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Cables. Knitty.com. If you've stuck to knitting in single colors, or maybe just ventured into stripes, here's some good news: You can achieve what appear to be complicated color patterns while using only one yarn at a time!

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Many knitters suffer from fear of Fair Isle because they are loathe to carry two colors at once. It seems complicated and unwieldy. If you're ready for a little more adventurous use of color and pattern, why not try mosaic knitting? Using a simple slip-stitch technique, you can create bands and borders in pattern, or even a whole sweater, and you won't ever have to carry a second yarn along!

Color slip-stitch knitting has been around for a long time, but it was brought into the spotlight for a time by Barbara Walker who dubbed the style "mosaic knitting" in the late '60s. The technique of two-color slip-stitch knitting is really quite simple: If you can knit simple stripes and slip a stitch, you have all the skills you need.

How to Knit the Oblique Rib Stitch. Music in video is from demo 2008 by (Latchxe9 Swing) / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 This video knitting tutorial will help you learn how to knit the oblique rib stitch.

How to Knit the Oblique Rib Stitch

This simple rib pattern creates a diagonal broken rib and is great for large pieces of fabric like afghans and pillows, or scarves. Skill: Easy Cast On: Multiples of 4 For this pattern you will need to know the following techniques: Knit – k Purl – p Pattern: Row 1 (RS): *K2, p2; rep from * to end Row 2: K1, *p2, k2; rep from * to last st, k1 Row 3: *P2, k2; rep from * to end Row 4: P1, *k2, p2; rep from * to last st, p1 Repeat rows 1 – 4 until you have reached your desired length. After a few repeats your pattern should look like this: Example of the Oblique Rib Stitch Join over 24,000 New Stitch VIPs and Receive: Daily or Weekly email updates of all our FREE tutorialsGiveaways and contests just for members Free LIVE online workshopsSpecial discounts on classes, ebooks, and patterns. How to Knit the Woven Cable Stitch. Music in video is from demo 2008 by (Latchxe9 Swing) / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 This video knitting tutorial will help you learn how to knit the woven cable stitch.

How to Knit the Woven Cable Stitch

This cable pattern creates a tight, dense fabric with a woven look. It does not drape very well, but may be good for pillows and afghans. Skill: Intermediate Cast On: Multiples of 4 For this pattern you will need to know the following techniques: Knit – k Purl – p Cable Four Front – C4F Cable Four Back – C4B. Know this Pattern???? Technickety: How to unvent a simple cable.

I had a heap of messages asking where the cable for Jeff's glove came from.

Technickety: How to unvent a simple cable

It's a fairly generic multi-strand cable; called a "Saxon Braid" (thanks, Purly White!). I see Wendy at wendyknits has used it for a sweater, and I'm sure it's to be found in stitch dictionaries. That said, being able to read an existing cable and knowing how to reconstruct it is a very useful skill. I'm not suggesting, of course, that the following be used in any way that takes credit away from a designer of a garment - rather, this is a reference for understanding how a simple cable works and how to write a chart. The actual process is far more intuitive than what follows, but I've written each step out, just for documentation's sake. ***I should say my intention here isn't to be patronizing at all; I'm sure most of you have been doing this for a long time without this kind of manic detail.

According to my definition, a "simple cable": Step by step 9) Add your WS row with strands as established. See? How to Knit a Reversible Tweed Stitch. Dewdrop Cloth. Latest Post It must be Thursday… I never could get the hang of Thursdays.

Dewdrop Cloth

-Arthur Dent in Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy I watched Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy again. Although I’m sure there are Douglas Adams purists out there who object to the 2005 movie interpretation of the book, this is a favourite movie of ... Read More Our Story Tricksy Knitter is the brainchild of Megan Goodacre and Charles Jaimet. As a programmer (Charles) and designer (Megan), they had made a lot of websites, but one day thought it was about time they work on a personal project, just for fun. One rollercoaster ride and several thousand yards of yarn later, here we are, in Ottawa, with a growing library of knitting patterns, a huge how-to-knit section, a couple of books, an exclusive line of knitting accessories, and an online chartmaker.

Roman Stitch - How to Knit Roman Stitch.