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Election 2016

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CHARTS: The Electoral College May Be Dragging Down Voter Turnout In Your State. Maryjane Medina, 18, a first time voter, walks up to polling booth to cast her vote at a polling station set-up in Los Angeles, California.

CHARTS: The Electoral College May Be Dragging Down Voter Turnout In Your State

Irfan Khan/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Irfan Khan/LA Times via Getty Images Maryjane Medina, 18, a first time voter, walks up to polling booth to cast her vote at a polling station set-up in Los Angeles, California. What do Democrats in West Virginia and Republicans in California have in common? Of course, these votes were counted, but anyone with a minimal knowledge of U.S. politics could have guessed that California would vote Democratic in the presidential election (Clinton won it by 29 points) and that West Virginia would go Republican (Trump won by nearly 42 points). Clinton staffers on why she lost Michigan, Wisconsin. Donald Trump Huddles With Mike Pence During Tumultuous Transition. Trump’s Election Upends Agenda for Obama’s Last Foreign Trip - Bloomberg Politics. Donald Trump’s election has changed the nature of President Barack Obama’s final foreign trip as commander in chief, a two-continent journey that he expected to be an amicable farewell to the leaders of more than two dozen countries.

Trump’s Election Upends Agenda for Obama’s Last Foreign Trip - Bloomberg Politics

Obama leaves this evening for Greece, Germany and Peru, a trip that would once have served as a tidy narrative symbolizing the handover of U.S. power to a like-minded fellow Democrat, Hillary Clinton. Instead, after Trump’s victory on Nov. 8, Obama must reassure the world of something he may not quite believe himself: that the billionaire real estate developer and reality TV star will be ready to lead the free world by his Jan. 20 inauguration, and that America will continue to lead the way on using diplomacy to defuse international crises and on the protection of the environment.

All that Obama has accomplished in foreign affairs hangs in the balance. Read More: Iran Sanctions Redux? -- a QuickTake ‘Strong Fundamentals’ America First ‘Partnership, Not Conflict’ How Donald Trump could be the saviour of a corrupt and divided America. U.S. voters want leader to end advantage of rich and powerful: Reuters/Ipsos.

All Programs A-Z. Polls Tighten In Key Battlegrounds, But Clinton Leads Trump In Electoral Map Before Election Day. Election Day is nearly upon us.

Polls Tighten In Key Battlegrounds, But Clinton Leads Trump In Electoral Map Before Election Day

So where does the electoral map stand? It's a close race, with Hillary Clinton retaining a broad and consistent but shallow advantage, according to the final NPR Battleground Map. Compared with a couple of weeks ago, when Clinton hit her peak lead, the race has tightened. The Neverending Race Is Coming to a Close. Then what? Finally!

The Neverending Race Is Coming to a Close. Then what?

That is the prevailing thought as this presidential election is headed for the finish line. Wanting this race to be over is certainly one of the reasons why a record number of Americans have voted early. But will it be? Sure, we will (likely) know by Wednesday who the next president will be, but, in this election, that will not provide closure. A short history lesson on presidents winning without the popular vote. Q: How many times was a president elected who did not win the popular vote?

A short history lesson on presidents winning without the popular vote

A: It has happened four times. The 2000 election was the most recent when the candidate who received the greatest number of electoral votes, and thus won the presidency, didn’t win the popular vote. But this scenario has played out in our nation’s history before. In 1824, John Quincy Adams was elected president despite not winning either the popular vote or the electoral vote. Latest Presidential Polls 2016: Why Is Hillary Clinton Losing Ground? 5 Ways Donald Trump Could Win Over Jill Stein, Gary Johnson And The Democrats. Americans who insist they will move to Canada or some other liberal bastion of freedom if Republican Donald Trump is declared the winner on Election Day should perhaps start hunting down their passports and getting their other documents in order.

Latest Presidential Polls 2016: Why Is Hillary Clinton Losing Ground? 5 Ways Donald Trump Could Win Over Jill Stein, Gary Johnson And The Democrats

While Democrat Hillary Clinton remains in the lead, a Trump victory is still a very real possibility. Here are five ways Trump could win Tuesday. 1. Gregg Jarrett: An avalanche of evidence may now bury Hillary. Americans who lived through the nightmares of both the Watergate and Lewinsky scandals recall vividly how every day seemed to produce new evidence of wrongdoing.

Gregg Jarrett: An avalanche of evidence may now bury Hillary

The drip, drip of deceptions and lies finally overflowed into a cascading pool of criminality and disgust. The first scandal culminated in Articles of Impeachment. The other an impeachment trial. Is America now hurtling toward the same political abyss? It looks like it. Election Update: Yes, Donald Trump Has A Path To Victory.

Tuesday was another pretty good day of polling for Donald Trump.

Election Update: Yes, Donald Trump Has A Path To Victory

It’s also not an easy day to characterize given the large number of polls published. You could cherry-pick and point to the poll that has Trump up 7 percentage points in North Carolina, for example, or the ABC News/Washington Post national tracking poll that has Trump up 1 point overall. And you could counter, on the Hillary Clinton side, with a poll showing her up by 11 points in Pennsylvania, or a national poll that gives her a 9-point lead. Our model takes all this data in stride, along with all the other polls that nobody pays much attention to. And it thinks the results are most consistent with a 3- or 4-percentage point national lead for Clinton, down from a lead of about 7 points in mid-October. Donald Trump's closing argument is battle cry against Hillary Clinton's corruption.

Donald Trump over the weekend delivered a closing argument against Hillary Clinton and the “totally rigged system” he says enables her — but the businessman’s presidential campaign expressed open frustration Sunday that a policy-centric message once again has been drowned out.

Donald Trump's closing argument is battle cry against Hillary Clinton's corruption

Trailing badly in virtually all polls, Mr. Trump outlined plans for his first 100 days in office during a speech in Gettysburg on Saturday. In his attempt to put the focus on issues during the home stretch of the campaign, the Republican nominee offered himself as a “once in a lifetime” agent of change to revive the economy and stamp out Washington corruption, and he drew a stark contrast between his plan and the more-of-the-same government that he said Mrs. Clinton would run to benefit herself and her cronies. But much of Mr. A Guide for Republicans Still Deciding How to Vote for President - The Atlantic.

The day of decision is nearing.

A Guide for Republicans Still Deciding How to Vote for President - The Atlantic

All the talk fades, and one mark must be made beside one box on the ballot. Many Republicans are agonizing. They reject Donald Trump; they cannot accept Hillary Clinton. What to do? I won’t conceal, I’m struggling with this question myself. Twitter Imagines 'What The Electoral Map Would Look Like If...' Trump's Twitter debate lead was 'swelled by bots' Image copyright Getty Images More than four times as many tweets were made by pro-Donald Trump bots in and around the first US presidential debate as the number made by those backing Hillary Clinton, a study found. The research indicates the Republican candidate would have enjoyed more support on Twitter even if the automated accounts had not been active. But it highlights that the software has the capacity to "manipulate public opinion" and "muddy political issues".

The report has yet to be peer-reviewed. And one critic noted that it was impossible to be completely sure which accounts were real and which were "web robots". Image copyright Twitter. Meacham: The End of Christian America. It was a small detail, a point of comparison buried in the fifth paragraph on the 17th page of a 24-page summary of the 2009 American Religious Identification Survey. But as R. Albert Mohler Jr. —president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, one of the largest on earth—read over the document after its release in March, he was struck by a single sentence. For a believer like Mohler—a starched, unflinchingly conservative Christian, steeped in the theology of his particular province of the faith, devoted to producing ministers who will preach the inerrancy of the Bible and the Gospel of Jesus Christ as the only means to eternal life—the central news of the survey was troubling enough: the number of Americans who claim no religious affiliation has nearly doubled since 1990, rising from 8 to 15 percent.

"That really hit me hard," he told me last week. Sign up Sign up to our daily newsletter for up to date global news and features. Still, in. Survey reveals what Americans fear the most. More than 1,500 people around the country were surveyed for the Chapman University Survey of American Fears. Many of their top 10 fears were elements out of their control. USA TODAY NETWORK As the presidential election campaign drags on, it may come as no surprise that corrupt government officials are one of the greatest fears many Americans have, according to a new study.

People are scared of a lot of things, ranging from terror attacks to identity theft and deaths within the family, according to the third annual Chapman University Survey of American Fears. Hillary Clinton campaign WikiLeaks emails reveal disdain for Catholics, Southerners, 'needy Latinos' Long before Hillary Clinton called millions of Americans a “basket of deplorables,” her top campaign advisers and liberal allies openly mocked Catholics, Southerners and a host of other groups, according to newly released emails that offer a stunning window into the vitriol inside the Clinton world less than a month before Election Day. The emails, published by WikiLeaks after a hack of Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta’s private account, also show Clinton campaign officials and Democratic leaders disparaging supporters of Sen. Bernard Sanders as “self-righteous” whiners, calling Hispanic party leaders such as Bill Richardson “needy Latinos,” labeling CNN anchor Jake Tapper “a d—k” and even lambasting longtime Clinton ally Sidney Blumenthal.

The sheer number of insults in the email trove has left the Clinton campaign, along with outside organizations such as the Center for American Progress that were routinely involved in the brutal bad-mouthing, unable or unwilling to respond. Mr. First Read: A Fight Over What Kind of Country the U.S. Should Be. First Read is a morning briefing from Meet the Press and the NBC Political Unit on the day's most important political stories and why they matter. Clinton vs. Trump: A fight over what kind of country the United States should be This presidential contest is turning out to be more than a battle of Democrat vs. Republican, liberal vs. conservative, blue vs. red. Instead, yesterday's dueling speeches by Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump on the Orlando shooting revealed it to be an even bigger fight over what kind of country the United States of America should be -- open, inclusive and tolerant, or closed, divided and intolerant?

Only a Democrat can stop Trump now. It's Trump: Here's what evangelicals should do now. What Google and Twitter Can Tell Us About 2016. If you were trying to figure out who would win the South Carolina primary on Saturday, you could have read the polls. Or you could have checked Google data.