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10 Rare HTML Tags You Really Should Know - Nettuts+ Web developers these days are often expected to know and work in multiple languages.

10 Rare HTML Tags You Really Should Know - Nettuts+

As a result, it's tricky to learn everything a language has to offer and easy to find yourself not utilizing the full potential of some more specialized but very useful tags. Unfortunately we haven't been tapping into the full potential of these more obscure HTML tags as of late. But it's never too late to get back into the game and start writing code that taps into the power of some under-used tags. Here are ten of some of the most underused and misunderstood tags in HTML. While they might be less familiar, they're still quite useful in certain situations. 1. All of us will be familiar with the <blockquote> tag, but did you know about <blockquote>'s little brother <cite>? The <cite> tag is really useful for citing bibliographic and other site references. David Allen's breakthrough organization book Getting Things Done has taken the web by storm. 2. Live demo: 3. SEO is full of trickery and magic. CleanCode.jpg (JPEG Image, 1652x1275 pixels)

456 Berea Street: Articles and news on web standards, accessibil. Top 12 Ruby on Rails Tutorials. A former student asked me a few days ago how I learned Ruby on Rails.

Top 12 Ruby on Rails Tutorials

The answer was that I simply read alot of great tutorials. So in the spirit of sharing, here are the 12 tutorials that I found most useful: Rolling with Ruby on Rails – Curtis Hibbs of offers his first excellent introduction to Ruby on Rails. This is the article that got me really excited about RoR.2. Rolling with Ruby on Rails, Part 2 – The sequel to Curtis Hibbs excellent series of articles.3. Hey, Ruby on Rails Fans! UPDATE, JUNE 2009: Want more up-to-date tutorials on Ruby programming? Happy Rails developing and if you have any other tutorials that you’d like to share, please leave them in the comments!

Tagged as: ruby on rails, tutorial. For those who don’t know me, I’m a researcher for BBC Research & Development.

For the last fifteen months I’ve been on attachment with BBC Scotland learning about how R&D interfaces with production divisions. Prior to my attachment I worked closely with Ian on Backstage events such as the Edinburgh Un-Festival and Over the Air so now I’m back in the fold I’ve been asked to work with a small team on the closedown and migration of BBC Backstage. A few weeks have passed since the announcement that Backstage is due to close. It’s taken a while to get up to speed but recently we’ve really started to get a clear idea on what we need to do to close down Backstage in a way that preserves its legacy and continues to support its community.

Here’s a brief rundown of what we’ve been up to. At the moment we’re working our way through the current website to working out which projects are still live. To help commemorate Backstage we’ll be producing a retrospective ebook at the end of the year. Welcome.