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13 Mental Health Benefits Of Exercise | Huffington Post. Many people hit the gym or pound the pavement to improve cardiovascular health, build muscle, and of course, get a rockin’ bod, but working out has above-the-neck benefits, too. For the past decade or so, scientists have pondered how exercising can boost brain function. Regardless of age or fitness level (yup, this includes everyone from mall-walkers to marathoners), studies show that making time for exercise provides some serious mental benefits. Get inspired to exercise by reading up on these unexpected ways that working out can benefit mental health, relationships and lead to a healthier and happier life overall. 1. Reduce Stress Rough day at the office? Take a walk or head to the gym for a quick workout.

One of the most common mental benefits of exercise is stress relief. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Working out can have positive effects far beyond the gym (and beach season). What inspires you to stay fit? Also on HuffPost: Unexpected Side Benefits Of Exercise Alamy. Exercise and Depression: Endorphins, Reducing Stress, and More. Want to learn more about exercise and depression? Many studies show that people who exercise regularly benefit with a positive boost in mood and lower rates of depression. What Are the Psychological Benefits of Exercise With Depression? Improved self-esteem is a key psychological benefit of regular physical activity.

When you exercise, your body releases chemicals called endorphins. These endorphins interact with the receptors in your brain that reduce your perception of pain. Endorphins also trigger a positive feeling in the body, similar to that of morphine. Endorphins act as analgesics, which means they diminish the perception of pain. Regular exercise has been proven to: Reduce stress Ward off anxiety and feelings of depression Boost self-esteem Improve sleep Exercise also has these added health benefits: It strengthens your heart. Is Exercise a Treatment for Clinical Depression?

Are there Types of Exercises That Are Better for Depression? Continued What physical activities do I enjoy? Physical activity improves quality of life. Do you want to add years to your life? Or life to your years? Feeling your best boosts your zeal for life! The American Heart Association recommends at least 150-minutes of moderate activity each week. An easy way to remember this is 30 minutes at least 5 days a week, but three 10-minute periods of activity are as beneficial to your overall fitness as one 30-minute session.

This is achievable! Physical activity may also help encourage you to spend some time outdoors. Here are some reasons why physical activity is proven to improve both mental and physical health. Physical activity boosts mental wellness. Regular physical activity can relieve tension, anxiety, depression and anger. Physical activity improves physical wellness. Reduced Risk Factors Too much sitting and other sedentary activities can increase your risk of cardiovascular disease. Becoming more active can help lower your blood pressure and also boost your levels of good cholesterol. Physical activity prolongs your optimal health. Health Benefits of Exercise. People of all ages can improve the quality of their lives and reduce the risks of developing coronary heart disease, hypertension, some cancers and type 2 diabetes with ongoing participation in moderate physical activity and exercise.

Daily exercise will also enhance one’s mental well-being and promote healthy musculoskeletal function throughout life. Although habitual physical activity is an attainable goal on the path to a healthier life, more than half of U.S. adults do not get ≥ 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per day at least 5 days per week (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] 2007a). A formidable challenge facing many personal fitness trainers (PFTs) and other health and fitness professionals is finding new ways of motivating people to improve their well-being through consistent participation in physical activity and exercise. 1. Cardiovascular Disease 2–4. Hypertension is a major health problem. 6–8. 9. 10–13. 14. 15–16. 17–18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

AnnalesD1161Kettunen. Unexpected Benefits of Exercise. Many people hit the gym or pound the pavement to improve cardiovascular health, build muscle, and of course, get a rockin’ bod, but working out has above-the-neck benefits, too. For the past decade or so, scientists have pondered how exercising can boost brain function. Regardless of age or fitness level (yup, this includes everyone from mall-walkers to marathoners), studies show that making time for exercise provides some serious mental benefits. Get inspired to exercise by reading up on these unexpected ways that working out can benefit mental health, relationships, and lead to a healthier and happier life overall. 1. Reduce stress.

Rough day at the office? Take a walk or head to the gym for a quick workout. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Read the rest over on Greatist! Exercise for Stress and Anxiety | Anxiety and Depression Association of America, ADAA. The physical benefits of exercise — improving physical condition and fighting disease — have long been established, and physicians always encourage staying physically active. Exercise is also con sidered vital for maintaining mental fitness, and it can reduce stress. Studies show that it is very effective at reducing fatigue, improving alertness and concentration, and at enhancing overall cognitive function. This can be especially helpful when stress has depleted your energy or ability to concentrate. When stress affects the brain, with its many nerve connections, the rest of the body feels the impact as well.

Scientists have found that regular participation in aerobic exercise has been shown to decrease overall levels of tension, elevate and stabilize mood, improve sleep, and improve self-esteem. Relationship of Exercise to Anxiety Disorders Psychologists studying how exercise relieves anxiety and depression suggest that a 10-minute walk may be just as good as a 45-minute workout.

Exercise and stress: Get moving to manage stress. Exercise and stress: Get moving to manage stress Exercise in almost any form can act as a stress reliever. Being active can boost your feel-good endorphins and distract you from daily worries. By Mayo Clinic Staff You know that exercise does your body good, but you're too busy and stressed to fit it into your routine. Hold on a second — there's good news when it comes to exercise and stress. Virtually any form of exercise, from aerobics to yoga, can act as a stress reliever. Exercise and stress relief Exercise increases your overall health and your sense of well-being, which puts more pep in your step every day. It pumps up your endorphins. References Seaward BL. See more In-depth.