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What to do when your video is winning social media, but it’s a copy that’s getting the clicks? What should a news organization do when an unauthorized copy of video they produced is going viral on YouTube?

What to do when your video is winning social media, but it’s a copy that’s getting the clicks?

That’s the question Dallas ABC affiliate WFAA faced when a commentary by its veteran sportscaster Dale Hansen about gay football player Michael Sam, started to spread like wildfire on social media. In case you haven’t seen it: Or, as Upworthy put it: Old White Guy Drops A Monster Speech On Anti-Gay Football Teams. Seriously Impressive Performance. People loved it and spread it far and wide across their social networks — over 4.5 million plays at last count. One problem: That wasn’t an official WFAA video that was spreading. At the NewsBiz blog, WFAA web editor Matt Goodman writes about the thinking going on at WFAA at this point: After the segment ran, it took about 48 hours for the “Hansen Unplugged” commentary to claw its way to the top of Reddit. Instead of shoehorning it in, NowThis News is building video content that fits in where the audience lives. NowThis News, a leader in mobile/social/video, shifts its strategy and its personnel.

So what’s going on with NowThis News?

NowThis News, a leader in mobile/social/video, shifts its strategy and its personnel

Less than two years old, NowThis News immediately grabbed attention for what seems like a bold new proposition for news: short digital video that was built for mobile devices and social media. Some called it a CNN killer and thought it could be defining a new model that could bring television news into the 21st century. Consider this TechCrunch story from March 2013: The startup’s basic premise is this: because smartphones and tablets are eating into the time people otherwise spend watching TV, the old cable and evening news formats just don’t work. Six Seconds of Loopy Creativity, and Millions of Fans. J.

Six Seconds of Loopy Creativity, and Millions of Fans

Emilio Flores for The New York TimesSkye Townsend, 20, an actress in Los Angeles, likes using the Vine app. “Instagram is for your pictures and Twitter for your thoughts,” she said. “Vine is for your personality.” Set Destroyed During Fight On Live Talk Show In Jordan (VIDEO) Detroit and Michigan news, sports, community, entertainment, yellow pages and classifieds. Mashable. If you want to tune in to CNN's newest morning show, all you have to do is look to your Twitter feed.

mashable

CNN is partnering with Twitter for a new video series called Your 15 Second Morning, which will highlight one or more big topics from the day in a 15-second clip embedded natively on the social network and shared from CNN's main Twitter account. NBCUniversal Takes Stake in Digital Video News Network NowThis News. Joseph Moran/NBC.

NBCUniversal Takes Stake in Digital Video News Network NowThis News

Media - La vidéo courte anoblie par la BBC. Publié le 23 janvier 2014 En testant depuis une semaine le format court dans ses reportages, " The voice of England " offre à ce contenu une légitimité qui devrait chambouler les médias traditionnels.

Media - La vidéo courte anoblie par la BBC

Il ouvre aussi la voie à une nouvelle forme d'écriture journalistique... Instafax: The BBC's Experiment with Short-form Video News on Instagram. 16 January '14, 02:47pm Follow The BBC is testing a new way of distributing short news items via a new service called Instafax which uses Instagram to share videos and other information about news events, in a bid that they can be easily consumed by people on the go.

Instafax: The BBC's Experiment with Short-form Video News on Instagram

The experimental service looks to only have taken its fledgling steps online today, and provides short, concise summaries of the most salient facts of complex news stories in an easy-to-understand way. Naturally, it also encourages viewers to read the full story on the BBC’s website. You can see the first Instafax from the BBC News team below, clicking through to the post on Instagram reveals a little more information in the description of the video: The BBC isn’t the very first to try disseminating news in this way, NowThisNews has also been playing around with it, but it’s obviously one of the biggest, and has a massive potential audience. Featured Image Credit – NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP/Getty Images. Now This News: HuffPost Veterans Bake A Delicious Web Video Muffin Top. Instead of shoehorning it in, NowThis News is building video content that fits in where the audience lives.

NowThisNews réinvente la télévision sur mobile et sur... Instagram. "La télévision n'est pas morte, tellement pas morte du tout", rassure le fondateur de Business Insider, Henri Blodget, à l'occasion d'une table ronde sur la vidéo en ligne (résumée ici par Alice Antheaume sur Slate.fr).

NowThisNews réinvente la télévision sur mobile et sur... Instagram

Elle n'est pas morte, mais elle n'est plus consommée de la même manière. Le média qui l'a mieux compris, c'est NowThisNews, une "chaîne" d'infos en contenu destinée au mobile et à... Instagram. Lancée en septembre 2012 par deux anciens patrons du Huffington Post (notamment son ex CEO, Eric Hippeau), la start-up est la nouvelle coqueluche des médias outre-atlantique. Après avoir levé 10M$ en 2012 et 2013, NowThisNews vient de réaliser une nouvelle levée de fonds auprès de la chaîne NBC avec qui elle co-produira une trentaine de vidéos par semaine. Ce qui est intéressant avec NowThisNews, c'est que ce nouveau média réinvente le format des news télé en le pensant d'abord pour mobile.

Les vidéos sont accessibles sur toutes les plateformes. 5 ways newsrooms used Vine in its first year. It's been a whole year since Vine burst into the iOS App Store, encouraging people to think creatively about what video can achieve in six seconds.

5 ways newsrooms used Vine in its first year

Writing on the Vine blog, the team behind the app admitted they "didn't know what to expect" when it first launched on 24 January 2013. "To say that we've been blown away is an understatement," the blog continued. "The creative community that has embraced Vine's short, looping videos has shown that you can tell a whole story, make people laugh and even leave people speechless – in six seconds or less. " To mark the app's first birthday, Journalism.co.uk highlights five ways that newsrooms have used Vine. 1. Turkish reporter Tulin Daloglu, a columnist for Al-Monitor, was one of the first journalists to use Vine to cover breaking news, capturing the aftermath of a terrorist attack on the American Embassy in early February 2013. NBCNews announces original 15-second daily videos. MSNBC and NowThis News have launched a new, co-produced original 15-second daily video series titled 15 Seconds to Truth, which will dig into a big headline each day to uncover a truth hidden behind the day’s conventional wisdom and spin.

NBCNews announces original 15-second daily videos

The video series, launching on MSNBC, Facebook, and Twitter, builds on the recently formed partnership between the NBCUniversal News Group (which includes NBC News, MSNBC, CNBC and all related digital properties), and NowThis News, a news organisation that specialises in creating short-form video for audiences across social platforms, and popularised the format of 15 second news videos. In addition to distributing 15 Seconds to Truth across social and mobile platforms, MSNBC will air the news pieces on-air during its regular broadcast lineup as programmes transition in and out of commercial breaks. “MSNBC viewers want honest and informed perspectives that explore the often overlooked angles of important stories,” said Phil Griffin, president of MSNBC. NowThis News, le Netflix de l'info : Ces projets qui vont dépoussiérer le journalisme en ligne.