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El-Sadaawi biography, work, ideas and influence

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Nawal El Saadawi. By Jennifer McBride Nawal El Saadawi is a leading Egyptian feminist, sociologist, medical doctor and militant writer on Arab women's problems. She is one of the most widely translated contemporary Egyptian writers, with her work available in twelve languages. Nawal El Saadawi was born in 1931 in Kafr Tahla, a small village outside of Cairo. El Saadawi was raised in a large household with eight brothers and sisters. Her family was relatively traditional, El Saadawi was "circumcised" at the age of six, and yet somewhat progressive, El Saadawi's father insisted that all of his children be educated.

El Saadawi describes her mother as "a potential revolutionary whose ambition was buried in her marriage. " Despite limitation imposed by both religious and colonial oppression on rural women, El Saadawi attended the University of Cairo and graduated in 1955 with a degree in psychiatry. From 1973 to 1976 she researched women and neurosis in the Ain Shams University's Faculty of Medicine. Nawal El Saadawi: Egypt's radical feminist | Life. 'I am becoming more radical with age," says Nawal El Saadawi, laughing. "I have noticed that writers, when they are old, become milder. But for me it is the opposite. Age makes me more angry. " This is a startling admission. El Saadawi already seems to have lived more lives than most. This has come at considerable cost.

Her work continues to be explosive. As El Saadawi prepares to talk about her life at a PEN literary festival on Friday, she is unrepentant. El Saadawi is "a novelist first, a novelist second, a novelist third", she says, but it is feminism that unites her work. She says she has been a feminist "since I was a child. In her first autobiography, A Daughter of Isis, she recalls her outrage when she began to realise daughters were not considered equal to sons. In that same book she writes about the horror of female circumcision. Circumcision wasn't the only horror El Saadawi faced as a child. She still refuses to tone down her work. Nawal El Saadawi: 'I am going to carry on this fight for ever' - Profiles - People. "I lay in a pool of blood. After a few days, the bleeding stopped, and the daya [midwife] peered between my thighs and said, 'All is well.

The wound has healed, thanks be to God.' But the pain was there, like an abscess in my flesh. " The 80-year-old feminist activist has been shortlisted for tomorrow's Women of the Year awards after spending the past 60 years campaigning for an end to the barbaric practice of female genital mutilation (FGM), which has been suffered by 140 million women worldwide. An estimated two million girls are at risk each year. "I have been fighting against this since medical college, but the political system, especially under [Anwar] Sadat and [Hosni] Mubarak, encouraged religious fundamentalists," she says. She has written 47 books tackling problems faced by women in Egypt, including Women and Sex in 1972, for which she lost her job as director of public health for the Egyptian Ministry of Health. The practice, started in the 2nd century BC, continues worldwide. The Books of Nawal El Saadawi. In a Talk of the Town piece in this week’s issue, I report on Nawal El Saadawi—feminist, writer, dissident, octogenarian—and her efforts to unite Egyptian women of all ages in a post-Mubarak Egypt.

On her bookshelves, I note, are Japanese translations of her own work, which has also been translated into English (and twelve other languages), including her first book of non-fiction, “Women and Sex.” “Women and Sex” was banned in Egypt for nearly two decades after it was first published, and when it did finally appear here, in 1972, it resulted in El Saadawi, who has a degree in medicine, losing her job as Director of Public Health at the Ministry of Health.

The book includes a frank discussion of female genital mutilation. F.G.M. —otherwise known as female circumcision or female genital cutting (or, in certain contexts, simply “cutting”)—is the custom by which a girl’s external genitalia (almost always the clitoris) is removed in order to preserve her “modesty.” Nawal El Saadawi: 'Religion is all politics' Nawal El Saadawi – a creative and dissident life. Nawal El Saadawi – a creative and dissident life. Brian Belton and Clare Dowding explore Nawal El Saadawi’s argument that dissidence is a path to creativity – through which inequalities can be challenged and social and political change can occur. contents: life · self-government · colonialism and slavery · religion · words · life · conclusion · bibliography · web sites · authors The title of this piece, Dissidence and Creativity, relates to El Saadawi’s argument that dissidence is a clear path to creativity. Indeed, for her, conformity too often involves the stifling of the creative powers that she contests are part of our make-up as human beings.

Can I have the passion and knowledge required to change the powerful oppressive system of family and government without being creative? Life Refusing to accept the limitations imposed by both religious and colonial oppression on most women of rural origin, she qualified as a doctor in 1955 and rose to become Egypt’s Director of Public Health. Nawal El Saadawi | Women's Learning Partnership. Nawal El Saadawi is an Egyptian novelist, essayist and physician. Her works of fiction, addressing such themes as the oppression of women and women’s desire for self-expression, have widened the boundaries of the Arab novel and influenced successive generations of young women over the last three decades. Her books have been banned in Egypt and some other Arab countries. Dr. El Saadawi worked as a physician at the University of Cairo in the mid-1950s, as well as at the Rural Health Center in Tahla.

From 1973 to 1978, Dr. Dr. Dr. Nawal El Saadawi is a leading Egyptian feminist, sociologist, medical doctor and militant writer on Arab women's problems. Siballweg@airfrance.fr Rorubin@ibm.net The Vile News Network (WGOD-VNN) Sponsored by the Group of Decedents A little about our guest: Nawal El Saadawi was born in 1931 in Kafr Tahla, a small village outside of Cairo. El Saadawi was raised in a large household with eight brothers and sisters.. Welcome Ms. Question 1: Your family was relatively traditional, you were "circumcised" at the age of six, and somewhat progressive, your father insisted that all of his children be educated. ** Sylvia discuss the ideas present in that printout on circumcisions. Question 2: Despite the limitations imposed on you by both religious and colonial oppression on rural women, You were able to attend the University of Cairo and graduated in 1955 with a degree in psychiatry.

Question 4: You began writing 25 years ago, have written 27 books all concentrating on woman, particularly Arab woman, their sexuality and legal status. When you came out of prison there were two routes you felt you could take. 1.) 2.) A.)