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Modélisation, Ebola et Marbourg

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CORNELL UNIVERSITY 25/04/17 Identifying spatiotemporal dynamics of Ebola in Sierra Leone using virus genomes. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2015 Jun;109(6):366-78. Mapping the zoonotic niche of Marburg virus disease in Africa. BLOG CIFOR 07/06/16 Mapping Ebola - A new method for tracking the virus could help prevent outbreaks. A micrograph of Ebola virus particles.

BLOG CIFOR 07/06/16 Mapping Ebola - A new method for tracking the virus could help prevent outbreaks.

Research into the biogeography of the virus is drawing connections between rainforests, animals and humans. NIAID Africa - The ongoing Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has claimed more than 11,000 lives since March 2014. Yet we still know very little about the conditions in which the virus thrives and how it spreads to humans. Some answers may be found in a groundbreaking new study that borrows techniques from biology and geography to map out hotspots where the virus may be lurking. A research team led by scientists John Fa and Robert Nasi from the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) together with Jesús Olivero and colleagues from the University of Málaga, including US virologist Jean Paul Gonzalez and Zoological Society of London wildlife epidemiologist Andrew Cunningham, took a biogeographical approach to mapping favorable conditions for the Ebola virus, both in terms of environment and the presence of animals as potential hosts.

CORNELL UNIVERSITY 30/07/15 Modeling spatial transmission of Ebola in West Africa. CORNELL UNIVERSITY 02/12/14 Avoidable errors in the modeling of outbreaks of emerging pathogens, with special reference to Ebola. GAZETTE DU LABORATOIRE 24/02/16 'Modélisation des épidémies', nouvel épisode de 'Ils font avancer la recherche' la série vidéo de l'Institut Pasteur et de Sup'Biotech. 2016-02-24 'Modélisation des épidémies', nouvel épisode de 'Ils font avancer la recherche' la série vidéo de l'Institut Pasteur et de Sup'Biotech.

GAZETTE DU LABORATOIRE 24/02/16 'Modélisation des épidémies', nouvel épisode de 'Ils font avancer la recherche' la série vidéo de l'Institut Pasteur et de Sup'Biotech.

Sup'Biotech, l'école supérieure spécialisée en biotechnologies de IONIS Education Group, présente en partenariat avec l'Institut Pasteur, le 5e épisode de la 6e saison de « Ils font avancer la recherche », consacrée aux chercheurs de l'Institut. Tous les mois, un nouvel épisode vidéo est proposé. Ces formats courts permettent aux chercheurs issus des différents laboratoires de l'Institut d'exposer de façon simple et accessible les sujets de leurs travaux. Pour Sup'Biotech, à l'initiative du projet, la production de cette série constitue une façon de soutenir l'Institut Pasteur, en créant avec lui de nouveaux outils de communication. La réalisation de ces vidéos permet également d'accroître la culture scientifique de ses étudiants, en les amenant à approfondir leurs recherches sur les sujets présentés. Géraldine Seuleusian IONIS Education Group. EcoHealth 4, 151–155, 2007 Modeling the Impact of Ebola and Bushmeat Hunting on Western Lowland Gorillas.

Human outbreaks beginning between October 2001 and December 2002, index patients were infected by gorilla or chimpanzee carcasses (Rouquet et al., 2005).

EcoHealth 4, 151–155, 2007 Modeling the Impact of Ebola and Bushmeat Hunting on Western Lowland Gorillas

Additionally, Ebola outbreaks occur in localized pockets containing a subset of the gorilla population, and other hunted species such as chimpanzees and duikers would also likely be in- fected. Higher. Agriculture have been advocated (Brashares et al., 2004). However, such efforts would also result in habitat destruc- tion. Providing alternatives to this subset would be more feasible. It is quite likely that as gorilla densities decline, so too will the harvest. PLOS 06/11/14 Modeling the Impact of Interventions on an Epidemic of Ebola in Sierra Leone and Liberia. Introduction West Africa is currently experiencing an unprecedented outbreak of Ebola, a viral hemorrhagic fever.

PLOS 06/11/14 Modeling the Impact of Interventions on an Epidemic of Ebola in Sierra Leone and Liberia

On March 23, 2014 the World Health Organization announced through the Global Alert and Response Network that an outbreak of Ebola virus disease in Guinea was unfolding1,2,3. Ebola is generally characterized by sporadic, primarily rural outbreaks, and has not been seen before in West Africa, or in an outbreak of this size. As of October 5, 2014, the World Health Organization has reported 8,033 cases of Ebola virus disease in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea, Nigeria and Senegal, with sporadic cases occurring outside West Africa4. Considerable attention has been focused on preventing the outbreak from spreading further, either within Africa or intercontinentally.

Methods Outbreak Data A time series of reported Ebola cases was collected from public data released by the World Health Organization, as well as the Ministries of Health of the afflicted countries. Modeled Interventions. UNIVERSITY OF MADRID 16/12/14 [Version 2] - Be-CoDiS: An epidemiological model to predict the risk of human diseases spread between countries. Validation and application to the 2014 Ebola Virus Disease epidemic. Research journali’s Journal of Mathematics - FEV 2015 - Mathematical Analysis Of Effects Of Isolation On Ebola Transmission Dynamics.

EUROSURVEILLANCE 18/09/14 Au sommaire: Authors' reply: Feedback from modelling to surveillance of Ebola virus disease. Citation style for this article: Nishiura H, Chowell G.

EUROSURVEILLANCE 18/09/14 Au sommaire: Authors' reply: Feedback from modelling to surveillance of Ebola virus disease

Authors' reply: Feedback from modelling to surveillance of Ebola virus disease. Euro Surveill. 2014;19(37):pii=20908. Available online: Date of submission: 18 September 2014 To the editor: We appreciate the comments from Plachouras et al. on our article published in Eurosurveillance a week ago [1,2]. Overall we fully agree with them on both points, i.e., (i) in that there is a need to account for the geographic heterogeneity of the ongoing Ebola epidemic to better understand the transmission dynamics and guide intervention strategies and (ii) in that caution must be exercised to interpret time-dependent changes in the reported coverage of cases captured by the surveillance systems. First, the most recent data points comprising the last three weeks of reported case counts (weeks 35-37) presented by Plachouras et al. were not incorporated in our analysis as these data were not available at the time of preparing our study.