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For Syrian refugees, smartphones are a lifeline — not a toy. There are poignant images of child migrants sleeping on cardboard in the streets of Greece, or their parents being beaten by Macedonian riot police.

For Syrian refugees, smartphones are a lifeline — not a toy

And then there are the photos of beaming youth, fresh off the rubber dinghy from Turkey, toting smartphones and grouping together for a selfie. As the Mediterranean refugee crisis deepens, those latter pictures have raised eyebrows among skeptics in the apparent belief that people fleeing conflict must be squalid and poor. "Are these happy young men really timid souls fleeing war and persecution? They aren't quite the heart-rending image of dishevelled, traumatized refugees fleeing the horrors of their war-torn home country one might expect," blared Britain's Express tabloid. "Poverty stricken Syrian migrant takes selfie with her $600 smartphone," claimed a tweeter going by the handle DefendWallSt, under a photo — which some have called a hoax — of a woman in a lifejacket and headscarf snapping a pic of herself. How smartphones are helping refugees in Europe.

Alkis Konstantinidis | Reuters A Syrian refugee, from Kobani, carries her baby as she arrives with other Syrian refugees on a dinghy on the island of Lesbos, Greece August 23, 2015.

How smartphones are helping refugees in Europe

Greece, mired in its worst economic crisis in generations, has been found largely unprepared for a mass influx of refugees, mainly Syrians. Arrivals have exceeded 160,000 this year, three times as high as in 2014. A photo project by the IRC, called What's in my bag, documents what possessions refugees and migrants have brought with them. Surprised that Syrian refugees have smartphones? Sorry to break this to you, but you're an idiot - Comment - Voices.

“Hey, those people fleeing war in Syria aren’t poor at all!

Surprised that Syrian refugees have smartphones? Sorry to break this to you, but you're an idiot - Comment - Voices

Look, they all have smartphones!” Is one increasingly tedious complaint that has been bubbling away on social media recently. Owning a mobile phone, it seems, should render one ineligible for help when trying to stop themselves and their families from dying in a war. On the surface this may look like xenophobia searching for something to grab on to following a shift in the public mood towards refugees from the Middle East. But it is actually a fairly progressive stance: just weeks ago the anti-immigration brigade were complaining that migrants are unskilled and just want our benefits. People are outraged to see refugees with smartphones. They shouldn't be. There's a lot of outrage on the Internet about migrants coming ashore and immediately taking selfies.

People are outraged to see refugees with smartphones. They shouldn't be.

You seriously do not want to read the comments in the Daily Express after the site ran a story under a photo of smiling Syrian refugees with phones on selfie sticks. This particular tweet, showing a woman taking a selfie when she reaches land, is doing the rounds of anti-immigrant websites, and is considered proof that these are rich people, "economic migrants" rather than real victims of tragedy. Personally, I think the first thing I would do if I got off an inflatable dinghy after a long trip like that is take a selfie of myself and my kid to prove that I'd made it.

See How Smartphones Have Become a Lifeline for Refugees. How technology is affecting the refugee crisis. A Mercy Corps staffer helps a Syrian refugee find directions to a nearby camp using a map application on his smartphone.

How technology is affecting the refugee crisis

Mobile phones help refugees who are seeking safety in Europe find lifesaving information about their journey. Photo: Karine Aigner for Mercy Corps. University for all – Calais – Educating without borders: UEL and friends in Calais and beyond. European refugee higher education opportunities: Higher education for refugees in Europe: Some information.

University for all – Calais – Educating without borders: UEL and friends in Calais and beyond

Media coverage of ‘University for all’: Times Higher: ‘University for all’ Calais refugee library flooded with thousands of books. The makeshift library providing books to refugees in the Calais camp known as the Jungle has been inundated with books and emails of support, following a Guardian article about it.

Calais refugee library flooded with thousands of books

Jungle Books has now “more than enough” books to go around, and its creator, British teacher Mary Jones, is trying to redirect help to where it is most needed. “People have been brilliant, and a lot are coming over with their cars full of things, including books,” Jones told the Guardian. She added: “The library is so small, and also the types of books people are looking for are not necessarily the ones people are sending.” Jungle Books Library – Calais – Educating without borders: UEL and friends in Calais and beyond. Jungle Books Library was started by Mary Jones in collaboration with camp residents.

Jungle Books Library – Calais – Educating without borders: UEL and friends in Calais and beyond

It now includes a library, a classroom, a women’s and children’s centre, and a radio station, Radio Jungala (Radio Jungle-No!) : About Classroom - Classroom Help. Easy setup—Teachers set up a class, invite students and co-teachers, and then share information—assignments, announcements, and questions—in the class stream.

About Classroom - Classroom Help

Less time and paper—The simple, paperless assignment workflow allows teachers to manage student work quickly, all in one place. Better organization—Students can see assignments on the Work page, in the class stream, or on the class calendar. All class materials are automatically filed into Google Drive folders. Enhanced communication—Teachers can create assignments, send announcements, and start class discussions instantly. 4a1d5ba36. Evaluation of Child Friendly Spaces: Research Report. Guidelines for Child-Friendly Spaces. Building a Future for the Youngest Refugees. By Sarah Dryden-Peterson Sarah Dryden-Peterson is an assistant professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Building a Future for the Youngest Refugees

This post is adapted from remarks delivered at a gathering of State Department policymakers in Washington, DC. Theconversation. Germany has seen a massive influx of migrants since opening its borders to refugees from war-torn countries in Africa and the Middle East. This year alone it is estimated more than 300,000 people have entered the country. We are physicians working at the refugee camps in Dresden, the capital of Saxony, which has accommodated 41,000 refugees this year alone. A volunteer staff of around 200 local physicians and student aides provides medical care for the refugees.