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Indoor air. It is generally recognised that Australians spend 90% or more of their time indoors.

Indoor air

Despite this, relatively little research has been done on the quality of air in our homes, schools, recreational buildings,restaurants, public buildings, offices, or inside cars. Poor indoor air quality can result in significant adverse impacts on our health and environment. Moreover, these impacts carry a significant cost burden to the economy.

The CSIRO estimates that the cost of poor indoor air quality in Australia may be as high as $12 billion per year (Brown, 1998). In recent years, comparative risk studies performed by the US EPA and its Science Advisory Board have consistently ranked indoor air pollution among the top five environmental risks to public health (US EPA, 1993). Lifetime risk of mesothelioma from Fluffy asbestos homes 16 in 100,000. While the risk of mesothelioma from living in an asbestos-contaminated house is small, an expert says anything greater than 1 in 100,000 is unacceptable.

Lifetime risk of mesothelioma from Fluffy asbestos homes 16 in 100,000

Photo: Jay Cronan.

Glaxo plant with Legionnaires' bacteria is quiet for 2nd day. ZEBULON, N.C.

Glaxo plant with Legionnaires' bacteria is quiet for 2nd day

(AP) -- All was quiet Wednesday at a GlaxoSmithKline pharmaceutical plant that was shut down after the drug maker discovered the bacteria that cause potentially fatal Legionnaires' disease in a cooling tower at the site. Only a handful of cars could be seen in the parking lots outside the manufacturing plant about 25 miles east of Raleigh where asthma medications and other inhalable products are produced. People can contract Legionnaires' disease when they inhale water vapor or mist containing the bacteria, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. It does not spread from person to person, the agency said. The cooling tower "does not come into contact with product manufactured at the facility," GlaxoSmithKline said late Tuesday. Glaxo spokeswomen have not responded to questions about whether there was any risk of indoor exposure to employees or medicines from water droplets that could carry the legionella bacteria.

A U.S. Tox Town - Phthalates - Toxic chemicals and environmental health risks where you live and work - Text Version. Phthalates are a family of chemicals used in plastics and many other products.

This is the chemical the air fresheners webpage is talking about. I think this could possibly be the other chemical we focus on? LH – hsh112indoorairpollution

What are phthalates?

Tox Town - Phthalates - Toxic chemicals and environmental health risks where you live and work - Text Version

Phthalates are a group of chemicals used to soften and increase the flexibility of plastic and vinyl. Polyvinyl chloride is made softer and more flexible by the addition of phthalates. Phthalates are used in hundreds of consumer products. Phthalates are used in cosmetics and personal care products, including perfume, hair spray, soap, shampoo, nail polish, and skin moisturizers. New Study: Common Air Fresheners Contain Chemicals That May Affect Human Reproductive Development. New Study: Common Air Fresheners Contain Chemicals That May Affect Human Reproductive Development Environmental Group Calls for Additional Testing, Consumer Awareness to Prevent Risky Exposure NEW YORK (September 19, 2007) – An analysis of more than a dozen common household air fresheners found that most contain chemicals that may affect hormones and reproductive development, particularly in babies, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) said today.

New Study: Common Air Fresheners Contain Chemicals That May Affect Human Reproductive Development

The federal government does not currently test air fresheners for safety or require manufacturers to meet any specific safety standards. The study offers both consumers and officials new information on the risks certain air fresheners pose. Ozone-initiated VOC and particle emissions from a cleaning agent and an air freshener: Risk assessment of acute airway effects. Open Access Highlights.

Ozone-initiated VOC and particle emissions from a cleaning agent and an air freshener: Risk assessment of acute airway effects

Biological air contamination in elderly care centers: geria project. Carpet and Indoor air quality. US Environmental Protection Agency. According to a recent survey, 75 percent of U.S. households used at least one pesticide product indoors during the past year.

US Environmental Protection Agency

Is CO2 a good proxy for indoor air quality in classrooms? Part 1: The interrelationships between thermal conditions, CO2 levels, ventilation rates and selected indoor pollutants. US Environmental Protection Agency. The Inside Story: A Guide to Indoor Air Quality.

Savannah- Suggested from AUS gov website. – hsh112indoorairpollution
US Environmental Protection Agency

Indoor Air Pollution: Introduction for Health Professionals. This document may be reproduced without change, in whole or in part, without permission, except for use as advertising material or product endorsement.

Indoor Air Pollution: Introduction for Health Professionals

Any such reproduction should credit the American Lung Association, the American Medical Association, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The user of all or any part of this document in a deceptive or inaccurate manner or for purposes of endorsing a particular product may be subject to appropriate legal action. Information provided in this document is based upon current scientific and technical understanding of the issues presented and agency approval is limited to the jurisdictional boundaries established by the statutes governing the co-authoring agencies. Introduction Indoor air pollution poses many challenges to the health professional. The lung is the most common site of injury by airborne pollutants. How To Use This Booklet. Tox Town - Indoor Air - Text Version. Why is indoor air a concern?

Tox Town - Indoor Air - Text Version

Most people in the United States spend approximately 90 percent of their time indoors. However, the indoor air we breathe in homes and other buildings can be more polluted than outdoor air and can increase the risk of illness. There are many sources of indoor air pollution in homes. They include biological contaminants such as bacteria, molds and pollen, burning of fuels and tobacco, building materials and furnishings, household products, central heating and cooling systems, and outdoor sources.