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People Who Achieve Their Goals Do These 5 Things. When Angela Duckworth was 27, she left her high-pressure management-consulting job for an even tougher gig: teaching seventh-grade math at a New York City public school. Duckworth quickly learned it wasn’t smarts that determined whether her students accomplished their goals and got good grades—not by a long shot. “I was convinced every one of my students could learn the material if they worked long and hard enough,” she says in her popular TED talk. After a few years of teaching, Duckworth found herself asking the question, “What if doing well in school and in life depends on much more than your ability to learn quickly and easily?”

She’s made a career of that question, becoming a psychologist who has studied how and why people set and—most importantly—achieve their goals. A key quality she’s found that separates the winners from the losers? Grit. “Grit is stamina. Have a Growth Mindset “They challenge themselves and grow.” Set Meaningful Goals Build Accountability into Your Life. How To Be Efficient: Dan Ariely's 6 New Secrets To Managing Your Time. It’s hard to be efficient. Sometimes it feels like the world doesn’t make any sense. Sometimes you don’t make any sense.

And sometimes it feels like it’s all a conspiracy. As we’ll see shortly, these are all, in a way, true. Dan Ariely is the king of irrational behavior. Dan is a behavioral economist at Duke University and the New York Times bestselling author of three wonderful books: Most recently he’s turned his attention to the irrationality of how we use our time and has helped create a new smart-calendar app, Timeful. What’s great is the data from Timeful is helping us learn things about what works and what doesn’t as it relates to productivity. I gave Dan a call to hear what he had to say about how we can improve time management, how to be efficient and how to get more done. 1) The World Is Working Against You This isn’t a conspiracy theory and a tinfoil hat isn’t required, but we are spending more of our time in environments that have their own agendas. Here’s Dan: (Short on time? Sum Up. Productivity Strategies. Screw motivation, what you need is discipline. | WISDOMINATION.

If you want to get anything done, there are two basic ways to get yourself to do it. The first, more popular and devastatingly wrong option is to try to motivate yourself. The second, somewhat unpopular and entirely correct choice is to cultivate discipline. This is one of these situations where adopting a different perspective immediately results in superior outcomes. Few uses of the term “paradigm shift” are actually legitimate, but this one is. It’s a lightbulb moment. What’s the difference? Motivation, broadly speaking, operates on the erroneous assumption that a particular mental or emotional state is necessary to complete a task. That’s completely the wrong way around. Discipline, by contrast, separates outwards functioning from moods and feelings and thereby ironically circumvents the problem by consistently improving them. The implications are huge. Put in simpler form, you don’t wait until you’re in olympic form to start training.

Source of picture You get to feel good afterwards. 50 Ways to Get Your Life in Order. This is an article by guest writer Mark Foo, author of The 77 Traits of Highly Successful People. There’s nothing wrong with a little bit of chaos in your life. As Albert Einstein once stated, “Three rules of work: out of clutter find simplicity, from discord find harmony, in the middle of difficulty lies opportunity.” Unexpected challenges are what make us stronger, so don’t avoid them. Keep in mind the following 50 tips and you’ll be able to streamline your life and get back on track in the New Year.

Recycle old papers that are filling drawers in your house. If you’re anything like me, you have drawers overflowing with old receipts, junk mail, records, and notes to myself. Do you have a tip to help us get our lives in order? The Morning Routine Experts Recommend for Peak Productivity. What’s the best way to start your day so that you really get things done?

Laura Vanderkam studied the schedules of high-achievers. What did she find? Almost all have a morning routine. I’ve interviewed a ton of top experts about their productivity secrets: Tim Ferriss, Cal Newport, Dan Ariely, Charles Duhigg, and others. But you’re busy. So many readers have written to me saying what my friend Jason always does: “I don’t have time. Okay, time to round up what the experts have said and build a roadmap. 1) Stop Reacting Get up before the insanity starts. When I spoke to productivity guru Tim Ferriss, bestselling author of The 4-Hour Workweek, what did he say?

Here’s Tim: I try to have the first 80 to 90 minutes of my day vary as little as possible. Most of us get up and it seems like things are already in motion. So of course you aren’t achieving your goals. You need to wake up before the insanity starts. (For more from Tim Ferriss on what the most productive people do every day, click here.) Fixed vs. Growth: The Two Basic Mindsets That Shape Our Lives. “If you imagine less, less will be what you undoubtedly deserve,” Debbie Millman counseled in one of the best commencement speeches ever given, urging: “Do what you love, and don’t stop until you get what you love.

Work as hard as you can, imagine immensities…” Far from Pollyanna platitude, this advice actually reflects what modern psychology knows about how belief systems about our own abilities and potential fuel our behavior and predict our success. Much of that understanding stems from the work of Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck, synthesized in her remarkably insightful Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (public library) — an inquiry into the power of our beliefs, both conscious and unconscious, and how changing even the simplest of them can have profound impact on nearly every aspect of our lives.

One of the most basic beliefs we carry about ourselves, Dweck found in her research, has to do with how we view and inhabit what we consider to be our personality. 27 Hard Questions Awesome People Ask Themselves Right Now. | Dan Waldschmidt: Author of EDGY Conversations. Do you dare to dream? 5 Routines To Clear Mental Clutter. That smartphone in your pocket? It’s nearly doubling the amount of time you spend working. A 2013 survey by the Center for Creative Leadership found that the typical smartphone-carrying professional interacts with work an average of 72 hours a week.

No wonder we’re all so stressed out. "Year after year, people complain of being more overwhelmed than they were the year before," says Scott Eblin, author of Overworked and Overwhelmed: The Mindfulness Alternative "It’s an epidemic that needs to be addressed. " It started during the financial crisis of 2008, says Eblin. "Organizations had to downsize to survive, and the employees who were left had to do more," he says. The popularity of the smartphone only worsened the issue. For Eblin, an executive coach and president of the Eblin Group, the impact of stress hit home in 2009 when he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. "Managing MS is about managing stress," he says. The opposite of fight or flight is "rest and digest. " 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Productivity

Don't Break the Chain. Developing self discipline. Time management series Self-discipline Self-discipline can be considered a type of selective training, creating new habits ofthought, action, and speech toward improving yourself and reaching goals. Self-discipline can also be task oriented and selective.View self-discipline as positive effort, rather than one of denial. Schedule a small task for a given time of the day; Practice deliberate delaying.

Schedule a particular task in the morning and once in the evening. The task should not take more than 15 minutes. Wait for the exact scheduled time.When the schedule time is due, start the task. Harness the power of routine. Instead of devoting a lot of hours one day, and none the other and then a few on an another day and so on, allocate a specific time period each day of the week for that task. Use self discipline to explore time management Time management can become an overwhelming task.When you do not have control over your own self, how can you control time? Discouragement: Tricks: Start Every Day as a Producer, Not a Consumer.

I have to agree that my most productive days are those where I don't allow myself to read the news, check e-mail, facebook, etc., right after I get up. However, that happens because I've got a ton of stuff to get done, and the outside world takes a back seat until my workload is under control. However, there are certain biological necessities that have to happen before I can be productive. The dog gets let out, I go to the bathroom, I eat/drink something, and *then* I sit down to be productive. I also *have* to check my e-mail, because if something blew up overnight or there's something that needs to be dealt with ASAP, I need to know as early as possible. Flagged. Stop Procrastinating by "Clearing to Neutral" By Thanh Pham We often procrastinate because there is this one hidden thing holding us back. It is this one thing that makes you procrastinate and most people are not even aware what this is, but if you eliminate it you can say goodbye to procrastination forever.

Friction A lot of times we procrastinate because we have to jump through a lot of hurdles before we can do the thing we actually want to do. For example, let’s say you need to prepare dinner. So you need your dishes, cutlery, pots and pans. But what if they are still in the sink from the time you used them for lunch? To put it in other words, before you can do your main activity (cooking), you have to all these others things (cleaning) before you can get to your main activity.

If you make it hard for yourself to get started, that’s when you will most likely procrastinate. Now imagine you actually cleaned your desk and now you need to do some work on your computer. Our friend Eben Pagan uses the analogy of cleaning a grill. Traits of the disciplined mind. The 18 Minute Ritual That Will Make Your Day Dramatically More Productive.

10 Lifestyle Changes You Should Make In Your 30s. Your 30s are an exciting time! You may feel like you’re in the prime of your life—or you could feel like you’re slowing down a bit. Either way, you are wiser and have experienced a little more of life. You’ve, hopefully, gotten some unhealthy behaviors out of your system like clubbing all weekend and spending all your disposable cash on new kicks or handbags. You are now easing into the motions of adult life. To give you a heads-up on this new, exciting phase of your life, here are 10 lifestyle changes you should make in your 30s to enjoy wellness of body and mind, and lay the foundation for lifelong success. 1. Loving yourself and becoming comfort in your own skin is particularly important in your 30s as you settle into adulthood and all it entails, including bills, career, taxes, a spouse and maybe even kids.

Start each day by appreciating and applauding yourself for you are beautiful, smart and capable, and you are doing the best you can. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Daily Rituals: A Guided Tour of Writers’ and Artists’ Creative Habits. By Maria Popova Hemingway wrote standing, Nabokov on index cards, Twain while puffing cigars, and Sitwell in an open coffin. “We are spinning our own fates, good or evil, and never to be undone,” the William James’s famous words on habit echo. “Every smallest stroke of virtue or of vice leaves its never so little scar.” Given this omnibus of the daily routines of famous writers was not only one of my favorite articles to research but also the most-read and -shared one in the entire history of Brain Pickings, imagine my delight at the release of Daily Rituals: How Artists Work (public library) by Mason Currey, based on his blog of the same title.

The notion that if only we could replicate the routines of great minds, we’d be able to reverse-engineer their genius is, of course, an absurd one — yet an alluring one nonetheless. Mark Twain — master of epistolary snark, unsuspected poet, cheeky adviser of little girls — followed a simple but rigorous routine: Photograph courtesy BBC. James Clear: How to Stop Procrastinating by Using the 'Two-Minute Rule' Recently, I've been following a simple rule that is helping me crush procrastination and making it easier for me to stick to good habits at the same time. I want to share it with you today so that you can try it out and see how it works in your life. The best part? It's a simple strategy that couldn't be easier to use.

Here's what you need to know. How to Stop Procrastinating With the "Two-Minute Rule" I call this little strategy the "Two-Minute Rule," and the goal is to make it easier for you to get started on the things you should be doing. Here's the deal: Most of the tasks that you procrastinate on aren't actually difficult to do -- you have the talent and skills to accomplish them -- you just avoid starting them for one reason or another.

The two-minute rule overcomes procrastination and laziness by making it so easy to start taking action that you can't say no. There are two parts to the two-minute rule... Part One: If it takes less than two minutes, then do it now. Try It Now. Top 10 Qualities of Extremely Successful People. 5 Unusual Ways to Start Working Smarter, Not Harder, Backed by Science. One of the things I love about the culture at Buffer is the emphasis on working smarter, not harder. Our team is all about getting plenty of sleep, exercise and recreation time so that our time spent working is as productive as it can be. Working harder can be an easy habit to slip into, though. Sometimes it’s hard to switch off at the end of the day, or to take time out on the weekend and stop thinking about work. With a startup of my own to run, I find this even harder to manage lately. Whenever I’m not working on Buffer, I’m working on Exist, and it’s easy to fall into a pattern of “always working,” rather than working smart and fitting in time to look after myself as well.

If this happens to you, too, here are five methods to try that’ll help get you working smarter, not harder. 1. In one of my favorite books, Stephen Covey tells a story about a woodcutter whose saw gets more blunt as time passes and he continues cutting down trees. 2. So when should you be taking a nap? 3. 4. 5. This-7-minute-morning-routine-will-change-your-work-life. 17 Small Productivity Habits. The Mini-Habit The idea behind mini habits is that you can get to a larger habit if you start small, create simple goals, and aim for consistency. In his book Mini Habits: Small Habits, Bigger Results, Stephen Guise gives the example of “The One Pushup Challenge.” He was doing what a lot of us do.

Feeling guilty about not working out, he tried to fit years worth of exercise into the first workout which created an all or nothing attitude (not to mention a focus on goals and not process.) Well, one day he decided to do the opposite. He did only one pushup. In Habit Stacking: 97 Small Life Changes That Take Five Minutes or Less, author S. The core idea behind the mini-habits concept is that you can build a major habit by thinking small enough to get started. Habit-Stacking The purpose of habit-stacking is to create simple and repeatable routines (managed by a checklist). According to Scott there are 8 Elements of a habit-stacking routine. 17 Small Productivity Habits #2. . #3. . #4. . #5. . #6. . #7. Taking Journaling to Another Level.