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Aid in reverse: how poor countries develop rich countries. We have long been told a compelling story about the relationship between rich countries and poor countries.

Aid in reverse: how poor countries develop rich countries

The story holds that the rich nations of the OECD give generously of their wealth to the poorer nations of the global south, to help them eradicate poverty and push them up the development ladder. Yes, during colonialism western powers may have enriched themselves by extracting resources and slave labour from their colonies – but that’s all in the past. These days, they give more than $125bn (£102bn) in aid each year – solid evidence of their benevolent goodwill. I'm an American living in Sweden. Here's why I came to embrace the higher taxes. I was visiting the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, a 23-island archipelago in Lake Superior, when suddenly I found myself pining for Stockholm.

I'm an American living in Sweden. Here's why I came to embrace the higher taxes.

Why? Because standing on the boat dock in Bayfield, Wisconsin, I realized that the 23,000-island Stockholm archipelago is more accessible to me, an American, than my own 23-island national park. These wilderness islands with haunting sea caves are accessible only by tour boat at a cost of $151 for a family of two adults and three children. There is no free 15-minute ride across the strait to Basswood Island closest to the mainland, nor a $10 shuttle between the islands, as there would be in Sweden where a heavily subsidized ferry system makes the Stockholm archipelago available to all citizens — as well as to American tourists. Swedish taxes are easy to pay, rational, and efficient. Politics is crippling the US economy, Harvard study says.

Despite somewhat encouraging news this week that the middle and lower-wage workers appeared to see relief in 2015 as the US median household income finally rose, most Americans are much worse off than they were two decades ago.

Politics is crippling the US economy, Harvard study says

This is not the product of the natural dips and bumps that typically punctuate our economy. According to a study released Thursday by Harvard Business School, the biggest threat to US competitiveness is our crippled political system and the “unrealistic and ineffective national discourse on the reality of the challenges facing the U.S. economy,” study authors reported. “A lot of people think that what’s going in is we had a bad recession and that we’re just recovering,” Michael Porter, a study author and co-chair of Harvard’s Competitiveness Project, which conducts an annual survey of US business leaders, tells CNBC. Millions for One Bank and a Disaster for Food, Water and Climate. Construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline continues near St.

Millions for One Bank and a Disaster for Food, Water and Climate

Anthony, an unincorporated community in Morton County, North Dakota, October 8, 2016. Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative - Questions and Answers. Last Updated: August 05, 2013 Introduction.

Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative - Questions and Answers

The Political Economy of Predatory Capitalism. Crash course. THE collapse of Lehman Brothers, a sprawling global bank, in September 2008 almost brought down the world’s financial system.

Crash course

It took huge taxpayer-financed bail-outs to shore up the industry. Even so, the ensuing credit crunch turned what was already a nasty downturn into the worst recession in 80 years. Massive monetary and fiscal stimulus prevented a buddy-can-you-spare-a-dime depression, but the recovery remains feeble compared with previous post-war upturns. GDP is still below its pre-crisis peak in many rich countries, especially in Europe, where the financial crisis has evolved into the euro crisis. The effects of the crash are still rippling through the world economy: witness the wobbles in financial markets as America’s Federal Reserve prepares to scale back its effort to pep up growth by buying bonds. With half a decade’s hindsight, it is clear the crisis had multiple causes.

Start with the folly of the financiers. From houses to money markets. Free Trade Explained In An Excellent Comic. By Michael Goodwin, Illustrated by Dan E.

Free Trade Explained In An Excellent Comic

Burr / economixcomix.com/ Oct 12, 2014 The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) are the latest in a long line of international free trade agreements. Neoliberalism – the ideology at the root of all our problems. Imagine if the people of the Soviet Union had never heard of communism.

Neoliberalism – the ideology at the root of all our problems

The ideology that dominates our lives has, for most of us, no name. Mention it in conversation and you’ll be rewarded with a shrug. Even if your listeners have heard the term before, they will struggle to define it. Neoliberalism: do you know what it is? Its anonymity is both a symptom and cause of its power. Apps. 25 Images of Markets "Regulating Themselves" 2014 Oxfam report "85 people own more than the poorest 3.5 billion people on the planet" This statistic from Oxfam is staggering.

25 Images of Markets "Regulating Themselves"

Just 85 people, the top 0.00000001 percent, own as much as the poorest 3.5 billion people on the planet. Oxfam's concern is not only that wealth is concentrated at the top, but that it will remain this way, passed down from generation to generation like royalty. According to Nick Galasso, co-author of the report: "High levels of inequality actually corrode democratic processes. 2014 West Virginia chemical spill.