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Sounding the Revolution. Viva La Revolución!

Sounding the Revolution

(Image via iStockphoto) Same same, but different. This is my favorite Thai expression. It can mean any number of things depending on the context. Often it is used in sales situations at the night markets: “Are these real Nike shoes?” “Yes. This expression came to mind after reading a recent article in the Guardian by John Naughton. Did Weak Copyright Laws Help Germany Outpace The British Empire? There’s a new thesis making the rounds that has already stimulated plenty of discussion about the benefits and costs of copyright laws.

Did Weak Copyright Laws Help Germany Outpace The British Empire?

It comes from the German economic historian Eckhard Höffner, his work summarized in a Der Spiegel review titled “No Copyright Law: The Real Reason for Germany’s Industrial Expansion.” Höffner contends (according to the review) that the near absence of copyright law in eighteenth and nineteenth century Germany laid the groundwork for the “Gründerzeit”—the enormous wave of economic growth that Deutschland experienced in the middle and later nineteenth century. An “incomparable mass of reading material was being produced in Germany” by the 1830s, Höffner notes.

Some 14,000 publications appeared in the region in 1836, widely distributed thanks to the presence of “plagiarizers”—competing publishing houses unafraid of infringement suits. The result was a cheap mass book market catering to a huge reading public. Going medieval. Publish or post? A new European-funded initiative is advocating an entirely new system of science publishing, in which scientists avoid the hassles of traditional peer review by taking a quietly radical step: post their results on their websites.

Publish or post?

Image: Wikimedia commons, GfloresAs the linkurl:news release; for LiquidPublication simply states: "Don't print it; post it. " To disseminate the information, the progra A new European-funded initiative is advocating an entirely new system of science publishing, in which scientists avoid the hassles of traditional peer review by taking a quietly radical step: post their results on their websites. As the linkurl:news release; for LiquidPublication simply states: "Don't print it; post it. " To disseminate the information, the program has a software platform that lets other scientists search for what's been posted, leave comments, link related works, and gather papers and information into their own personalized online journals -- all for free.

The Hugh Cudlipp lecture: Does journalism exist? Thank you for inviting me to give this lecture in honour of the memory of Hugh Cudlipp.

The Hugh Cudlipp lecture: Does journalism exist?

Ask any British journalist who were their editor-heroes over the last 30 or 40 years and two names keep recurring. One is Harry Evans. The other is Hugh Cudlipp. Why were they so admired? Because they seemed to represent the best of journalistic virtues – courage, campaigning, toughness, compassion, humour, irreverence; a serious engagement with serious things; a sense of fairness; an eye for injustice; a passion for explaining; knowing how to achieve impact; a connection with readers.

It is wonderful that Jodi Cudlipp is here tonight, though I hope she will not misunderstand me when I say a tiny part of me is quite glad Lord Cudlipp is not here in person. He once wrote: He quoted Kingsley Martin, former editor of the New Statesman: "The Mirror says openly only what the readers of the News Chronicle and the Guardian say behind their hands.

" Of course, you know why people ask. So it's a vital question. Interview With Jean-Claude Bradley - The Impact of Open Notebook Science. FEATURE Interview With Jean-Claude Bradley The Impact of Open Notebook Science by Richard Poynder Jean-Claude Bradley is an organic chemist at Drexel University in Philadelphia.

Interview With Jean-Claude Bradley - The Impact of Open Notebook Science

As with most scientists, Bradley used to be very secretive. He kept his research under wraps until publication and frequently applied for patents on his work in nanotechnology and gene therapy. However, he asked himself a difficult question 5 years ago: Was his research having the kind of impact he would like? He had to conclude that the answer was “no,” and this was partly a consequence of the culture of secrecy that permeates research today. Q: Can you tell us about your job and research interests? A: I am an associate professor of chemistry and an organic chemist at Drexel University in Philadelphia. Additionally, in the process of doing this we discovered that sometimes these compounds will precipitate out in pure form. And for the past 5 years, I have been practicing open science. A: Exactly.

A: Right. Liquid Publications: Scientific Publications meet the Web — LiquidPub Project. Eptcs slides-for-coasp-2010.