background preloader

Twentieth Century History

Facebook Twitter

Activism in the US · DPLA Omeka. Digital Public Library of America. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Cold War Museum. Additional Links.

Cold War Museum

Civil Rights Movement - Black History. Severe government repression, the assassinations of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, and the intense infighting within the black militant community caused a decline in protest activity after the 1960s.

Civil Rights Movement - Black History

The African-American freedom struggle nevertheless left a permanent mark on American society. Overt forms of racial discrimination and government-supported segregation of public facilities came to an end, although de facto, as opposed to de jure, segregation persisted in northern as well as southern public school systems and in other areas of American society. In the South, antiblack violence declined. Black candidates were elected to political offices in communities where blacks had once been barred from voting, and many of the leaders or organizations that came into existence during the 1950s and 1960s remained active in southern politics. Southern colleges and universities that once excluded blacks began to recruit them. Apartheid and reactions to it. The architects of Apartheid. © Apartheid Museum Archive.

Apartheid and reactions to it

In 1948, the National Party (NP), representing Afrikaners, won the national election on a platform of racism and segregation under the slogan of 'apartheid’. Apartheid built upon earlier laws, but made segregation more rigid and enforced it more aggressively. All Government action and response was decided according to the policy of apartheid. In turn, apartheid failed to respond effectively and adequately to concerns that had led to intermittent labour and civic unrest that erupted in the aftermath of World War II. Consequently, throughout the 1950s unrest in African, Coloured and Indian communities escalated, becoming more frequent and determined.

After the 1948 elections, as the liberation movements intensified their efforts, the Government came down heavily on them. History of Fashion 1920's - 1930's. History of Fashion 1920’s – 1930’s ‘Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only.

History of Fashion 1920's - 1930's

Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening’ Coco Chanel Copyright © AFP/Collection Roger-Viollet – Concours d’élégance en 1925. World War Two - Causes. World War Two began in September 1939 when Britain and France declared war on Germany following Germany's invasion of Poland.

World War Two - Causes

Although the outbreak of war was triggered by Germany's invasion of Poland, the causes of the war are more complex. Treaty of Versailles In 1919, Lloyd George of England, Orlando of Italy, Clemenceau of France and Woodrow Wilson from the US met to discuss how Germany was to be made to pay for the damage world war one had caused. Woodrow Wilson wanted a treaty based on his 14-point plan which he believed would bring peace to Europe. Georges Clemenceau wanted revenge. Lloyd George personally agreed with Wilson but knew that the British public agreed with Clemenceau. The Great Depression - Facts & Summary. Among the programs and institutions of the New Deal that aided in recovery from the Great Depression were the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), which built dams and hydroelectric projects to control flooding and provide electric power to the impoverished Tennessee Valley region of the South, and the Works Project Administration (WPA), a permanent jobs program that employed 8.5 million people from 1935 to 1943.

The Great Depression - Facts & Summary

After showing early signs of recovery beginning in the spring of 1933, the economy continued to improve throughout the next three years, during which real GDP (adjusted for inflation) grew at an average rate of 9 percent per year. A sharp recession hit in 1937, caused in part by the Federal Reserve’s decision to increase its requirements for money in reserve.

The Treaty of Versailles. The World Factbook. The Office of Public Affairs (OPA) is the single point of contact for all inquiries about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).

The World Factbook

We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate. However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Contact Information Submit questions or comments online By postal mail: Central Intelligence Agency Office of Public Affairs Washington, D.C. 20505 By phone:(703) 482-0623Open during normal business hours. By fax:(571) 204-3800(please include a phone number where we may call you) Contact the Office of Inspector General Contact the Employment Verification Office Before contacting us: Please check our site map, search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) International (Doctors Without Borders) Amnesty International. World History Archives: History of world society.

World History Archives is a thorough source for documents on twentieth century history. – karenmalbon