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IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON 26/04/17 Drones that detect early plant disease could save crops. AFRICAN JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH 20/10/16 A review of geographic information systems and digital imaging in plant pathology application. The increasing rate of disease incidence resulting from devastating effects of plant pathogens, limits crop productivity globally, thus affecting food security.

AFRICAN JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH 20/10/16 A review of geographic information systems and digital imaging in plant pathology application

The current global population growth with many mouths to feed is dependent on vibrant agricultural productivity. The effects of globalization, climate change, evolution of pathogens and vectors to mention a few, have combined to increase spread of invasive plant pathogens. Consequently, early detection of pathogens, accurate diagnosis and assessment and surveillance are imperative to predicting disease outbreaks and ample time to develop and apply appropriate mitigation measures for crop protection and enhanced productivity.

Diagnosis is the process to determine cause of disease, while detection deals with knowing pathogen. Both disease diagnosis and pathogen detection are central to protecting crops and natural plant systems, as well as crucial prelude to undertaking prevention and management measures. International Journal of Information Technology Vol. 12 No. 6 2006 Comparison of a Self Organising Map and Simple Evolving Connectionist System for Predicting Insect Pest Establishment. IEEE Workshop on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IWGRS - NOV 2015 - A Low Cost Mobile Geospatial Solution to Manage Field Survey Data Collection of Plant Pests and Diseases.

NeoBiota 18: 119–130 (2013) Improving pest risk assessment and management through the aid of geospatial information technology s.

NeoBiota 18: 119–130 (2013) Improving pest risk assessment and management through the aid of geospatial information technology standards – guatemalt

LOUISIANA AGRICULTURE - WINTER 2014 - Investigating the Potential for Drone Use in Agriculture. FARMERS WEEKLY 22/01/14 Drones to have a bigger role in mapping arable crops. THE NEWS 16/12/13 Agriculture is the most promising market for drones. Idaho farmer Robert Blair isn’t waiting around for federal aviation officials to work out rules for drones.

THE NEWS 16/12/13 Agriculture is the most promising market for drones

He and a friend built their own, outfitting it with cameras and using it to monitor his 1,500 acres (600 hectares). Under 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) and 5 feet (1.5 meters) long nose to tail, the aircraft is the size of a turkey. Blair uses it to get a birds-eye view of his cows and fields of wheat, peas, barley and alfalfa. “It’s a great tool to collect information to make better decisions, and we’re just scratching the surface of what it can do for farmers,” said Blair, who lives in Kendrick, Idaho, roughly 275 miles (440 kilometres) north of Boise. While Americans are abuzz about Amazon’s plans to use self-guided drones to deliver packages, most future unmanned aircraft may operate far from the nation’s large population centres.

So far, drones have been used mainly by the military. The Federal Aviation Administration does not allow drones’ commercial use. AP 26/06/13 Oregon drone mission: monitoring potato plant health. View full size A 6-pound HawkEye remote-controlled aircraft will monitor potato fields during research trials beginning this spring.

AP 26/06/13 Oregon drone mission: monitoring potato plant health

Tetracam Inc. HERMISTON — A meeting at the Hermiston Chamber of Commerce has focused on a new mission for the unmanned aircraft known as drones: keeping eastern Oregon potatoes happy. WESTERN FARM PRESS 22/07/13 Drones and pesticide spraying a promising partnership. UC Davis researchers test a remote-controlled helicopter to spray pesticides on vineyards, which are normally sprayed using ground vehicles.

WESTERN FARM PRESS 22/07/13 Drones and pesticide spraying a promising partnership

Yamaha, who supplies Japanese rice farmers with flying sprayers, provided the helicopter for these tests. Photos taken at the UC Davis Oakville Station in Oakville, Calif. on May 7, 2013. Photo: Joe Proudman/UC Davis Like so many technological innovations improved upon and perfected by the military, the use of unmanned drones in agricultural production presents an intriguing possibility that has a good chance of catching on in the United States. I read with amazement several recent news articles about the research being conducted by the Yamaha Motor Corp. To Americans the scenario might seem mindboggling but the fact is that drones have been in use in Japan for the last 20 years. Agricultural research on uses of unmanned aircraft is becoming more visible throughout the United States.

MODERN FARMER 28/11/13 Using Drones in the Fight Against Apple Scab. For apple growers in the eastern United States, the biggest problem – the most relentless, pervasive, unavoidable issue, which can ruin a whole crop if not managed aggressively – is apple scab.

MODERN FARMER 28/11/13 Using Drones in the Fight Against Apple Scab

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire are working on a new tool to combat the apple scourge: A drone. The fungal infection causes dark scabby lesions on the leaves and skin of the apple, which leaves the flavor unaffected, but does effectively make it unsalable. “It’s a huge issue,” says Peter Wagner, owner of Applecrest Farm Orchards, a 110-acre orchard in southeast New Hampshire.

“Thirty years ago, you were allowed to have a scab on your apple that was probably 10 millimeters, or half the size of a dime, without a problem at all. Now you can’t put any of that in the apple pack, so it renders the apple unmarketable.” SCIENCE DAILY 24/07/13 Seeing Photosynthesis from Space: NASA Scientists Use Satellites to Measure Plant Health.

NASA scientists have established a new way to use satellites to measure what's occurring inside plants at a cellular level.

SCIENCE DAILY 24/07/13 Seeing Photosynthesis from Space: NASA Scientists Use Satellites to Measure Plant Health

Plants grow and thrive through photosynthesis, a process that converts sunlight into energy. During photosynthesis, plants emit what is called fluorescence -- light invisible to the naked eye but detectable by satellites orbiting hundreds of miles above Earth. NASA scientists have now established a method to turn this satellite data into global maps of the subtle phenomenon in more detail than ever before.

Healthy plants use the energy from sunlight to perform photosynthesis, and re-emit some of that light as a faint but measureable glow. In short, abundant fluorescence indicates active photosynthesis and a well functioning plant, while low or no fluorescence can mean that the plant is stressed or shutting down.