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How did this page of quality lessons come about? In 2005, WritingFix and the Northern Nevada Writing Project received a generous grant that helped begin the very popular lesson collection you will find on this page. The generous $25,000 AT&T Grant, acquired with the help of the Washoe Education Foundation, allowed us to design and host a very different kind of inservice class for 100 Northern Nevada teachers, and that inservice made possible this page. Members of the Northern Nevada Writing Project's Technology Team created and demonstrated eight brand new picture book lessons to the first 100 teachers who signed up; they then gave away 100 copies of each of the picture books so that class participants could teach any of the lessons back in their classrooms. Our Picture Book Inservice continues in Northern Nevada. "Your [Picture Books] inservice is--by far--the most valuable class I have ever taken as a teacher. Mentor Text Lessons...inspired by Picture Books Mentor Text Lessons...inspired by Picture Books
Questionnaires for Writing Character Profiles - Creative Writing Help Enter your e-mail to get the e-book for FREE. We'll also keep you informed about interesting website news. "I have searched the web and used different worksheets, but none have come close to your worksheets and descriptions of (what to do and what not to do). Both courses I have taken have with Creative Writing Now have been amazing. Each time I have learned something new. The one thing I love, you take everything apart and give examples." - Katlen Skye "As usual - I already love the course on Irresistible Fiction, rewriting a lot and improving greatly even after the first lesson. “Essentials of Fiction proved that I could indeed write and I wrote every day, much to my boyfriend's dismay (waa sniff).” - Jill Gardner "I am loving the course and the peer interaction on the blog is fantastic!!!" "I'm enjoying the weekly email course, Essentials of Poetry Writing. "Thank you for all the material in this course. "Thanks very much for this course. "I'm learning so much. "Thank you so much!! Questionnaires for Writing Character Profiles - Creative Writing Help
Writing Writing www.eslfast.com/robot/ What does "Tutor Mike" know? "Tutor Mike" won the second place in International Loebner Prize 2016 Contest in AI "Tutor Mike" won the semifinal in 2015 Chatterbox Challenge and is recognized as one of the top four chatbots on the net "Tutor Mike" won the fifth place in International Loebner Prize 2014 Contest in AI "Tutor Mike" won one first place and one second place in International Loebner Prize 2013 Contest in AI "Tutor Mike" won one first place and one fourth place in International Loebner Prize 2011 Contest in AI ESL: English as a Second LanguageESL Fast Copyright © 2017. All rights reserved. rong-chang ESL, Inc.tesl eslfast.com
Writing: Similes and Metaphors Global rating average: 0.0 out of 50.00.00.00.00.0 These sites explain how to use similes and metaphors to improve your writing. There are many examples plus interactive quizzes and classroom activity ideas. Includes links to eThemes Resources on personification and other forms of figurative language. Grades Links ReadWriteThink Activities on Similes, Metaphors, Poetry This site provides a variety of activities using language and poetry. Education Standards Request State Standards Writing: Similes and Metaphors
WritingFix: prompts, lessons, and resources for writing classrooms
Submitted by NWREL Staff Name: Bad Analogies Traits: Ideas, Sentence Fluency Grade Level: Middle School (6-8), High School (9-12) Time: Two or more class periods Supplies:Examples (in pdf file) of bad and good analogies, writing materialsLesson Description: 1) This lesson should follow discussion and activities relating to literary terms. 2) Students are bound to write some bad analogies on their own, so this lesson brings them out into the open where everyone can have some fun with them. 3) Share some example of both good and bad analogies--what makes the good ones good, what makes the bad ones bad. 4) Students should then write two bad analogies, one good one, and borrow a professional example from literature, formatted in this order for display. Note: If a lesson plan has an associated worksheet, it is available for download in PDF format, which requires the free Acrobat Reader plug-in. 6+1 Trait® Writing Assessment Lesson Plans | Education Northwest 6+1 Trait® Writing Assessment Lesson Plans | Education Northwest
writing project This piece is about collecting stories and ideas from life and from the internet. Writer Jonathan Harris, in this TED Talk explains his unique vision of how stories can be found in the artifacts left on a street corner, harvested from blogs with with bots, or captured by camera while exploring Inuit whaling camps in Barrow Alaska. The talk ends with a photo essay themed on happiness and wishes found in the Kingdom of Bhutan. Harris interviewed over a hundred folks found along the paths of Bhutan. He asked each to write one wish on a balloon. This man creates technology generated mind-maps that go way beyond the solo clustering we sometimes teach as idea generation. Harris is a traveler, thinker, and creator. video: Jonathan's website: writing project
An introduction to intertextuality In traditional literary theory, it is assumed that when we read a work of literature we are trying to find a meaning which lies inside that work. Literary texts possess meaning, and that is why readers extract meaning from them. The process of extracting meaning from texts is called interpretation. However, in contemporary literary and cultural theory such ideas have been radically changed. It is now believed that works of literature are built from systems, codes, and traditions established by previous works of literature. It is claimed that the act of reading, rather than the interpretation of one work, engages the reader in discovering a network of textual relations. The word “intertextuality” derives from the Latin intertexto, meaning to ‘mingle while weaving’ (Keep et al 2000). The origins of intertextuality, like modern literary and cultural theory itself, can be traced back to 20th-century linguistics. “Any text is a new tissue of past citations. Resources: An introduction to intertextuality
The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows
Contraintes 99 notes préparatoires À supposer… Graphe N-ine n X prend Y pour Z Zeugme dessiné
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Mugshots: where you make the character!
"How to Write an Essay -- 10 Easy Steps": A Step-by-Step Guide For Students Writing Essays, or For College Instructors Teaching Essay Writing "How to Write an Essay -- 10 Easy Steps": A Step-by-Step Guide For Students Writing Essays, or For College Instructors Teaching Essay Writing Either write something worth reading, or do something worth writing.-- Benjamin Franklin Brief Overview of the 10 Essay Writing Steps Below are brief summaries of each of the ten steps to writing an essay. Select the links for more info on any particular step, or use the blue navigation bar on the left to proceed through the writing steps. How To Write an Essay can be viewed sequentially, as if going through ten sequential steps in an essay writing process, or can be explored by individual topic. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. (Note: The title and first paragraph are probably the most important elements in your essay. 7. 8. 9. 10. You're done. My Promise: The Rest of This Site Will Really Teach You How To Write an Essay For half a dozen years I've read thousands of college essays and taught students how to write essays, do research, analyze arguments, and so on. Now it's time to really begin.
Creative Writing Journal Prompts 1. Imagine you had a hundred dollars, but you couldn't keep it. You had to give it away to a person or charity. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. See also: Writing Prompts This page has printable writing prompt worksheets. Persuasive Writing Prompts Check out our collection of persuasive writing topics. Writing Story Pictures Write a creative stories to describe what's happening in these pictures. Creative Writing Journal Prompts
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Writing Prompts
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Skillswise - Types of text
Online Writing Lab: General Writing This page is brought to you by the OWL at Purdue University. When printing this page, you must include the entire legal notice. Copyright ©1995-2018 by The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. Important notice regarding MLA 9: Updates published in the most recent version of the MLA Handbook (9th edition) are now available on the OWL. If you are having trouble locating a specific resource, please visit the search page or the Site Map. The Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University houses writing resources and instructional material, and we provide these as a free service of the Writing Lab at Purdue. For more information about services for the Purdue University community, including one-to-one consultations, ESL conversation groups and workshops, please visit the Writing Lab site. Mission A Message From the Assistant Director of Content Development All the best,Garrett Need Help Navigating the New Site? Social Media
These OWL resources will help you understand and complete specific types of writing assignments, such as annotated bibliographies, book reports, and research papers. This section also includes resources on writing academic proposals for conference presentations, journal articles, and books. Understanding Writing Assignments This resource describes some steps you can take to better understand the requirements of your writing assignments. This resource works for either in-class, teacher-led discussion or for personal use. Argument Papers This resource outlines the generally accepted structure for introductions, body paragraphs, and conclusions in an academic argument paper. Research Papers This handout provides detailed information about how to write research papers including discussing research papers as a genre, choosing topics, and finding sources. Exploratory Papers This resource will help you with exploratory/inquiry essay assignments. Annotated Bibliographies Book Report Definitions Online Writing Lab: Common Writing Assignments Online Writing Lab: Common Writing Assignments
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Truths About Fiction The following essay was previewed in the class that Stephen Graham Jones taught for LitReactor, Your Life Story Is Five Pages Long. 1. The reader should never have to work to figure out the basics of your story. Who’s whose wife or husband, what the time period is if that matters, why these people have broken into this house, and on and on, just the basic, ground-level facts about your story. 2. Meaning you don’t have to lay every last detail of every last thing out. The best writers are the ones who can cover the most distance with the fewest words. 3. It can be as simple as if the story opens with what feels like a dramatic frame—two people sitting by a fireplace, talking over brandy—then we already expect the story to circle back to that fireplace. 4. You open with a hook, of course—the title—then you hook with the first line, then, usually at the end of the first paragraph, you set that hook. 5. They’re not reading so you can render for them their already quotidian lives. 6. 7. 8. 9.
So what do you do when you’re pressed for time, swamped under works and you still need to get some stuff written, and written well? Your nerves are tightened up so well that you can’t sleep, but you can’t squeeze even a sentence out of your mind. I know the feeling so well, but what I did then was, just start writing fast without even thinking, then a professional article was born with the time shorter than usual. Heck, it might be even more professional than my previous articles! (Image Source: Fotolia) The phenomena has nothing to do with the God I worship, or any supernatural phenomenon, it’s just how brain works: we write fast and professionally if we can just limit something, abandon certain habits, and put up some beneficial habits. Articles you might be interested as well: 1. To be honest, I hate this method. (Image Source: Fotolia) If you’re pressed for time and really want get some writing done, open up a fresh Microsoft Word document, and start typing. 2. (Image Source: Fotolia) Tips And Tricks For Writing
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150 amazing images to help students write and think more creatively
Creative Writing Journal Prompts
Coming Soon: A new look for our same great content! We're working hard this summer on a redesign of the Purdue OWL. Worry not! Our navigation menu and content will remain largely the same. If you are having trouble locating a specific resource, please visit the search page or the Site Map. The Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University houses writing resources and instructional material, and we provide these as a free service of the Writing Lab at Purdue. For more information about services for the Purdue University community, including one-to-one consultations, ESL conversation groups and workshops, please visit the Writing Lab site. Mission The Purdue University Writing Lab and Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL) assist clients in their development as writers—no matter what their skill level—with on-campus consultations, online participation, and community engagement. OWL
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