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British Fashion Council. At a press conference to open London Fashion Week Natalie Massenet, Chairman of the British Fashion Council, announced updated figures showing substantial growth in the UK fashion industry over the past five years.

British Fashion Council

The direct value of the UK fashion industry to the UK economy is £26 billion; up from £21 billion in 2009. Showing an increase of 22% in nominal terms (source: Oxford Economics 2014) The UK fashion industry is estimated to support 797,000 jobs (source: Oxford Economics 2014). This is a decrease of 2.3% from 2009 Whilst employment figures have dropped overall the increased contribution to UK GVA reflects higher productivity within the fashion sector. The British Fashion Council is committed to supporting growth in the sector which it hopes will lead to more employment opportunities Fashion’s total contribution to the economy via both indirect support for supply chain industries and induced spending of employee’s wage income is estimated to have risen to over £46 billion.

The Pros and Cons of Online Retailers vs. Brick-and-Mortar Stores. The Pros and Cons of Online Retailers vs.

The Pros and Cons of Online Retailers vs. Brick-and-Mortar Stores

Brick and Mortar Stores Moms love the convenience of online shopping – she can make a purchase in seconds from the comfort of her home. It means no more long lines with the kids in tow, and one less thing to add to her to-do list. However, there are certain in-store experiences that moms cannot get online. For instance, clothing can’t be tried on prior to purchase and toys can’t be felt for durability.

On the other hand, brick-and-mortar stores may not offer the seemingly endless selection that online retailers do. Here is a quick overview of the benefits of each retail approach, and how it affects moms: Why Brick-and-Mortar Stores Still Matter: 61% of consumers shop in-store, compared to only 31% who turn to the internet. Moms may also enjoy the personal connection with store employees, a well-executed store atmosphere, and the ability to touch and hold products before purchase.

The Many Benefits of Online Retailers: Which Will Moms Choose? First Marmite, next our clothes? How Brexit is set to affect how we shop.

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BHS. Independent Stores. Mary Portas. 95% of British people buy goods via internet retailers. In 2013, more than £91 billion was spent online That figure is expected to surpass £100 billion this yearOne in four British people now shop online at least once a week A Sting album - priced at £7.74 - was the first item bought online in 1994 By Thomas Burrows Published: 08:19 GMT, 12 August 2014 | Updated: 11:42 GMT, 12 August 2014 Twenty years since the first item was sold online, 95 per cent of British people are now buying goods via internet retailers.

95% of British people buy goods via internet retailers

On August 11, 1994, the Sting album 'Ten Summoner’s Tales' became the first online purchase for £7.74 and since then, people have taken to online shopping in their millions. Last year, more than £91 billion was spent online and that figure is expected to surpass £100 billion this year. Scroll down for video More than 25 per cent of British people surveyed in the research conducted by UK retailer Shop Direct said they shopped online while in bed (stock image used) 20 years of online shopping... and it all started with a Sting album.

Fashion: Impact of The Recession - UK - 2010 : Consumer market research report. The clothing sector has survived the recession, with the market growing 1.4% in 2009 to £41.3 billion and by an estimated 1.5% in 2010 to £41.9 billion.

Fashion: Impact of The Recession - UK - 2010 : Consumer market research report

While growth was limited due to weakened consumer spending, sales remained in positive territory. Mintel looks at what consumers’ attitudes to spending on clothes have been during this period and what the future holds. The clothing sector has survived the recession, with the market growing 1.4% in 2009 to £41.3 billion. Sales remained in positive territory, although growth was limited due to weakened consumer spending.Value retailers outperformed the market, with sales from these outlets growing by almost 6% in 2009 to reach £8.1 billion. This growth has been driven by consumers’ continued value consciousness and pressure on disposable income.Far from stopping spending on clothes last year, most people did not change their shopping habits.