Gabriel Dumont. Gabriel Dumont, Métis leader (born December 1837 at Red River Settlement; died 19 May 1906 at Bellevue, SK).

Gabriel Dumont

Dumont rose to political prominence in an age of declining buffalo herds and was concerned about the ongoing economic prosperity and political independence of his people. Gabriel Dumont, Métis leader (born December 1837 at Red River Settlement; died 19 May 1906 at Bellevue, SK). Dumont rose to political prominence in an age of declining buffalo herds and was concerned about the ongoing economic prosperity and political independence of his people.

He was a prominent hunt chief and warrior, but is best known for his role in the 1885 North-West Resistance as a key Métis military commander and ally of Louis Riel. Dumont remains a popular Métis folk hero, remembered for his selflessness and bravery during the conflict of 1885 and for his unrivaled skill as a Métis hunt chief. DUMONT, GABRIEL – Volume XIII (1901-1910) DUMONT, GABRIEL, Métis hunter, merchant, ferryman, and political and military leader; b.

DUMONT, GABRIEL – Volume XIII (1901-1910)

December 1837 in the Red River settlement (Man.), second son of Isidore Dumont, known as Ekapow, and Louise Laframboise; m. 1858 Madeleine Wilkie at St Joseph (Walhalla, N.Dak.); they had no children but adopted a son and daughter; d. 19 May 1906 in Bellevue (St-Isidore-de-Bellevue), Sask. Gabriel Dumont is remembered principally for his role as Louis Riel*’s military commander during the North-West rebellion of 1885. Although some historians have endeavoured to portray him as a leader of broader scope, there is not much evidence to support such a view. Gabriel Dumont. Gabriel Dumont is best known as the man who led the small Métis military forces during the Northwest Resistance of 1885.

Gabriel Dumont

He was born in the Red River area in 1837, the son of Isidore Dumont, a Métis hunter, and Louise Laframboise. Although unable to read or write, Dumont could speak six languages and was highly adept at the essential skills of the plains: horseback riding and marksmanship. These abilities made Dumont a natural leader in the large annual Buffalo hunts that were an important part of Métis culture. Canada in the Making - Specific Events & Topics. PDF Version | Word Version | Rich Text Format | Text Format The period immediately following Confederation was a particularly volatile one on the Canadian Prairies, particularly in the old Red River Settlement region that would soon come to be known as Manitoba.

Canada in the Making - Specific Events & Topics

The leader of two major rebellions in the Canadian West was a Métis named Louis Riel, who encouraged his fellow mixed-bloods to stand up for their rights through armed conflict. His tactics would work during one rebellion, but fail miserably in another - leading to both his downfall and, indirectly, the downfall of Aboriginal leaders who sided with him. Red River Rebellion, 1869 - 1870 North-West Rebellion, 1885 Red River Rebellion, 1869 - 1870 Many Ontarians wanted to push settlement west after Confederation and began to pressure the federal government to take the steps to make that possible.

The distances to be covered by any military force were enormous, and there was as yet no rail service west. Copyright/Source. Birth of Manitoba : Digital Resources on Manitoba History. Birth of Manitoba Page 4 of 7 The resistance at Red River The Red River Resistance lasted from November 1869, when the Métis blocked William McDougall's entrance, to August 1870 when the British military expedition arrived at Red River.

Birth of Manitoba : Digital Resources on Manitoba History

During that period Louis Riel tried with varying levels of success to bring the English and French speaking portions of the community together in a single government that would negotiate terms of entry with the Canadian government. While the Métis had originally formed a National Committee of the Métis of Red River to turn back McDougall and seize Upper Fort Garry, one of Riel's first acts was to call on the English-speaking portion of the community to send 12 delegates to meet with 12 French-speaking residents to debate the community's future.

The only people in Red River who were likely to respond to McDougall's call for revolt were the Canadians, many of whom had barricaded themselves in Schultz's home in Winnipeg. Red River Rebellion.