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MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 08/11/13 Notice: EU Draft Resolution to Adopt a Definition of Food Fraud – Quoting our Definition. Primary Source: Food Fraud Initiative Get ready for government regulations addressing Food Fraud Prevention.

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 08/11/13 Notice: EU Draft Resolution to Adopt a Definition of Food Fraud – Quoting our Definition

The EU is defining Food Fraud, with a focus on prevention. This is a broad, holistic frame that covers all types of fraud conducted using food. This focus on Food Fraud and on prevention is consistent with other groups such as ISO, Interpol, and the Global Food Safety Initiative. It’s fantastic that we’re honing in on a harmonized set of terms and concepts before we all finish writing laws or implementing industry best practices.

The European Parliament created a Draft Resolution outlining a five-point plan following the “horsemeat fraud” scandal:European Parliament (2013). In this Draft Resolution there is a very interesting, broad focus beyond adulteration and beyond just human food. One of their recommendations is that the EU and Member States adopt a common definition of Food Fraud. The Food Fraud and prevention concepts are taking root around the world and in proposed laws. University of West London via YOUTUBE 19/02/16 Fraud in Food Supply Systems, Professor Chris Elliott - complete lecture. University of Manchester - 2016 - The Dynamics of Food Fraud: the interactions between criminal opportunity and market (dys)functionality in legitimate busi.

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHAMPTON - 2015 - SUPPLY CHAIN FOOD CRIME & FRAUD: A SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE REVIEW OF FOOD CRIMINALITY. UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA 11/03/13 To protect and defend...our food. Very few people in the United States are inclined to eat horse meat.

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA 11/03/13 To protect and defend...our food

It's not on the collective cultural palate—whatever its merits elsewhere in the world. Europeans aren't too fond of it on the whole either, as demonstrated by the recent uproar over the adulteration of beef in multiple countries there. Fortunately, so far at least, horse meat hasn't been found in the U.S., and with the help of the University of Minnesota National Center for Food Protection and Defense (NCFPD), horse meat and other edible casualties of Economically Motivated Adulteration (EMA) or "food fraud" are less likely to be on the menu anytime soon.

Big money motivation The horse meat scandal is one more addition to what has become a $10–15 billion per year problem in the food industry. And the problem is thought to be widespread. Still, EMA has caused serious health consequences, and so researchers with the NCFPD are developing tools to help regulators and the food industry reduce and prevent incidents.

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 27/02/15 Product Fraud and Product Counterfeiting as a Source of Terrorist Financing. If we stop Food Fraud will we stop the funding of terrorism?

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 27/02/15 Product Fraud and Product Counterfeiting as a Source of Terrorist Financing

No. But we’ll make a dent. Also, maybe more importantly, product fraud investigations often reveal intelligence on where and how terrorist networks are evolving. Our new article provides more insight. Our new article, Product Fraud and Product Counterfeiting as a Source of Terrorist Financing, was published this month in Security Journal (see the attachment below for the 5-1/2 year process to get published). The abstract is publically available: “ABSTRACT: This short contribution is a complementary addition that addresses unexplored aspects of our recent Security Journal article When Crime Events Defy Classification: The Case of Product Counterfeiting as White-Collar Crime. In our previous writings and presentations we have continued to emphasize the importance of separate focus areas on Food Safety, Food Defense/ Counter-Terrorism, and Food Fraud.

Even the review process can be very enlightening. Attachment: