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Pesticides et herbes médicinales chinoises

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Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B Volume 5, Issue 1, January 2015, Safety issues and new rapid detection methods in traditional Chinese medicinal materials. Abstract The safety of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a major strategic issue that involves human health.

Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B Volume 5, Issue 1, January 2015, Safety issues and new rapid detection methods in traditional Chinese medicinal materials

With the continuous improvement in disease prevention and treatment, the export of TCM and its related products has increased dramatically in China. However, the frequent safety issues of Chinese medicine have become the ‘bottleneck’ impeding the modernization of TCM. It was proved that mycotoxins seriously affect TCM safety; the pesticide residues of TCM are a key problem in TCM international trade; adulterants have also been detected, which is related to market circulation.

These three factors have greatly affected TCM safety. Graphical abstract Adulterants, mycotoxins pollution and pesticide residues are “bottlenecks” that affect use and export of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Key Words Traditional Chinese medicine; Safety issue; Rapid detection; Mycotoxins; Pesticide residues; Authentication; 2D DNA barcodes; Traceability Abbreviations 1. 1.1. 1.2. 1.3. 2. 2.1. 2.1.1.

7SUR7 24/06/13 Les herbes médicinales chinoises polluées par les pesticides. Édité par: Caroline Albert 24/06/13 - 14h14 Source: Belga © thinkstock.

7SUR7 24/06/13 Les herbes médicinales chinoises polluées par les pesticides

Les herbes traditionnellement consommées en Chine pour leurs effets bénéfiques sur la santé sont souvent polluées par des pesticides, a révélé Greenpeace dans une étude publiée lundi. Certains niveaux de concentration de ces substances mesurés par l'organisation écologiste sont plusieurs centaines de fois supérieurs aux normes de sécurité alimentaire en vigueur dans l'Union européenne. "Les résultats des tests font la lumière sur les failles du système actuel d'agriculture industrielle fortement dépendant de produits chimiques toxiques, aux dépens de la santé humaine et de l'environnement", affirme Jing Wang, responsable de la campagne de Greenpeace pour une agriculture biologique.

AFP 24/06/13 Pesticides tainting traditional China herbs: Greenpeace. This file photo shows a sculpture of a Chinese pharmacist preparing herbs, outside a Chinese traditional medicine facility, in Beijing, on August 3, 2007.

AFP 24/06/13 Pesticides tainting traditional China herbs: Greenpeace

Traditional Chinese herbs are being contaminated with a toxic cocktail of pesticides that poses a threat to consumer health and the environment, campaign group Greenpeace said on Monday. (AFP/File) BANGKOK POST 24/06/13 Chinese herbs 'tainted' by pesticides. This file photo shows a sculpture of a Chinese pharmacist preparing herbs, outside a Chinese traditional medicine facility, in Beijing, on August 3, 2007.

BANGKOK POST 24/06/13 Chinese herbs 'tainted' by pesticides

Traditional Chinese herbs are being contaminated with a toxic cocktail of pesticides, campaign group Greenpeace said on Monday. Some residue levels were hundreds of times higher than European Union food safety standards, according to tests carried out for a Greenpeace report "Chinese herbs: elixir of health or pesticides cocktail? ", the latest to focus on the harmful effects of China's large-scale farming industry. "These test results expose the cracks in the current industrial agriculture system that is heavily reliant on toxic chemicals at the expense of human and environmental health," said Greenpeace ecological farming campaigner Jing Wang.

"Chinese herbs are trusted and used as food ingredients for healing purposes by millions of people around the world. About the author Writer: AFP Position: News agency. GREENPEACE 24/06/13 Exposed: toxic pesticides cocktail revealed in traditional Chinese herbs. Exposed: toxic pesticides cocktail revealed in traditional Chinese herbs 2013-06-24 at 19:00 - Greenpeace East Asia tests on 65 traditional Chinese herbal products have exposed a toxic cocktail of pesticide residues, some of them illegal in China, highlighting the need to end the use of industrial agricultural chemicals.

GREENPEACE 24/06/13 Exposed: toxic pesticides cocktail revealed in traditional Chinese herbs

The Greenpeace East Asia report, 'Chinese herbs: elixir of health or pesticides cocktail? ', shows that Chinese herbal products were covered in pesticide residues considered highly hazardous by the World Health Organisation (WHO). Some of the residue levels were hundreds of times higher than EU food safety standards. (1) "These test results expose the cracks in the current industrial agriculture system that is heavily reliant on toxic chemicals at the expense of human and environmental health," said Jing Wang, ecological farming campaigner at Greenpeace East Asia.

Long-term exposure to pesticide residues in food may cause the toxic chemicals to accumulate inside the body. CHINADIALOGUE 28/08/13 Chinese herb farmers unaware of pesticide health risks. The excessive use of chemical fertilisers and pesticides in China is a major problem.

CHINADIALOGUE 28/08/13 Chinese herb farmers unaware of pesticide health risks

Figures from the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences’ (CAAS) Soil and Fertiliser Institute have shown that in half of Chinese provinces, average levels of nitrogen fertiliser use exceed the internationally accepted limit of 225kg per hectare. As well as degrading soil quality, overuse of pesticides has also been linked to food safety problems, as shown by the high levels of pesticide residue recently found in traditional Chinese herbs. Chinese agriculture appears to have become worryingly over-reliant on using pesticides. “Farmers use these chemicals as they feel like it,” Xu Ming, from the Ministry of Agriculture, told chinadialogue last year. “The Ministry of Agriculture has standards for use, but if the standard says to use one bottle cap’s worth of pesticide the farmers will use three, just to make sure.”

Auntie Ye, a honeysuckle farmer from Pingyi County, Shandong.