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Calais Jungle

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UNHCR - UNHCR: France decision to close Calais 'jungle' camp welcome; Proper care in next steps crucial. 14 October 2016 | Français | عربي Earlier this month France’s President Francois Hollande announced that the informal camp for refugees and migrants in Calais, the so-called “Jungle,” will be closed in the coming days, with the camp population to be moved to centres where better help can be provided.

UNHCR - UNHCR: France decision to close Calais 'jungle' camp welcome; Proper care in next steps crucial

This is welcome. The Calais authorities estimate that some 6,000 people are staying at the camp. It is vital that they be moved in a planned and organized manner, and that proper alternative accommodation is found for them around the country. Q&A: what happens now to the Calais refugees? Where are they going?

Q&A: what happens now to the Calais refugees?

Sixty buses will move the refugees and migrants to 164 reception centres across France. The accommodation centres, which are intended to be temporary, will each hold 40 to 50 people for up to four months while their asylum cases are examined. Those who do not claim asylum will be sent back to their country of origin. Almost two-thirds of those surveyed in the camp have said they do not want to be evicted and taken to French accommodation, while one-third say they will continue to try to get to the UK, according to the Refugee Rights Data Project.

Hundreds leave Calais by bus on first day of operation to clear refugee camp. Hundreds of migrants and refugees have left Calais on buses for accommodation centres elsewhere in France on the first day of an operation to clear and then demolish the refugee camp in the northern port town.

Hundreds leave Calais by bus on first day of operation to clear refugee camp

Queues of people carrying their few possessions, some in donated holdalls, had begun forming before dawn outside a warehouse where processing took place. As the gates opened people surged towards the warehouse, with no idea where they were to be taken but having been warned they must leave or risk arrest and deportation. Calais children expected in Britain ‘within days’ Only The Hardest Of Hearts Could Ignore These Syrian Kids' Hopes For Peace. Syrian teenager met by cheers in London after months in Calais limbo. Omar’s journey from Syria to Europe included a trip in a tiny boat from Turkey, a trek across Europe and months in legal limbo alone in the Calais refugee camp, waiting for his chance to cross safely to his extended family in the UK.

Syrian teenager met by cheers in London after months in Calais limbo

Arriving at St Pancras station in London on Thursday, with a small backpack and a shy smile, the 17-year-old was almost overwhelmed by the significance of the moment. He was greeted with cheers as he walked into the cafe where the volunteers and lawyers who had helped him through the gruelling legal process waited for him. He is the 50th child refugee to arrive in the UK under the EU’s Dublin regulation, brought over by Safe Passage, an organisation run by Citizens UK to lobby and make legal representation on refugee children’s behalf. His cousin Abdullah, one of the first family members he has seen in almost a year, stood protectively at his shoulder. UNHCR - UNHCR: France decision to close Calais 'jungle' camp welcome; Proper care in next steps crucial.

Families speak of their joy at being reunited with Calais children. The brother of a child migrant coming from Calais to the UK said it will be a "blessing" to have him back.

Families speak of their joy at being reunited with Calais children

Asif Khan, 25, fled Afghanistan to come to the UK 11 years ago, but his younger brother Aimal, 14, stayed behind. Six months ago, his sibling made it to Calais, but had not yet made the final leg of his journey across the Channel to be reunited with his brother. Now he is one of 14 migrant children who have been brought into the country to join their families. Asif, who works as a chef, told the Press Association: "I really appreciate this. It was a blessing to receive him from there - I'm really happy. New Calais census released - 761 children in Calais 'Jungle', 80% on their own - Help Refugees. Data collected by our teams on the ground reveals that at the time of census-taking there were 7,037 people living in the camp in Calais, a 15% increase in population since last month.

New Calais census released - 761 children in Calais 'Jungle', 80% on their own - Help Refugees

To see an increase this great during the Holy Month of Ramadan was unexpected and if people continue to arrive in Calais at this rate, we estimate that there will be 10,000 people temporarily residing there by September. There are 761 children living in the "Jungle" and of these 608 are unaccompanied. The youngest of these unaccompanied minors is just 8 years old and the youngest child is 4 months old.

The government-run facilities are at capacity with 1500 people living in the containers and 230 in the Jules Ferry Centre, the latter only accommodating women and their children. Log In. Photo Thousands of migrants have crowded into a makeshift camp near the port city of Calais, France, close to the entrance to the tunnel underneath the English Channel.

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Residents of the camp have used it as a staging ground to hop onto trucks and trains bound for Britain. Migrants have used the tunnel as a transit point for years, but they are doing so in greater numbers this summer — and taking greater risks. Ten people have died trying to cross the Channel since June, according to Médecins du Monde, and the crisis has created long delays and a political uproar. Katrin Bennhold, a reporter for The New York Times based in London, recently visited Calais for an article about the crisis, and she provides answers to some of the top questions readers are asking about Calais. 3,000 migrant camp in Calais, France. Makeshift tarpaulin roofs flap in the breeze, stretched over tree branches and doing little to keep out the elements.

3,000 migrant camp in Calais, France

A pile of rotting potatoes leaves an acrid stench hanging in the air. Men sit on plastic chairs in the sand, huddled around a generator, all charging their mobile phones. A woeful Arabic song plays out from the tinny speakers of one man's phone. Many of these men call home and tell their families life is good in Europe, sparing their loved ones the grim truth: They all came here to reach England, but for now this is their home. There’s nascent hope in the Calais ‘Jungle’ camp. So why destroy it? A fortnight ago I returned from my second trip to the Calais “Jungle” migrant camp.

There’s nascent hope in the Calais ‘Jungle’ camp. So why destroy it?

So much has happened in the couple of months between visits – but the amazing response of British volunteers, and the stark contrast with the brutality of the French state and indifference of the British government, has left a lasting impression. Conditions in Calais still fall well short of UN minimum standards, but there is a visible reduction in the extreme suffering I saw on my first trip. Because of British volunteers the kitchen we worked at is in a much better state. 1 hour to get out: France bulldozes Calais ‘Jungle’ mosque, church & school. French authorities have bulldozed a mosque, a church and a school, which stood in the buffer zone between the Calais ‘Jungle’ refugee camp and a public road, as residents scrambled to rescue possessions.

1 hour to get out: France bulldozes Calais ‘Jungle’ mosque, church & school

The Calais prefecture gave volunteers and residents one hour to clear out shelters in the church compound before tearing down the remaining structures Monday morning. Volunteer teams were working to dismantle the shelters before they were demolished by the bulldozers, the group Help Refugees wrote in a Facebook post. “Our teams (Help Refugees/L’Auberge) quickly working to dismantle & move shelters, mostly occupied by single women.

The Police out in force. Log In. Log In Don't have an account? Sign up here » Facebook Google or. Calais Jungle - Wikipedia. The Calais Jungle was a refugee and migrant encampment in the vicinity of Calais, France. Many living in this camp attempt to illegally enter the United Kingdom via the Port of Calais or the Eurotunnel by stowing away on lorries, ferries, cars, or trains traveling to the UK.[2] The camp gained global attention during the European refugee and migrant crisis when the population of the camp grew and French authorities carried out evictions. The French evacuated 6,400 migrants from the encampment in 170 buses, starting on 24 October 2016, with the intent of resettling the migrants in different regions of France.[3] On 26 October 2016, French authorities announced that the camp had been cleared.