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Loving v. Virginia. MR.

Loving v. Virginia

CHIEF JUSTICE WARREN delivered the opinion of the Court. This case presents a constitutional question never addressed by this Court: whether a statutory scheme adopted by the State of Virginia to prevent marriages between persons solely on the basis of racial classifications violates the Equal Protection and Due Process Clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment. For reasons which seem to us to reflect the central meaning of those constitutional commands, we conclude that these statutes cannot stand consistently with the Fourteenth Amendment. In June 1958, two residents of Virginia, Mildred Jeter, a Negro woman, and Richard Loving, a white man, were married in the District of Columbia pursuant to its laws. Shortly after their marriage, the Lovings returned to Virginia and established their marital abode in Caroline County. "Almighty God created the races white, black, yellow, malay and red, and he placed them on separate continents.

These convictions must be reversed. Loving v. Virginia (1967) - Bill of Rights Institute. Loving v Virginia: What You Didn't Know About Its History. When the Supreme Court heard arguments in the case Loving v. the Commonwealth of Virginia, defendants Richard and Mildred Loving chose not to appear in person.

Loving v Virginia: What You Didn't Know About Its History

In 1958, they had been convicted for the felony of miscegenation. As lawyers presented their arguments, 17 states remained steadfast in their refusal to repeal such laws banning interracial marriages. But, though he did not attend the arguments, Richard sent a message to the justices: “Tell the Court I love my wife and it is just not fair that I cannot live with her in Virginia.” The justices unanimously agreed. On June 12, 1967, proscriptions against interracial marriage were declared unconstitutional.

In the years since, the couple’s victory has often been seen as a touchstone in the fight for black civil rights. But the Lovings’ public persona was more myth than reality. At approximately 2 a.m. on July 11, 1958, Sheriff R. Get your history fix in one place: sign up for the weekly TIME History newsletter. Justia U.S. Supreme Court Center. Loving v. Virginia. LOVING v. VIRGINIA. LOVING v.

LOVING v. VIRGINIA

VIRGINIA, (1967) No. 395 Argued: April 10, 1967 Decided: June 12, 1967 Virginia's statutory scheme to prevent marriages between persons solely on the basis of racial classifications held to violate the Equal Protection and Due Process Clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment. Pp. 4-12. 206 Va. 924, 147 S. Bernard S. R. William M. Briefs of amici curiae, urging reversal, were filed by William M. T. MR. This case presents a constitutional question never addressed by this Court: whether a statutory scheme adopted by the State of Virginia to prevent marriages between persons solely on the basis of racial classifications violates the Equal Protection and Due Process Clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment. 1 For reasons which seem to us to reflect the central meaning of those constitutional commands, we conclude that these statutes cannot stand consistently with the Fourteenth Amendment.

"Leaving State to evade law. These convictions must be reversed. It is so ordered. Footnotes.