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Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education. Adopted by the NCTE Executive Committee, November 2008 By: National Association for Media Literacy Education (NAMLE), Student Television Network (STN), Media Commission of the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), Action Coalition for Media Education (ACME), and Visual Communication Division of the International Communication Association (ICA) WHAT THIS ISThis document is a code of best practices that helps educators using media literacy concepts and techniques to interpret the copyright doctrine of fair use.

Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education

Fair use is the right to use copyrighted material without permission or payment under some circumstances -- especially when the cultural or social benefits of the use are predominant. It is a general right that applies even in situations where the law provides no specific authorization for the use in question -- as it does for certain narrowly defined classroom activities. Social Networking Policies: Best Practices For Companies. Policy Priorities:Can Social Media and School Policies be "Friends"?:Can Social Media and School Policies be "Friends"?

Winter 2011 | Volume 17 | Number 4 Can Social Media and School Policies be "Friends"?

Policy Priorities:Can Social Media and School Policies be "Friends"?:Can Social Media and School Policies be "Friends"?

Between 2004 and 2009, the amount of time that kids ages 2 to 11 spent online increased by 63 percent, according to a Nielsen study. Driving these trends is increasing mobile access, which research from International Data Corp. predicts will eclipse wired access to the Internet by 2015. The 11 Rules of Social Media Etiquette. Since social media is, well, a social medium, it’s important that users understand the proper ways to behave online.

The 11 Rules of Social Media Etiquette

No, just because you’re behind a computer monitor in your mom’s basement doesn’t mean all social etiquette goes out the window. It’s quite the opposite—following proper social media etiquette is a key to being successful online (and to making sure you don’t make a complete idiot out of yourself.) 1. Give More than You Receive- If you want to receive attention from others online, you have to be willing to give it first. It’s the old “I’ll scratch your back if you scratch mine” routine. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. Why Social Media Curriculum is Critical in Schools - 140 Charact. I am presenting at The 140 Characters Conference in New York City on April 20th.

Why Social Media Curriculum is Critical in Schools - 140 Charact

This event is the largest worldwide gathering of people interested in the effects of the real-time Internet on business, education, and “we” the people. Some of the other speakers include Ann Curry, NBC News (@AnnCurry), Chris Lehmann, Principal of the Science Leadership Academy, (@chrislehmann), Donny Deustch (@Donny_Deutsch), Ivanka Trump (@IvankaTrump), and MC Hammer (@MCHammer). I will be a part of the Twitter and Education panel and joined by @mbteach, @kjarret, @shellterrell with @parentella moderating.

Teaching Kids to Manage their Digital Footprint - 140 Character. I am presenting at The 140 Characters Conference in New York City which is taking place April 20-21, 2010 at the 92nd Street Y in Manhattan.

Teaching Kids to Manage their Digital Footprint - 140 Character

This event is the largest worldwide gathering of people interested in the effects of the real-time Internet on business, education, and “we” the people. Some of the other speakers include Ann Curry, NBC News (@AnnCurry), Chris Lehmann, Principal of the Science Leadership Academy, (@chrislehmann), Donny Deustch (@Donny_Deutsch), Ivanka Trump (@IvankaTrump), and MC Hammer (@MCHammer).

I will be a part of the Twitter and Education panel. Digiteen - Digital Etiquette. 1 .

digiteen - Digital Etiquette

Overview Digital etiquette, or netiquette as its sometimes called, is a basic set of rules you should follow in order to make the internet better for others, and better for you. It’s just as important to treat people with courtesy and respect online as it is in real life. When you instant message, chat, or email someone over the Internet, they can’t see your face to tell if you’re teasing them or saying something in jest.

How do you practice good Netiquette? 2. The internet can be a powerful tool when it comes to circulating opinion or information. 3. Techdirt did a study that showed that many people purposely responded to emails late at work, because replying to quickly implies that they do not have enough work to do. IM and SMS messages are most subject to misinterpretation, but other communications are less obscure. How Social Media Has Changed Us. Mike Laurie works at London agency Made by Many where he helps design social digital stuff.

How Social Media Has Changed Us

You follow him on Twitter @mikelaurie. Over the last 10 years, we've seen social media galvanize thousands over politics, create as many industries as it has destroyed, and offer an abundance of visual and audio entertainment. But has all this incredible change actually changed us, or just the world we live in? Below are some areas in which social media has had lasting, and arguably permanent effects on the ways in which we live. The question is, are these changes all for the better? Child Literacy. 14 Ways K–12 Librarians Can Teach Social Media by Joyce Valenza. 9/27/2009 By: This is the best time in history to be a teacher-librarian.

14 Ways K–12 Librarians Can Teach Social Media by Joyce Valenza

Major shifts in our information and communication landscapes present new opportunities for librarians to teach and lead in areas that were always considered part of their role, helping learners of all ages effectively use, manage, evaluate, organize and communicate information, and to love reading in its glorious new variety. A school’s teacher-librarian is its chief information officer, but in a networked world, the position is more that of moderator or coach, the person who ensures that students and teachers can effectively interact with information and leverage it to create and share and make a difference in the community and beyond.

For background, take a look at the Standards for the 21st Century Learner. These information-fluency standards scream inquiry, critical thinking, digital citizenship, creative communication, collaboration, and networking.