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Storing Body Cam Data is the Next Big Challenge for Police. There are nearly 18,000 state and local police departments in the United States, and almost one-third of them are now putting body-cameras on their officers.

Storing Body Cam Data is the Next Big Challenge for Police

And that number is almost certain to grow as the technology is embraced by cops and their critics alike. But the explosion in body cameras has created its own problem: what to do with all that data, and how to pay for storing it. Police Body Cams Spark Concerns About Privacy, Mass Surveillance. Body Cameras on School Police Spark Student Privacy Concerns. Joseph Fox, a school resource officer in the Shelby County Sheriff's Department, wears a personal body camera while on duty at Southwind High School in Memphis, Tenn.

Body Cameras on School Police Spark Student Privacy Concerns

A growing number of school-based police are being equipped with the recording devices. —Stan Carroll/The Commercial Appeal/Zuma As law-enforcement agencies around the country begin using body cameras to monitor police interactions with the public, the chest-mounted recording devices are increasingly making their way into public schools. The devices, about the size of a pager, have been a centerpiece of police-reform proposals since a Ferguson, Mo., police officer shot and killed unarmed teenager Michael Brown last summer, an event marked by conflicting accounts from bystanders. The use of body cameras in schools has been welcomed by some, but it has also sparked privacy concerns from some districts and civil rights groups.

Big Brother in Big Apple? NYC gunshot tracking system sparks privacy concerns — RT America. It’s been almost a week since New York Police Department deployed a new ShotSpotter gunshot detection system.

Big Brother in Big Apple? NYC gunshot tracking system sparks privacy concerns — RT America

However, the innovation has raised privacy concerns among New Yorkers while tracking loud bangs, the system records private conversations. Questions arose after New York Police Department deployed 300 hidden microphone sensors around the city. They are aimed at identifying the sound of gun shots, and then activate nearby cameras and immediately alert law enforcement officials. The two-year pilot program will cost New York a total of $1.5million annually. Both the mayor Bill de Blasio and police commissioner William Bratton say that ShotSpotter should help officers to respond more quickly to shootings. If Cops Don’t Turn on Their Body Cameras, Courts Should Instruct Juries to Think Twice about Their Testimony. Video of Savannah Police Arresting Wrong Man goes Viral. A controversial video of Savannah-Metro police arresting the wrong man has now had more than 2,000,000 views on Facebook.

Video of Savannah Police Arresting Wrong Man goes Viral

That’s according to Savannah attorney William Claiborne who put the video up on Youtube and social media. Clairborne says the condensed version shows three Metro officers tasing and then taking into custody a young African American man and indicating they have a warrant for his arrest. Later, they realize they have put handcuffs on the wrong person. The so called “condensed” version of footage from three body cameras was quickly condemned by Savannah Metro Police Chief Joseph Lumpkin saying the short version was intended to be “misleading and inflammatory.”

In an effort to be transparent, Lumpkin said the department was releasing all of the body camera video of the incident. Shaun King - Journal. Austin Police Chief 'Sickened' by Violent Arrest of Breaion King. A police chief apologized Thursday to a driver after video emerged showing her being slammed to the ground by an officer during her arrest following a minor traffic stop last year.

Austin Police Chief 'Sickened' by Violent Arrest of Breaion King

Austin, Texas Police Chief Art Acevedo apologized to Breaion King during a news conference and pledged a series of administrative investigations and increased training. He said his "heart was sickened and saddened" by the arrest. "I'm sorry that on the day that you were stopped for going 15 miles per hour," Acevedo said in a public apology.