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Digital Portfolios: The Art of Reflection. Too often, conversations about digital portfolios center on the tools: how to save, share, and publish student work.

Digital Portfolios: The Art of Reflection

Mastering the technical component of digital portfolios is critical, and students do need an opportunity to showcase their work to a broader audience. However, when we let the process of curate > reflect > publish serve as the sole focal point, digital portfolios become summative in nature and are viewed as an add-on at the end of a unit, project, or activity. For digital portfolios to be truly valuable to both teachers and students, they need to provide insight into not only what students created, but also how and why. If the ultimate goal is to develop students as learners, then they need an opportunity for making connections to content as well as the overarching learning objectives.

Electronic Portfolios a Decade into the Twenty-first Century: What We Know, What We Need to Know. During the last decade, campuses designing electronic portfolios have used them both in curricular and assessment contexts.

Electronic Portfolios a Decade into the Twenty-first Century: What We Know, What We Need to Know

And in many campus e-portfolio projects, diverse stakeholders—faculty, staff, students, potential employers, and members of the public—have participated in the design and review of e-portfolios. Such electronic portfolios have included a range of exhibits, from multimedia artifacts and reflective commentary to artifacts-as-evidence linking to institutionally sanctioned programmatic outcomes and to more personalized self-identified outcomes. In sum, these e-portfolios have provided a new, continuing mechanism both for documenting specific practices and student accomplishments and the effects of that these activities have on learning outcomes. What We Know The literature on e-portfolios suggests that student engagement is a critical element of portfolio development (Barrett 2000; Batson 2002; Yancey 2001). In making such observations, Josh is not alone.

Conclusion. Portfolios hold new promise for schools. The 3,000 students in rural Maine’s Regional School Unit 19 begin compiling electronic portfolios of their schoolwork in pre-K, when the district issues every child a Google account.

Portfolios hold new promise for schools

In the elementary years, teachers snap and upload digital photos of handwritten work. In the upper grades, students accustomed to electronically documenting their school lives habitually upload essays and lab reports and record video of their oral presentations. “By the time you hit middle school, the students are just doing it because that’s the way we do business,” says Kern Kelley, the Maine district’s technology integrator. Decades ago, portfolio assessment—using samples of classroom work to document students’ progress toward learning goals—meant finding room for bulging binders stuffed with paper.

But digital technologies that make it far easier to collect, curate, share and store student work have dismantled the physical barriers that once made portfolio assessment daunting. Defense portfolio rubric. Website design rubric. Personal Goals: An Exercise in Student Self-Assessment. This summer I am reading Linda Nilson’s book Creating Self-Regulated Learners: Strategies to Strengthen Students’ Self-Awareness and Learning Skills, which offers instructors a wealth of assignments and activities to help students grow their self-regulation and metacognitive abilities.

Personal Goals: An Exercise in Student Self-Assessment

Teaching students how to learn well on their own and to evaluate that learning is a goal I have been pursuing for the past few years, and I am convinced that occasional, brief self-assessment exercises can help college students perform better as well as understand the learning process. I teach Spanish, and over the years I’ve noticed that as language students move to higher levels of the curriculum and higher levels of proficiency, they are able to identify the content (grammar, vocabulary) and skills (narration, speculation, speaking on abstract topics) that are most challenging to master. How ePortfolios Can Prepare K-12 Students for College, and Beyond. With the Common Core State Standards emphasis on 21st century skills, as well as the expectation that today’s workers are technically savvy when they enter the workforce, career and college readiness in the K-12 classroom is more important than ever.

How ePortfolios Can Prepare K-12 Students for College, and Beyond

One way teachers can prepare students for life after high school is through the use of electronic portfolios, or ePortfolios. In this article, we’ll take a look at what constitutes an ePortfolio, as well as three main ways ePortfolios support career and college readiness in the K-12 classroom. What is an ePortfolio? ePortfolio Levels (K-12 Schools) - ePortfolios with GoogleApps. Levels of ePortfolio Development in K-12 Schools Most of the research on the implementation of electronic portfolios has been in higher eduction.

ePortfolio Levels (K-12 Schools) - ePortfolios with GoogleApps

Most of the customized e-portfolio tools, both commercial and open source, have been created in and for higher education, whereas the paper-based portfolio process itself began in K-12 schools. Over the last eight years, there has been a decline in the use of paper portfolios in schools, perhaps due to the dominance of high stakes standardized testing, even though the integration of technology has boomed. Should high school students have to 'defend' their diploma like a Ph.D? LOS ANGELES — Looking smart in a blue button-down shirt, Jorge Magana, 18, zipped through a PowerPoint presentation with the confidence of a Fortune 500 CEO.

Should high school students have to 'defend' their diploma like a Ph.D?

Seated in front of Magana in a classroom at Los Angeles High School of the Arts was a panel of three judges: the school’s assistant principal, a school coordinator, and a former student. The occasion was his senior defense. Magana was trying to convince the panel that he was ready to graduate. He had 45 minutes to present a portfolio of three “artifacts,” one academic, one artistic, and one of his own choosing. The panel grilled him: Can you describe your research process? Portfolio assessments like this one, which look a lot like doctoral dissertation defenses, are on the rise in California. Since 1999, California has primarily tied school rankings to test scores, using the Academic Performance Index (API).

Related: Stakes for “high-stakes” tests are actually pretty low Magana’s presentation seemed to come off smoothly. Nureva Troove digital portfolio webinars. E-Portfolios Link Academic Achievements to Career Success. E-Portfolios E-Portfolios Link Academic Achievements to Career Success Portland State University's new online business degree program is using e-portfolios to document students' academic and professional growth.

E-Portfolios Link Academic Achievements to Career Success

By Dian Schaffhauser06/17/15 When the School of Business at Portland State University launched a brand new online business degree program focused on leadership and management for working professionals, the intent was to experiment with new kinds of learning to enhance students' professional, academic and career development. Looking for a way to link students' academic achievements to career success, the school turned to e-portfolios as a key component in the program. Here's how Portland State wove e-portfolios into the curriculum from the ground up. Growing an Online Program. Digital Portfolios: The Art of Reflection. Too often, conversations about digital portfolios center on the tools: how to save, share, and publish student work.

Digital Portfolios: The Art of Reflection

Mastering the technical component of digital portfolios is critical, and students do need an opportunity to showcase their work to a broader audience. However, when we let the process of curate > reflect > publish serve as the sole focal point, digital portfolios become summative in nature and are viewed as an add-on at the end of a unit, project, or activity. For digital portfolios to be truly valuable to both teachers and students, they need to provide insight into not only what students created, but also how and why. If the ultimate goal is to develop students as learners, then they need an opportunity for making connections to content as well as the overarching learning objectives. Credly. The Electronic Portfolio Development Process. Electronic Portfolios = Multimedia Development + Portfolio DevelopmentThe Electronic Portfolio Development Process © 1999,2000, Helen C.

The Electronic Portfolio Development Process

Barrett, Ph.D. The process of developing electronic teaching portfolios can document evidence of teacher competencies and guide long-term professional development. The competencies may be locally defined, or linked to national teaching standards. Two primary assumptions in this process are: 1.) a portfolio is not a haphazard collection of artifacts (i.e., a scrapbook) but rather a reflective tool which demonstrates growth over time; and 2.) as we move to more standards-based teacher performance assessment, we need new tools to record and organize evidence of successful teaching, for both practicing professionals and student teachers.

Benefits of Electronic Portfolio Development 1. 3. You will know you are ready for the next stage when: You have selected the artifacts that are going into your formal or presentation portfolio. . © 2000, Helen C. How Do Digital Portfolios Help Students? About ETR Community. Using E-Portfolios in the Classroom. For decades, students have been completing assignments in school. Often, these were seen only by the teacher, graded and returned to the student. Sometimes, the work was posted on a classroom wall or in a school hallway. Many teachers kept portfolios of student work for report card conferences, and the rare teacher taught students how to build their own portfolios from their work.

With more and more schools going paperless or migrating to the "cloud" (storing files on the Internet), student work has become more easily shareable, accessible by many, and more easily organized. Why ePortfolios? ​‘Picture This’: A Step by Step Guide on Digital Learning Portfolios in the Classroom. It’s hard to talk about “Digital Learning Portfolios” without really knowing what they are. At the Dreamyard Project, a collaboration between the Bronx’s Dreamyard Preparatory School and the Parsons New School of Design, this illustration below is what we think it is, and what we all agree that a digital portfolio should be. I had the lucky fortune to be involved in this collaborative project, and played a role in making this happen at my particular school.

My name is Rudy Blanco, I am the Digital Learning Coordinator at the Dreamyard Preparatory School and I’m here to share my big takeaways with you. The 3 Types of Digital Portfolios Teachers should Know about. Model - K-12 - ePortfolios with GoogleApps. ePortfolio tutorial. ePortfolio Step-by-Step Process - ePortfolios with GoogleApps. Portfolios for Student Growth. Authentic Assessment Toolbox. Portfolios What is a Portfolio? Are Portfolios Authentic Assessments? Why use Portfolios? How do you Create a Portfolio Assignment? Purpose: What is the purpose(s) of the portfolio? Note: My focus will be on portfolios of student work rather than teacher portfolios or other types.

Portfolios: More than a file folder. Types of Portfolios. A Taxonomy of Reflection: A Model for Critical Thinking. My approach to staff development (and teaching) borrows from the thinking of Donald Finkel who believed that teaching should be thought of as “providing experience, provoking reflection.”