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Neuroscience's New Consciousness Theory Is Spiritual | Bobby Azarian Neuroscience's New Consciousness Theory Is Spiritual | Bobby Azarian “Science is not only compatible with spirituality; it is a profound source of spirituality” -Carl Sagan It appears that we are approaching a unique time in the history of man and science where empirical measures and deductive reasoning can actually inform us spiritually. Integrated Information Theory (IIT)—put forth by neuroscientists Giulio Tononi and Christof Koch—is a new framework that describes a way to experimentally measure the extent to which a system is conscious. As such, it has the potential to answer questions that once seemed impossible, like “which is more conscious, a bat or a beetle?” The decline and demise of the mystical As more of the natural world is described objectively and empirically, belief in the existence of anything that defies current scientific explanation is fading at a faster rate than ever before. This is because modern science has achieved impeccable performance when it comes to explaining phenomena previously thought to be unexplainable. That’s right.
The lunar cycle: effects on human and animal behavior and physiology.
Everything You Wanted To Know About Microdosing (But Were Afraid To Ask) | HuffPost
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Genomic Loopholes and Other Weapons - Issue 6: Secret Codes Back in 2000, before MRSA—Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus—had become a household word, Nobel Laureate Joshua Lederberg wrote in the journal Science that “the future of humanity and microbes [would] likely unfold as episodes of a suspense thriller that could be titled Our Wits Versus Their Genes.” Thirteen years later, it is “their genes” that seem to be winning out. In the United States alone, roughly 2 million people suffer from drug-resistant infections each year; according to the most recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report, about 23,000 of them die. While the microbes have cracked almost all of our codes—rapidly evolving around one drug after another—we have yet to fully crack many of theirs. Scientists have a growing understanding of the molecular wizardry by which bacteria develop resistance to antibiotics, but they have yet to circumvent it. Antibiotics are, by far, the greatest weapon we humans have had in this contest. Genomic Loopholes and Other Weapons - Issue 6: Secret Codes
Material Science

Research from Murdoch University could one day turn sandcastles into livable homes / Image: Istockphoto These are just two possibilities presented by a new treatment for sand pioneered by Murdoch University’s Dr Ralf Cord-Ruwisch. The treatment alters the consistency of sand, doing anything from solidifying it slightly to changing it into a substance as hard as marble. “Hopefully it will be civil engineering technology,” says Dr Cord-Ruwisch. “We can say ‘this sand is too soft’, and then we can make it harder. There are many potential applications for this product, says Dr Cord-Ruwisch, with a number of industries already indicating their interest. “It could be used as a mining application,” he says. “It doesn't need oxygenation. “Countries like Holland also have shown interest in solidifying their dikes. “While dikes made from sand are long lasting, there are certain risks if water intrudes into the dike sand and lubricates the sand particles so they start shifting against each other. From sandcastles to solid rock From sandcastles to solid rock
Microbial CaCO3 precipitation for the production of biocement Whiffin, Victoria S. (2004) Microbial CaCO3 precipitation for the production of biocement. PhD thesis, Murdoch University. The hydrolysis of urea by the widely distributed enzyme urease is special in that it is one of the few biologically occurring reactions that can generate carbonate ions without an associated production of protons. When this hydrolysis occurs in a calcium-rich environment, calcite (calcium carbonate) precipitates from solution forming a solid-crystalline material. The biocementation capability of two suitable strains was compared. Urease was the most expensive component of the cementation process and cost-efficient production was desired, thus an economic growth procedure was developed for large-scale cultivation of S. pasteurii. The performance of urease in whole S. pasteurii cells was evaluated under biocementation conditions (i.e. presence of high concentrations of urea, Ca2+, NH4 +/NH3, NO3 - and Cl- ions). Downloads per month over past year
Scientists turn sand to stone Research from Murdoch University could one day turn sandcastles into livable homes using the new technology. Image: iStockphoto Imagine being able to make spray-on roads across the desert, or being able to take a sandcastle home from the beach in the form of a solid rock sculpture. These are just two possibilities presented by a new treatment for sand pioneered by Murdoch University’s Dr Ralf Cord-Ruwisch. The treatment alters the consistency of sand, doing anything from solidifying it slightly to changing it into a substance as hard as marble. “Hopefully it will be civil engineering technology,” says Dr Cord-Ruwisch. “We can say ‘this sand is too soft’, and then we can make it harder. There are many potential applications for this product, says Dr Cord-Ruwisch, with a number of industries already indicating their interest. “It could be used as a mining application,” he says. “It doesn't need oxygenation. “Countries like Holland also have shown interest in solidifying their dikes. Scientists turn sand to stone
I am thrilled to have Rebecca from ThirteenRedShoes back with us today. She has a great list of app recommendations for the young scientists in our lives. Mariah asked me to put together a post on science apps available for children. Here are some great new apps that I have encountered recently. Please do leave the links to new applications in the area of science that you have found, as I would love to see more. This is an area that Master R loves and therefore we are always on the look out for new and engaging applications. Here are my top science finds for little ones ages four and above: Planets – This application, which is universal, therefore available for both iPhone and iPad, is very clever. Make sure to check out Rebecca’s other app recommendations in the posts below (click on the photo)… The name Thirteen Red Shoes came about a few years ago when Rebecca needed a business name quickly for some tutoring she was doing. Know someone else who would enjoy this activity? 9 Apps for Young Scientists · Playful Learning 9 Apps for Young Scientists · Playful Learning
rkboard Connections: Move to Learn in Science! rkboard Connections: Move to Learn in Science! Brain research supports the need for students to get plenty of movement throughout the day - but that's something every teacher knows! In Teaching with the Brain in Mind, Eric Jensen states, "Brain-compatible learning means that educators should weave math, movement, geography, social skills, role play, science, and physical education together." I completely agree, and that's why I enjoyed using simulations and role-playing games in my classroom. One day my students were stuck inside due to the winter weather, and I made up a game where the kids pretended to be molecules and they moved according to the changes in states of matter. Solids - Molecules are tightly packed and move slowly, staying in a rigid formation. Here's a simple visual I found online: States of Matter Game To start the game, I asked everyone to stand up, find a spot on the floor, and then move as I guided them through the states of matter.
No matter what middle school science lesson you're teaching, there's a game for it on the Legends of Learning platform. Each of the 90 different learning objectives for Earth and Space, Life, and Physical Sciences lessons already has or will soon have 10 games. There are no obligations, and you get $300 worth of complimentary games to start. With 900 games, we can say with confidence that there's a game for every lesson. Every game makes mundane tasks like test review easy and even fun. The games are designed to fit within a conventional class period, so they're easy to incorporate into your lesson plans. We know it can be hard to visualize 90 learning objectives. As a bonus, teachers who launch a playlist and use the games in class earn their own Legends of Learning cape. A Game for Every Lesson - Legends of Learning A Game for Every Lesson - Legends of Learning
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Info Science

Information as self-organized complexity; a unifying viewpoint Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Conceptions of Library and Information Science—"Featuring the Future" David Bawden City University, London, EC1V 0HB Introduction "The seemingly empty space around us is seething with information. This short paper presents an approach to a theoretical framework for understanding information in the physical, biological and human domains. This short paper draws on a more extensive and more fully argued and referenced study (Organized complexity, meaning and understanding: an approach to a unified view of information for information science, Aslib Proceedings, in press 2007). Three authors in particular have proposed approaches to the idea of a unified view of information, albeit in very different ways: Tom Stonier, Andrew Madden, and Marcia Bates. Stonier (1990, 1992, 1997) made one of the first detailed attempts to unify the concept of information in the physical, biological and human domains. Information in the physical domain Information as self-organized complexity; a unifying viewpoint
Introduction Information science is distinguished from other fields by its unabashed focus on the human component of information, its production, its distribution and its use (Beam, 1983; Buckland, 2012; Kline, 2006; Saracevic, 1992, 1999; Wegner, 1983). However, though successful attempts have been made to incorporate user-centred and human friendly systems, the system movement has only taken more resilient and subtle forms behind the façade of modern day systems such as social media, e-books, emails, social networks, digital libraries, second life, e-learning, cloud computing, etc., making the effects of technologies upon humans more systemic and restrictive than ever before. For much of the literature, the information sources or systems have remained the premier focus of research (Case, 2012). Digital divide and access to information and communication technologies. Problem statement Literature review Individuality characterises humans in their everyday behaviour. Methodology Results A new direction in information science research: making information science a human science A new direction in information science research: making information science a human science
(And he would have been rather silly if he had.) Aaron Sloman School of Computer Science, The University of Birmingham, UK This file is Also available as a PDF file (derived from HTML): Installed: 22 Jan 2011 Last updated: 24 Jan 2011; Reformatted May 2015; minor changes Apr 2016 Background What follows is based on section 2.3 of this book chapter: Aaron Sloman, What's information, for an organism or intelligent machine? These ideas are central to the Turing-inspired Meta-Morphogenesis project: CONTENTS Introduction: the Myth What Bateson Actually Wrote Introduction: the Myth What Bateson Actually Wrote Comments, criticisms and suggestions welcome. Information is not a difference
Mitosis and Meiosis Crossword Puzzle by Science from Murf LLC This is a mitosis and meiosis crossword puzzle with word bank and answer key. This crossword contains 16 clues. A word bank can be provided or removed to make the crossword more or less challenging. Please read the questions below or view the .pdf sample file. Also included are hundreds of PowerPoint Previews, bundled homework, and lesson notes from my DNA and Genetics Unit that I offer on TpT. DNA and Genetics Entire Unit (3,500 Slides) on TpTDNA and Genetics Unit, Cell Division This unit includes all of the lessons below in one organized folder.... Entire Curriculum that I offer on TpT Entire 4 year Science Curriculum, 20 Full Units (50,000 Slides) HW, Notes, and much more Answers: Anaphase, Cancer, Centromere, chromosomes, CrossingOver, Cytokinesis, Diploid, Half, Haploid, Interphase, Meiosis, Metaphase, Mitosis, NuclearMembrane, Prophase, Reduction, Telophase Across: 1 - These are not visible in the cell during interphase 3 - An Egg has 23 chromosomes. Best wishes,
Science Talk

Science & Technology

Peter: So Sarah, tell me, you're teaching right now, could you give me your opinion on computer use in the classroom, like using it in your classes, what do you think about that? Sarah: I think it's good when there's certain activities that are related to using computers. But when you're trying to do an activity that's not on a computer in a classroom that has computers, it's very difficult to get your students' attention because they're often distracted by doing something else on the internet, they shouldn't be doing. Peter: Oh, I totally agree, I often have that problem, it feels like I'm speaking to a crowd of ghosts. I have no idea that they're talking to me or looking at me or doing anything that they should be doing, so it's really hard. Sarah: Yeah. Peter: Ah, that's a frustrating topic. Sarah: Oh, that's good, yeah. Peter: Yeah. Sarah: Yeah, some of my students use it for ... they have a dictionary on there that they use. Sarah: Yeah. Peter: Yeah, I probably would agree with that. ELLLO Views #1265 Computers in Class
ELLLO Views #84 Favorite Gadget Aki / Japan My favorite gadget's the computer. I can't live without Internet or e-mailing or skyping. I always talk with my friends over Skype, domestic and international. Lindsay / United States My favorite gadget is the cell phone. Shalini / Canada To tell you the the truth, I'm not much of a gadget person, however this little eight gigabyte hard-drive thing that I have here has really come in handy. Lori / Canada I'm not really all that fond of electronic gadgets but I guess the only one I use regularly now is my cellphone in Japan. Tom / United States I really love this electric hotpot I have. Jeff / Canada My favorite gadget is a handheld game system that I just got, but I didn't buy it for the games.
Perturbation (astronomy) - Wikipedia
Perturbation (astronomy) - Wikipedia
Tidal acceleration - Wikipedia
Data Science

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BIO SCIENCE