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Program-Transformation.Org The Program Transformation Wiki Program transformation techniques are used in a many areas of software engineering ranging from program synthesis, via program optimization and program refactoring, to reverse engineering and documentation generation. Many theories, tools and applications have been developed over the last 30 years. Often the results of these efforts are used only in the community that developed them. Program-Transformation.Org
www.agner.org/optimize/objconv-instructions.pdf
the H - Oline, Internet Security

simple, but effective system independent anti-debug trick based on well-documented APIs and does not involve assembly inline (means: it could be implemented in pure C). also it works as anti-dump sensor. caution: I would recommend do _not_ use this thick in production code, because it’s based on the bug (two bugs actually: one in Windows, another in OllyDbg), which could be fixed at any moment. however, noting terrible happens if the bug would be fixed - the application just could not detect debugger/dumper. in passing: I found this bug working on the project for a spectrography cherry group, well, not a cherry actually, but I prefer to keep the real name if it under the mat, anyway it’s all about Ciscar Fon - my first love, a gothic type, very kinky and yet creative. KPNC KPNC
Hex Blog

EM_386 Here is an interesting WebKit vulnerability I came across and reported to Google, Apple and the WebKit.org developers. Description: WebKit CSS Parser Type ConfusionSoftware Affected: Chrome 7/8, Safari 5.0.3, Epiphany 2.30.2, WebKit-r72146 (others untested)Severity: Medium The severity of the vulnerability was marked Medium by the Chrome developers because the bug can only result in an information leak. I don't have a problem with that but I have some more thoughts on it at the end of the post. EM_386
Hardware Download Hardware Download August 26 2011 License: Non-Profit Open WxPic allows, with a PC and an adapter (programmer), to program a PIC micro-controller, by loading a HEX file, reviewing and/or editing the configuration or memory and writing and/or verifyin... eVAX is a software emulation of a VAX computer, written entirely in portable C. The emulator includes a "high function" console that supports assembly, disassembly, and debugging of ... VLSI Vision CPiA kernel driver & mediakit addon (for BeOS 4.5).
How main() is executed on Linux LG #84 How main() is executed on Linux LG #84 Starting The question is simple: how does linux execute my main()? Through this document, I'll use the following simple C program to illustrate how it works. It's called "simple.c" main(){ return(0);} Build
PLT and GOT - the key to code sharing and dynamic libraries : technovelty (this post was going to be about something else, but after getting this far, I think it stands on its own as an introduction to dynamic linking) The shared library is an integral part of a modern system, but often the mechanisms behind the implementation are less well understood. There are, of course, many guides to this sort of thing. PLT and GOT - the key to code sharing and dynamic libraries : technovelty
Dynamic Linking in Linux and Windows, part one Dynamic Linking in Linux and Windows, part one by Reji Thomas and Bhasker Reddy This article discusses the shared libraries concept in both Windows and Linux, and offers a walk-through through various data structures to explain how dynamic linking is done in these operating systems. The paper will be useful for developers interested in the security implications and the relative speed of dynamic linking, and assumes some prior cursory knowledge with dynamic linking. Part one introduces the concepts for both Linux and Windows, but will focus primarily on Linux. Next time in part two, we'll discuss how it works in Windows and then continue to compare the two environments. Static Libraries vs.
Dynamic Linking in Linux and Windows, part two by Reji Thomas and Bhasker Reddy This article discusses the shared libraries concept in both Windows and Linux, and offers a walk through various data structures to explain how dynamic linking is done in these operating systems. The paper will be useful for developers interested in the security implications and the relative speed of dynamic linking, and assumes some prior cursory knowledge with dynamic linking. Part one introduced the concepts for both Linux and Windows and focused primarily on Linux. Now in part two, we'll discuss how it works in Windows and then continue compare the two environments. Readers are encouraged to review part one again before continuing with this article. Dynamic Linking in Linux and Windows, part two
ARTeam ezine 4th
How to Disassemble DLL on Linux