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PATHOGENS 21/12/20 Validation of a Novel Commercial ELISA Test for the Detection of Antibodies against Coxiella burnetii. Q fever is a zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii, a Gram-negative pathogen with a complex life cycle and a high impact on public and animal health all over the world.

PATHOGENS 21/12/20 Validation of a Novel Commercial ELISA Test for the Detection of Antibodies against Coxiella burnetii

The symptoms are indistinguishable from those belonging to other diseases, and the disease could be symptomless. For these reasons, reliable laboratory tests are essential for an accurate diagnosis. The aim of this study was to validate a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test, named the Chorus Q Fever Phase II IgG and IgM Kit (DIESSE, Diagnostica Senese S.p.A), which is performed by an instrument named Chorus, a new device in medical diagnostics. This diagnostic test is employed for the detection of antibodies against C. burnetii Phase II antigens in acute disease. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE 17/04/19 Bayesian estimation of sensitivity and specificity of a PCR method to detect Coxiella burnetii in milk and vaginal secretions in sheep and goat samples. FRONT. VET. SCI. 05/11/20 Coxiella burnetii in Dromedary Camels (Camelus dromedarius): A Possible Threat for Humans and Livestock in North Africa and the Near and Middle East? Introduction Q fever is a neglected zoonotic disease caused by bacteria (1, 2).

FRONT. VET. SCI. 05/11/20 Coxiella burnetii in Dromedary Camels (Camelus dromedarius): A Possible Threat for Humans and Livestock in North Africa and the Near and Middle East?

It is generally admitted that clones of Coxiella burnetii, the etiologic agent of Q fever, circulate in wildlife and infects domestic ruminants. Very few bacteria are required to initiate the infection process (3). Usually, humans become infected through the aerosol route during contact with C. burnetii–positive domestic animals or their products (2, 4). Infection of humans concerns first the farmers and other professionals that have contacts with animals (e.g., veterinarians), but epidemics have been reported in other social groups. Regarding domestic ruminants, C. burnetii is responsible for epizooties with increased morbidity and mortality in livestock. PATHOGENS 25/10/20 Transstadial Transmission from Nymph to Adult of Coxiella burnetii by Naturally Infected Hyalomma lusitanicum. Coxiella burnetii (Derrick) Philip, the causative agent of Q fever, is mainly transmitted by aerosols, but ticks can also be a source of infection.

PATHOGENS 25/10/20 Transstadial Transmission from Nymph to Adult of Coxiella burnetii by Naturally Infected Hyalomma lusitanicum

Transstadial and transovarial transmission of C. burnetii by Hyalomma lusitanicum (Koch) has been suggested. There is a close relationship between this tick species, wild animals and C. burnetii but the transmission in a natural environment has not been demonstrated. In this study, we collected 80 engorged nymphs of H. lusitanicum from red deer and wild rabbits. They moult to adults under laboratory conditions and we feed them artificially through silicone membranes after a preconditioning period. C. burnetii DNA was tested in ticks, blood and faeces samples using real-time PCR. ►▼ Show Figures Figure 1 This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited ►▼ Show Figures.

BMC Veterinary Research 28/08/20 Comparison of three serological tests for the detection of Coxiella burnetii specific antibodies in European wild rabbits. Coxiella burnetii is the cause of Q fever or coxiellosis, a zoonotic bacterial disease of public health significance.

BMC Veterinary Research 28/08/20 Comparison of three serological tests for the detection of Coxiella burnetii specific antibodies in European wild rabbits

The life cycle of the C. burnetii include a wide range of host animal species, commonly farm livestocks, which act as reservoirs, transmitting the disease by shedding the bacterium into the environment. C. burnetii infections in cattle, sheep and goats are ususally asymptomatic but can cause production losses including abortions, infertility, still births, weak offsprings, metritis, mastitis and other reproductive disorders [1, 2]. C. burnetii can be shed in the urine, faeces, placental material and milk of infected animals [3]. The organism can persist in the environment in a spore-like form for several months increasing the likelihood of infection of a new host [4].

Heavy rainfall and high winds speeds have been thought to cause the spores to aerosolise facilitating air-bourne spread and infections through inhalation [5]. FRONT. VET. SCI. 10/07/20 Monitoring Coxiella burnetii Infection in Naturally Infected Dairy Sheep Flocks Throughout Four Lambing Seasons and Investigation of Viable Bacteria. Introduction Q fever is a widespread zoonosis caused by the intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii.

Résumé traduit de cette étude espagnole : Les résultats ont montré que l'infection peut rester active pendant plus de 5 ans si des mesures efficaces de contrôle et de biosécurité ne sont pas correctement mises en œuvre. – guatemalt

Goats and sheep are considered the main reservoir of C. burnetii, and both have a significant role as source of human infection (1, 2).

FRONT. VET. SCI. 10/07/20 Monitoring Coxiella burnetii Infection in Naturally Infected Dairy Sheep Flocks Throughout Four Lambing Seasons and Investigation of Viable Bacteria

Q fever causes abortions in small ruminants (3), and once C. burnetii enters into a flock, infection spreads rapidly. Infected animals shed C. burnetii through birth products, vaginal fluids, feces, milk, and urine for several weeks after abortion or normal parturition (4–10), but the bacterial load shed by aborted animals is higher than that shed by those that deliver normally (9). Abortion rates due to C. burnetii are especially high in goats (up to 70–90%) (4, 11) but lower in sheep (usually below 6%) (12). Coxiella burnetii shedding by infected animals, together with their movements in indoor animal premises, promotes the formation of contaminated aerosols. JOURNAL OF VETERINARY INTERNAL MEDICINE 06/08/18 Management of Coxiella burnetii infection in livestock populations and the associated zoonotic risk: A consensus statement. Abstract Infections caused by Coxiella burnetii, commonly referred to as coxiellosis when occurring in animals and Query fever when occurring in humans, are an important cause of abortions, decreased reproductive efficiency, and subclinical infections in ruminants.

JOURNAL OF VETERINARY INTERNAL MEDICINE 06/08/18 Management of Coxiella burnetii infection in livestock populations and the associated zoonotic risk: A consensus statement

The organism also represents an important zoonotic concern associated with its ability to aerosolize easily and its low infectious dose. Available diagnostic tests have limited sensitivity, which combined with the absence of treatment options in animals and limited approaches to prevention, result in difficulty managing this agent for optimal animal health and zoonotic disease outcomes. Rev. Bras. Parasitol. Vet. vol.28 no.2 Jaboticabal Apr./June 2019 Coxiella burnetii associated with BVDV (Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus), BoHV (Bovine Herpesvirus), Leptospira spp., Neospora caninum, Toxoplasma gondii and Trypanosoma vivax in reproductive d. References.

Rev. Bras. Parasitol. Vet. vol.28 no.2 Jaboticabal Apr./June 2019 Coxiella burnetii associated with BVDV (Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus), BoHV (Bovine Herpesvirus), Leptospira spp., Neospora caninum, Toxoplasma gondii and Trypanosoma vivax in reproductive d

MICROMACHINES 27/06/19 Detection of Coxiella burnetii Using Silicon Microring Resonator in Patient Blood Plasma. One Health Volume 6, December 2018, Seroprevlance of Coxiella burnetii among abattoir and slaughterhouse workers: A meta-analysis. A.

One Health Volume 6, December 2018, Seroprevlance of Coxiella burnetii among abattoir and slaughterhouse workers: A meta-analysis

AbebePrevalence of Q fever infection in the Addis Ababa abattoir Ethiop. Med. J., 28 (1990), pp. 119-122 A. VETERINARY WORLD 12/08/18 Molecular and immunological characterization of Hyalomma dromedarii and Hyalomma excavatum (Acari: Ixodidae) vectors of Q fever in camels. Research (Published online: 12-08-2018) 14.

VETERINARY WORLD 12/08/18 Molecular and immunological characterization of Hyalomma dromedarii and Hyalomma excavatum (Acari: Ixodidae) vectors of Q fever in camels

Molecular and immunological characterization of Hyalomma dromedarii and Hyalomma excavatum (Acari: Ixodidae) vectors of Q fever in camels Hend H. ARCHIVES OF PUBLIC HEALTH 06/01/18 Farming, Q fever and public health: agricultural practices and beyond. The pleomorphic etiological agent of Q fever, C. burnetii is an intracellular bacterium that replicates in the parasitophorous vacuole of the parasitized cell (generally a macrophage or a trophoblast).

ARCHIVES OF PUBLIC HEALTH 06/01/18 Farming, Q fever and public health: agricultural practices and beyond

The parasitic activity of this bacterium consists of building a finely orchestrated machinery that diverts the normal metabolism of the parasitized cell to become a surviving container devoted to the proliferation of the bacterium [7]. C. burnetii has a broad host range (with a role in dissemination or maintenance of the disease) and is found in unicellular organisms, invertebrates, birds and mammals [8]. Domestic ruminants are the primary reservoir for human infection, and the majority of human epidemics are related to exposure to small ruminant (sheep and goats) infected products (placenta membranes, birth fluids, animal excretions or contaminated dust) [9, 10]. Bulgarian Journal of Veterinary Medicine - 2017 - ROLE OF COXIELLA BURNETII IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF FEVER OF UNKNOWN ORIGIN: А MINI REVIEW. CDC EID - MAI 2017 - Au sommaire notamment: No Such Thing as Chronic Q Fever. Author affiliations: French National Referral Center for Q Fever, Marseille, France Highlight and copy the desired format.

Abstract Modern diagnostic methods enable clinicians to look beyond a diagnosis of chronic Q fever and discern whether patients instead have persistent focalized Coxiella burnetii infection(s). Use of these methods and development of criteria to define and treat such infections, especially cardiovascular infections, will improve the prognosis for patients previously thought to have chronic Q fever. VETERINARY RESEARCH 05/04/16 Spread of Coxiella burnetii between dairy cattle herds in an enzootic region: modelling contributions of airborne transmission and trade.

Our findings showed that airborne transmission and movement of cows both affected the regional spread of C. burnetii, but with different capacities. On the one hand, airborne transmission had the ability to introduce C. burnetii in a large number of herds, but the generated outbreaks were generally predicted to be ephemeral and small. On the other hand, animal trade was predicted to result in only 8% of new infections; however, purchasing an infectious cow could instigate comparatively larger outbreaks. The differences in the impact of each transmission route on the intra-herd infection dynamics arose from the intrinsic nature of these transmission routes in spreading C. burnetii. Regardless the route, the first generated local infection was always a cow with health status I − as shown in Figure 2. Such a seronegative shedding cow is a transient shedder, which can become susceptible again. Irrespective of the benefits, mechanistic models are generally difficult to fit to data.

WAGENINGEN UNIVERSITY 06/05/14 Land-applied contaminated manure another source of spread of Q fever. Q fever is a zoonosis, an infectious disease that can be transferred from animals to humans. Previous research had shown that there is a spatial relationship between goat farms that were contaminated with Q fever and the incidence of the illness among humans. As expected more people became ill in the vicinity of contaminated farms that those living at a distance from these farms. “But,” says Alterra researcher Tia Hermans, “we saw that living in the vicinity of goat farms could only explain the Q fever contamination in just over 50% of the cases. So there had to be another factor at play here.” Research carried out by the Central Veterinary Institute showed that manure from goats can still be contaminated with Q fever up to a maximum of 3 months after lambing. Epidemiol. Infect. (2015), 143, 3316–3326. Q fever infection in dairy cattle herds: increased risk with high wind speed and low precipitation.

CDC EID - Volume 21, Number 7—July 2015. Chronic Q Fever Diagnosis—Consensus Guideline versus Expert Opinion ; Linda M. Kampschreur ( , Marjolijn C.A. Wegdam-Blans, Peter C. Wever, Nicole H.M. Renders, Corine E. Author affiliations: Jeroen Bosch Hospital, ’s-Hertogenbosch, the Netherlands (L.M. Suggested citation for this article Abstract. CDC EID - Volume 21, Number 6—June 2015 - European Rabbits as Reservoir for Coxiella burnetii.

Author affiliations: Spanish Wildlife Research Institute, Ciudad Real, Spain (D. González-Barrio, F. Ruiz-Fons); University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal (E. Maio, M. PLOS 15/05/15 The Recent Evolution of a Maternally-Inherited Endosymbiont of Ticks Led to the Emergence of the Q Fever Pathogen, Coxiella burnetii. Abstract Q fever is a highly infectious disease with a worldwide distribution. Its causative agent, the intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii, infects a variety of vertebrate species, including humans. Its evolutionary origin remains almost entirely unknown and uncertainty persists regarding the identity and lifestyle of its ancestors. A few tick species were recently found to harbor maternally-inherited Coxiella-like organisms engaged in symbiotic interactions, but their relationships to the Q fever pathogen remain unclear.

Here, we extensively sampled ticks, identifying new and atypical Coxiella strains from 40 of 58 examined species, and used this data to infer the evolutionary processes leading to the emergence of C. burnetii. Author Summary. MICROBIOLOGY AUSTRALIA 18/09/13 Q fever: pets, vets and validating tests. Download PDF Article Published: 18 September 2013. INTERDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES ON INFECTIOUS DISEASES - 2012 - Q Fever: An Old but Still a Poorly Understood Disease. International Journal of Microbiology - 2011 - Q Fever: Current State of Knowledge and Perspectives of Research of a Neglected Z. PLOS 07/06/12 Q Fever and Pneumonia in an Area with a High Livestock Density: A Large Population-Based Study.

Concerns about public health risks of intensive animal production in the Netherlands continue to rise, in particular related to outbreaks of infectious diseases. INTECH - AVRIL 2012 - Zoonosis. Au sommaire: Coxiella burnetii. Edited by Jacob Lorenzo-Morales, ISBN 978-953-51-0479-7, 448 pages, Publisher: InTech, Chapters published April 04, 2012 under CC BY 3.0 licenseDOI: 10.5772/2125 Edited Volume Zoonotic diseases are mainly caused by bacterial, viral or parasitic agents although "unconventional agents" such as prions could also be involved in causing zoonotic diseases. RIVM 19/12/11 Detection of Coxiella burnetii DNA in animal and environmental matrices on non-dairy sheep farms.

CDC EID – DEC 2011 - Proximity to Goat Farms and Coxiella burnetii Seroprevalence among Pregnant Women. Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options CDC Home CDC 24/7: Saving Lives. Protecting People.™ <div class="noscript"> Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported by your browser. RIVM 25/10/11 Q fever: the answer is blowing in the wind : Detection of Coxiella burnetii in aerosols.

MINLNV (PAYS BAS) - FEVRIER 2010 - Q fever conference. RIVM 31/05/11 A query for Coxiella in veterinary and environmental matrices. RIVM 31/05/11 Molecular detection and typing of Coxiella burnetii. RIVM - JANVIER 2010 - Q fever transmission to humans and local environmental conditions. BMC Infectious Diseases 2010, 10:69 The use of a geographic information system to identify a dairy goat farm as the most likely. BMC Veterinary Research 2011, 7:13 Q fever abortions in ruminants and associated on-farm risk factors in northern Cyprus. ISBT Science Series - 2011 - XMRV, Q fever and other emerging infections: impact on management of blood safety.