background preloader

Rage en Afrique

Facebook Twitter

PLOS 06/01/17 High Incidence of Human Rabies Exposure in North Western Tigray, Ethiopia: A Four-Year Retrospective Study. Abstract Background Rabies is a fatal zoonotic disease that has been known in Ethiopia for centuries in society as “Mad Dog Disease”.

PLOS 06/01/17 High Incidence of Human Rabies Exposure in North Western Tigray, Ethiopia: A Four-Year Retrospective Study

It is an important disease with veterinary and public health significance in the North western zone of Tigray where previous studies have not been conducted. Frequent occurrence of outbreaks in the area led the researchers to carry out a four year retrospective study to estimate the incidence of human rabies exposure in Northwestern Tigray, Ethiopia. Methodology A referent study was conducted on human rabies exposure cases recorded from 2012 to 2015 at Suhul hospital, Shire Endaselase, Northwestern Tigray, Ethiopia.

Principal findings The majority of the exposed cases were males (1363/2180, 63%). Conclusion The study discovered the highest annual human rabies exposure incidence in Ethiopia. Author Summary Rabies is a deadly disease of human and animals. Editor: Charles E. Molecular Characterization of Canine Rabies Virus, Mali, 2006–2013 - Volume 22, Number 5—May 2016. PLOS 12/04/16 Mobile Phones As Surveillance Tools: Implementing and Evaluating a Large-Scale Intersectoral Surveillance System for Rabies in Tanzania. Citation: Mtema Z, Changalucha J, Cleaveland S, Elias M, Ferguson HM, Halliday JEB, et al. (2016) Mobile Phones As Surveillance Tools: Implementing and Evaluating a Large-Scale Intersectoral Surveillance System for Rabies in Tanzania.

PLOS 12/04/16 Mobile Phones As Surveillance Tools: Implementing and Evaluating a Large-Scale Intersectoral Surveillance System for Rabies in Tanzania

PLoS Med 13(4): e1002002. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1002002 Published: April 12, 2016 Copyright: © 2016 Mtema et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Funding: This study was funded by the UBS Optimus Foundation ( and the Wellcome Trust (082715/B/07/Z and 095787/Z/11/Z to KH) and the Research and Policy for Infectious Disease Dynamics Program of the Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security, Fogarty International Centre, National Institute of Health.

Competing interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. CDC EID – MARS 2016 – Au sommaire notamment: Mycobacterium microti Infection in Dairy Goats, France. Suggested citation for this article To the Editor: Dog bites are a serious public health problem because of the associated risk for rabies virus exposure in countries to which the virus is endemic (1,2).

CDC EID – MARS 2016 – Au sommaire notamment: Mycobacterium microti Infection in Dairy Goats, France

Human rabies can be prevented by administration of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP). However, PEP rabies vaccine may be unavailable or prohibitively expensive (3). Delay in or failure to receive PEP after possible rabies virus exposure contributes to increased incidence of human rabies deaths (3). We performed a retrospective investigation of animal bites and postbite treatment in Laikipia North sub-county, Kenya, during January 2013–February 2014. During January 1, 2013–February 10, 2014, a total of 106 bites were recorded by 6 government-run health facilities in Laikipia North.

The deaths of 3 humans reported to the ZDU occurred in November and December 2013. Of the 11 traced bite case-patients, 9 washed their wound before going to a healthcare facility and 8 were prescribed PEP. FAO - AVRIL 2014 - EMPRES360 Au sommaire: FAO ’s contribution to improve rabies control in West and Central Africa. PLOS 19/06/14 Eliminating Rabies in Tanzania? Local Understandings and Responses to Mass Dog Vaccination in Kilombero and Ulanga Districts (Tanzanie) Abstract Background With increased global attention to neglected diseases, there has been a resurgence of interest in eliminating rabies from developing countries through mass dog vaccination.

PLOS 19/06/14 Eliminating Rabies in Tanzania? Local Understandings and Responses to Mass Dog Vaccination in Kilombero and Ulanga Districts (Tanzanie)

Tanzania recently embarked on an ambitious programme to repeatedly vaccinate dogs in 28 districts. To understand community perceptions and responses to this programme, we conducted an anthropological study exploring the relationships between dogs, society, geography and project implementation in the districts of Kilombero and Ulanga, Southern Tanzania. Methodology/Principal Findings Over three months in 2012, we combined the use of focus groups, semi-structured interviews, a household questionnaire and a population-based survey. Conclusions and Significance Author Summary Mass vaccination of dogs is the most effective strategy to eliminate dog-mediated human rabies from developing countries.

EPIREG MAGHREB - 2009 - Rage : Réglementation en Algérie, au Maroc et en Tunisie. GESNERUS - 2007 - La rage en Tunisie au XIXe siècle: recrudescence ou émergence?

Rage au Nigéria

Journal of wildlife diseases (Impact Factor: 1.31). 05/2002 Development of a bait and baiting system for delivery of oral rabies vaccine to free-ranging African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus). SOUTHERN AFRICAN SOCIETY FOR VETERINARY EPIDEMIOLOGY - AOUT 2013 - Proceedings of the 11th annual congress of the Southern Afric. CDC EID - Volume 19, Number 4—April 2013 - Au sommaire notamment:Discrepancies in Data Reporting for Rabies, Africa. Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options CDC Home CDC 24/7: Saving Lives.

CDC EID - Volume 19, Number 4—April 2013 - Au sommaire notamment:Discrepancies in Data Reporting for Rabies, Africa

Protecting People.™ <div class="noscript"> Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported by your browser. PASTEUR 31/03/09 La rage en Afrique : des origines à la lutte actuelle. CDC EID – JANV 2012 - Risk for Rabies Importation from North Africa . Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options CDC Home CDC 24/7: Saving Lives.

CDC EID – JANV 2012 - Risk for Rabies Importation from North Africa .

Protecting People.™ <div class="noscript"> Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported by your browser. Emerging Infectious Disease ISSN: 1080-6059 Facebook Reccomend Twitter Tweet Share Compartir Volume 17, Number 12—December 2011 Risk for Rabies Importation from North Africa Medscape, LLC is pleased to provide online continuing medical education (CME) for this journal article, allowing clinicians the opportunity to earn CME credit. This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of Medscape, LLC and Emerging Infectious Diseases.

Medscape, LLC designates this Journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Learning Objectives Editor P. Contact Us. Evolutionary History of Rabies in Ghana. Abstract Rabies virus (RABV) is enzootic throughout Africa, with the domestic dog (Canis familiaris) being the principal vector.

Evolutionary History of Rabies in Ghana

Dog rabies is estimated to cause 24,000 human deaths per year in Africa, however, this estimate is still considered to be conservative. Two sub-Saharan African RABV lineages have been detected in West Africa. Lineage 2 is present throughout West Africa, whereas Africa 1a dominates in northern and eastern Africa, but has been detected in Nigeria and Gabon, and Africa 1b was previously absent from West Africa.

A retrospective longitudinal study of animal and human rabies in Botswana 1989-2006.