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WILDLIFE SOCIETY BULLETIN 25/09/18 Assessing agricultural damage by wild boar using drones. In Flanders (northern Belgium), wild boar (Sus scrofa) returned in 2006 after 50 years of absence and the population is increasing, both in abundance and geographic extent.

WILDLIFE SOCIETY BULLETIN 25/09/18 Assessing agricultural damage by wild boar using drones

In the absence of wild boar, Flanders’ landscape structure changed into a dense, mosaic‐like pattern of agricultural, natural, and urban areas. The return of the wild boar increasingly leads to human–wildlife conflicts, mainly linked to damage in agriculture. Hence, there is a growing need for a time‐efficient, standardized, and accurate method to assess crop damage. We present an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle‐based method, using Geographic Object‐Based Image Analysis and Random Forests to estimate the damaged area and associated yield losses, between 2015 and 2017, due to wild boar in individual fields in Flanders.

Our approach resulted in an 84.50% overall accuracy in calculating damaged area for maize fields and 94.40% for grasslands. PORTLAND PRESS 15/03/21 Plant pest surveillance: from satellites to molecules. Plant disease changes how solar radiation interacts with leaves, canopy, and plant energy balance, which can be detected with proximal (non-aerial) and remote (aerial) sensing [21,22].

PORTLAND PRESS 15/03/21 Plant pest surveillance: from satellites to molecules

SIU_EDU 01/08/18 The future of agriculture: using drones to fight crop diseases. Lindsey McKinzie – Lindsey McKinzie working in a laboratory at Southern Illinois University Carbondale.

SIU_EDU 01/08/18 The future of agriculture: using drones to fight crop diseases

(Photo provided) August 01, 2018 by Hannah Erickson CARBONDALE, Ill. — With the demand for food higher than ever, farmers don’t have time to struggle with plant diseases and crop failures. Remote Sensing of Environment Volume 231, 15 September 2019, Delineation of agricultural fields in smallholder farms from satellite images using fully convolutional networks and combinatorial grouping. Arbeláez et al., 2011 P.

Remote Sensing of Environment Volume 231, 15 September 2019, Delineation of agricultural fields in smallholder farms from satellite images using fully convolutional networks and combinatorial grouping

Arbeláez, M. Maire, C. Fowlkes, J. MalikContour detection and hierarchical image segmentation Badrinarayanan et al., 2017 V. Bergado et al., 2016 J.R. Photogrammetric Engineering & Remote Sensing, - FEV 2020 - Multi-Spatial Resolution Satellite and sUAS Imagery for Precision Agriculture on Smallholder Farms in Malawi. MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 05/09/19 MSU student uses drone technology to support family farm, soybean research. PLOS 28/03/16 Characterizing Forest Change Using Community-Based Monitoring Data and Landsat Time Series. EUPHRESCO 26/11/18 The Applications of Remote Sensing in Plant Health (PHeRS) UNION LEADER 24/06/18 UNH scientists experiment with drones to collect forestry data. June 24. 2018 10:45PM Doctoral student Benjamin Fraser evaluates the effectiveness of using unmanned aerial systems to understand changes in natural environments.

UNION LEADER 24/06/18 UNH scientists experiment with drones to collect forestry data

IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON 26/04/17 Drones that detect early plant disease could save crops. AFRICAN JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH 20/10/16 A review of geographic information systems and digital imaging in plant pathology application. The increasing rate of disease incidence resulting from devastating effects of plant pathogens, limits crop productivity globally, thus affecting food security.

AFRICAN JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH 20/10/16 A review of geographic information systems and digital imaging in plant pathology application

The current global population growth with many mouths to feed is dependent on vibrant agricultural productivity. The effects of globalization, climate change, evolution of pathogens and vectors to mention a few, have combined to increase spread of invasive plant pathogens. International Journal of Information Technology Vol. 12 No. 6 2006 Comparison of a Self Organising Map and Simple Evolving Connectionist System for Predicting Insect Pest Establishment. IEEE Workshop on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IWGRS - NOV 2015 - A Low Cost Mobile Geospatial Solution to Manage Field Survey Data Collection of Plant Pests and Diseases. NeoBiota 18: 119–130 (2013) Improving pest risk assessment and management through the aid of geospatial information technology s. LOUISIANA AGRICULTURE - WINTER 2014 - Investigating the Potential for Drone Use in Agriculture.

FARMERS WEEKLY 22/01/14 Drones to have a bigger role in mapping arable crops. THE NEWS 16/12/13 Agriculture is the most promising market for drones. Idaho farmer Robert Blair isn’t waiting around for federal aviation officials to work out rules for drones.

THE NEWS 16/12/13 Agriculture is the most promising market for drones

He and a friend built their own, outfitting it with cameras and using it to monitor his 1,500 acres (600 hectares). Under 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) and 5 feet (1.5 meters) long nose to tail, the aircraft is the size of a turkey. Blair uses it to get a birds-eye view of his cows and fields of wheat, peas, barley and alfalfa. “It’s a great tool to collect information to make better decisions, and we’re just scratching the surface of what it can do for farmers,” said Blair, who lives in Kendrick, Idaho, roughly 275 miles (440 kilometres) north of Boise. While Americans are abuzz about Amazon’s plans to use self-guided drones to deliver packages, most future unmanned aircraft may operate far from the nation’s large population centres. So far, drones have been used mainly by the military.

The Federal Aviation Administration does not allow drones’ commercial use. AP 26/06/13 Oregon drone mission: monitoring potato plant health. View full size A 6-pound HawkEye remote-controlled aircraft will monitor potato fields during research trials beginning this spring.

AP 26/06/13 Oregon drone mission: monitoring potato plant health

Tetracam Inc. HERMISTON — A meeting at the Hermiston Chamber of Commerce has focused on a new mission for the unmanned aircraft known as drones: keeping eastern Oregon potatoes happy. The East Oregonian reports that more than 100 guests discussed the emerging technology Tuesday at a panel discussion. The Federal Aviation Administration recently authorized the use of drones to fly over Oregon State University potato fields in search of unhealthy plants.

WESTERN FARM PRESS 22/07/13 Drones and pesticide spraying a promising partnership. UC Davis researchers test a remote-controlled helicopter to spray pesticides on vineyards, which are normally sprayed using ground vehicles.

WESTERN FARM PRESS 22/07/13 Drones and pesticide spraying a promising partnership

Yamaha, who supplies Japanese rice farmers with flying sprayers, provided the helicopter for these tests. Photos taken at the UC Davis Oakville Station in Oakville, Calif. on May 7, 2013. Photo: Joe Proudman/UC Davis. MODERN FARMER 28/11/13 Using Drones in the Fight Against Apple Scab. For apple growers in the eastern United States, the biggest problem – the most relentless, pervasive, unavoidable issue, which can ruin a whole crop if not managed aggressively – is apple scab.

MODERN FARMER 28/11/13 Using Drones in the Fight Against Apple Scab

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire are working on a new tool to combat the apple scourge: A drone. The fungal infection causes dark scabby lesions on the leaves and skin of the apple, which leaves the flavor unaffected, but does effectively make it unsalable. SCIENCE DAILY 24/07/13 Seeing Photosynthesis from Space: NASA Scientists Use Satellites to Measure Plant Health. NASA scientists have established a new way to use satellites to measure what's occurring inside plants at a cellular level.

Plants grow and thrive through photosynthesis, a process that converts sunlight into energy. During photosynthesis, plants emit what is called fluorescence -- light invisible to the naked eye but detectable by satellites orbiting hundreds of miles above Earth. NASA scientists have now established a method to turn this satellite data into global maps of the subtle phenomenon in more detail than ever before.