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Speech and Language Goals and Planning an IEP for Children with Apraxia - Apraxia-KIDS. Speech and Language Goals and Planning an IEP for Children with Apraxia Part 2by Lori Hickman, M.S., CCC-SLP The goal of intervention for a child with apraxia is to enable the child to gain volitional control of his/her articulators in order to produce age-appropriate, co-articulated, intelligible speech (co-articulation refers to the way we talk when we connect our words together in a speech-melody, rather than pronouncing each word individually).

Speech and Language Goals and Planning an IEP for Children with Apraxia - Apraxia-KIDS

To that end, I believe one must consider the following in the development of speech and language goals for a child with apraxia: How intelligible are the childs utterances? How does this level of intelligibility compare to that of his/her peers? If the child is older, it is even more important to determine if his/her utterance length and complexity and communicative intent (ability to communicate a wide range of things to others) are commensurate with his/her peers. How does the child compare to his/her peers in terms of social skills? Apraxia Therapy. If he isn't talking yet, you can begin with apraxia strategies like oral motor sequences with a favorite adult in the mirror, sensory stimulation to the oral area with tooth brushing, eating etc. and help him develop some awareness of what mouths do.

Apraxia Therapy

Add voice when you can for fun and with non-word utterances at first (especially if there is a real psychological factor here). Enjoy sound sequences that can be shaped into words when he is ready. Some of these little ones also respond well to supplimenting utterances with simple words in sign as they speak. It seems to help them sequence where words go and takes the "talk right" pressure off, because they can vocalize with the sign and be understood.

As the speech develops, the sign naturally drops. Speech and Language Goals When Planning an IEP for a Child With Apraxia of Speech - Apraxia-KIDS. Speech and Language Goals When Planning an IEP for a Child With Apraxia of Speech Part 1by Lori Hickman, M.S., CCC-SLP The easy answer to the question, "What type of speech and language goals should be considered when planning an IEP for a child with apraxia?

Speech and Language Goals When Planning an IEP for a Child With Apraxia of Speech - Apraxia-KIDS

" is that any area of communication deficit that the child with CAS exhibits should be addressed in his/her treatment program. What complicates the answer is that many areas of communication can be affected when a child has CAS, so a clinician must be very observant in order to ascertain which areas of communication are affected for each child. The components of any speech-language treatment program will vary depending on the individual child. When a clinician is developing goals for an Individualized Education Plan (IEP), they will look at goals in two ways long-term goals and short-term objectives. Finally, parents are an important part of the goal development. References: Hickman, L. Part 3 - Methods and Content. Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) is neurological speech disorder that causes children to have difficulty with the motor planning, sequencing, and programming necessary to produce volitional speech.

Part 3 - Methods and Content

Therapy needs to address the core problem of motor planning for speech in the most effective way possible. Every child is different, so therapy must be customized. Therapy for a young child who is nonverbal will be different from therapy for an older child who is using multi-word sentences, but the speech is hard to understand. However, the basic underlying fundamentals of therapy for apraxia are going to be similar. These underlying fundamentals are based on current research and professional consensus. Verbal Apraxia. Developmental Verbal Dyspraxia or Apraxia of Speech. Dysarthria vs. Apraxia: A Comparison. Kumin.Apraxia.pdf (application/pdf Object)

The Dyspraxia Support Group of New Zealand - What is dyspraxia? Developmental Dyspraxia has been recognised by doctors and therapists since very early last century, when Collier first described it as 'congenital maladroitness'.

The Dyspraxia Support Group of New Zealand - What is dyspraxia?

In 1937 Dr Samuel Orton declared it to be 'one of the six most common developmental disorders, showing distinctive impairment of praxis'. Since then it has been described and labelled by many, such as A. Jean Ayres, who in 1972 called it a disorder of Sensory Integration, or Dr Sasson Gubbay who in 1975 called it the 'Clumsy Child Syndrome'. Other labels have included developmental awkwardness, sensorimotor dysfunction, minimal brain dysfunction, motor sequencing disorder, and most recently Developmental Coordination Disorder.

The World Health Organisation currently lists it as Specific Developmental Disorder of Motor Function. Here in New Zealand it is felt that the term 'Dyspraxia' indicates more the large range of processing difficulties experienced by our children. Everything is interdependent. Viewcontent.cgi (application/pdf Object)