background preloader

Maladies vectorielles en Europe

Facebook Twitter

EFSA CHANNEL via YOUTUBE 11/05/17 Mapping vector-borne diseases. EFSA - EFSA's vector-borne disease map journals. Parasites & Vectors December 2015, 8:88 A molecular survey of vector-borne pathogens in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Bosnia and Herzegovina. Vector-borne diseases (VBDs) are caused by many protozoan, helminthic, bacterial and viral pathogens, which are transmitted to animals and humans by blood-sucking arthropods, such as ticks, mosquitos, fleas and phlebotomine sand flies [1].

Parasites & Vectors December 2015, 8:88 A molecular survey of vector-borne pathogens in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Bosnia and Herzegovina

The majority of VBDs are classified as emerging infectious diseases and anthropogenic changes, such as global warming, deforestation, globalization and pollution, may have an impact on their prevalence and distribution [1,2]. However, despite intensive clinical and epidemiological research in the recent past, especially in domestic dogs and cats, the information on the occurrence and prevalence of vector-borne pathogens in wild canids is still scarce [3-7]. Tick-borne parasitic hematozoa of the genus Babesia (order Piroplasmida) infect erythrocytes of a wide range of domestic and wild animals [6,9,24].

In the past, it was assumed that only B. canis and B. gibsoni can cause diseases in dogs [9]. BIOMED BLOG NETWORK 16/12/16 Vector-Borne Diseases in the UK – Biennial Conference 2016. Vector-borne diseases in the UK Conference Poster, including sponsors The third meeting on ‘Vector-Borne Diseases in the UK’ was held at The Foresight Centre, University of Liverpool in November.

BIOMED BLOG NETWORK 16/12/16 Vector-Borne Diseases in the UK – Biennial Conference 2016

Held over a two-day period, the purpose of this biennial meeting is to bring together members of the major UK research groups who have an interest in vectors or vector-borne diseases which could be a threat to the UK, groups with wider but related areas of interest, members of key UK Government Departments and their Agencies, and representatives of European organisations with an interest in this topic. The conference was kindly funded by the Health Protection Research Unit which was established in April 2014 using funding from the UK Government’s National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), as well as BBSRC, DEFRA, Oxford Biosystems and the Society for General Microbiology, allowing for a reduction in conference fees for PhD student attendees.

Research Highlights: International Talks: UK Talks: Eurosurveillance, Volume 14, Issue 12, 26 March 2009 International network for capacity building for the control of emerging viral vector-borne zoonotic diseases: ARBO-ZOONET. Culicoïdes en Europe. Tiques en Europe. HPSC_IE - MARS 2016 - RANKING OF LIKELIHOOD OF EMERGENCE OF SELECTED VECTORBORNE DISEASES IN IRELAND. PARASITES & VECTORS 24/03/14 Bacterial and protozoal agents of feline vector-borne diseases in domestic and stray cats from southern Portugal. The present study represents the first survey on FVBD agents performed in cats from southern Portugal.

PARASITES & VECTORS 24/03/14 Bacterial and protozoal agents of feline vector-borne diseases in domestic and stray cats from southern Portugal.

The overall prevalence of Leishmania spp. infection in the present study (9.9%) was higher than the one obtained in domestic cats from the north and centre of the country (0.3%) [8], but lower than the prevalence obtained in domestic (20.3%) and stray (30.4%) cats from Lisbon [9,10], suggesting that the rate of Leishmania infection might be dynamic over time, depending on the abundance and distribution of proven vector species in conjunction with the number of infected vertebrate hosts.

The significant differences of Leishmania spp. prevalence between juvenile and adult or old cats corroborated the results obtained in cats from the north of the country [19] and match the situation previously found in a national serosurvey of Leishmania canine infection [20]. OMS 15/04/14 Experts review status of vector-borne diseases in Slovenia. An expert meeting on vector-borne diseases organized on 7 April 2014 in Ljubljana drew national attention to the theme of this year’s World Health Day.

OMS 15/04/14 Experts review status of vector-borne diseases in Slovenia

The meeting was attended by over 100 professionals, mostly from the health sector, who listened to lectures by national experts on topics such as the global and national burden of these diseases, blood safety and the protection of travellers. The event was organized by the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Slovenia, the National Institute for Public Health and the WHO Country Office in Slovenia. Vector-borne diseases are less prevalent in Europe than in other WHO regions; however, Maja Sočan from the National Institute of Public Health explained that climate change can alter the patterns of some diseases that are now considered exotic. EFSA 10/06/14 EFSA and ECDC join forces to fight vector-borne diseases. The project will provide data on the presence, distribution and abundance of vectors and vector-borne diseases, which EFSA and ECDC will then use in their risk assessments.

EFSA 10/06/14 EFSA and ECDC join forces to fight vector-borne diseases

A new video, featuring interviews with Franck Berthe, Head of EFSA’s Animal and Plant Health unit, and Hervé Zeller, Head of the Emerging and Vector-borne Diseases Programme at ECDC, presents the work that the two organisations do together in this field. Vectors are living organisms – such as mosquitoes, ticks, flies or fleas – that transmit a disease from an infected animal to a human or another animal. EFSA via YOUTUBE 06/06/14 Combatting vector-borne diseases in Europe. Vector-Borne Diseases in the UK – Biennial Conference 2014 - BugBitten. Victor Brugman (The Pirbright Institute) and Stacey Leech (Public Health England) This month saw a swarm of parasitologists, entomologists, virologists and ecologists descend on the University of Liverpool for the second conference on ‘Vector-Borne diseases (VBD) in the UK’.

Vector-Borne Diseases in the UK – Biennial Conference 2014 - BugBitten

Recent years have seen vector-borne diseases in Europe increase in range and disseminate into new environments. New viruses such as Bluetongue and Schmallenberg have emerged,two human cases of the important tick-borne disease Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) were imported into the UK in the last two years and the natural tick vector species Hyalomma marginatum, came into the UK via migratory birds. EUROSURVEILLANCE 30/07/15 Au sommaire: Louse-borne relapsing fever (Borrelia recurrentis) in asylum seekers from Eritrea, the Netherlands, July 2015. Weekly and monthly releases: Eurosurveillance releases: A rapid communication pointing out the possibility of louse-borne relapsing fever occurring in crowded conditions such as in reception areas for refugees Eurosurveillance, Volume 20, Issue 30, 30 July 2015 Table of Contents Rapid communications by KR Wilting, Y Stienstra, B Sinha, M Braks, D Cornish, H Grundmann.

EUROSURVEILLANCE 30/07/15 Au sommaire: Louse-borne relapsing fever (Borrelia recurrentis) in asylum seekers from Eritrea, the Netherlands, July 2015

THE LANCET 23/03/15 Effect of climate change on vector-borne disease risk in the UK. Vector-Borne Diseases in the UK – Biennial Conference 2014 - Bugbitten.

Maladies vectorielles en France

ECDC - NOV 2014 - Annual epidemiological report Emerging and vector-borne diseases 2014. - Site EDENext. EUROPEAN SOCIETY FOR VECTOR ECOLOGY - OCT 2012 - Dossier de presse en français. Parasit Vectors. JANUARY 2010; 3: 2. Canine and feline vector-borne diseases in Italy: current situation and perspectives. Parasites & Vectors 2013, 6:16 Vector-borne helminths of dogs and humans in Europe. WATER AND ADAPTATION-INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP, Amsterdam July 1-2, 2008 Présentation : Managing the risk of vector borne diseases.

WAGENINGEN ACADEMIC - 2007 - Emerging pests and vector-borne diseases in Europe. VETERINARY ITALIA 2009 - Volume 45 (1), January-MarchZoonoses and vector-borne diseases in Croatia - a multidisciplinary approac. PATHEXO - Presentation : Aedes albopictus in Italy (1990-2007) - Updating on its distribution and seasonal behavioural changes. GRIDA - Climate change and vector-borne diseases. EUROSURVEILLANCE 11/03/10 A perspective on emerging mosquito and phlebotomine-borne diseases in Europe. Citation style for this article: Hendrickx G, Lancelot R.

EUROSURVEILLANCE 11/03/10 A perspective on emerging mosquito and phlebotomine-borne diseases in Europe

EDEN - JUIN 2010 - Actes du colloque - 10-11-12th May 2010 Emerging Vector-borne Diseases in a Changing European Environment. CIRAD 08/01/09 A propos de ces maladies vectorielles qui émergent en Europe : 4ème réunion annuelle du Projet EDEN. Intégré au 6e PCRDT (Programme cadre de recherche et du développement technologique) de la Commission européenne, le projet Eden démarrait en 2004 sur une initiative du Cirad, de l'Ird et de l'Institut Pasteur de Paris pour une durée de cinq ans.

CIRAD 08/01/09 A propos de ces maladies vectorielles qui émergent en Europe : 4ème réunion annuelle du Projet EDEN

Il réunit 49 institutions partenaires dans 24 pays pour la plupart européens. «Le défi scientifique d’Eden était d’intégrer l’approche de spécialistes de la biologie et de l’écologie des vecteurs et des maladies à celle d’équipes de modélisation, afin de comprendre l’effet des changements environnementaux sur la transmission des maladies, et d’en prévoir les conséquences. Nous sommes en passe de réussir, et nos résultats intéressent beaucoup les agences de santé publique » explique Renaud Lancelot, coordinateur du projet et chercheur au Cirad *. Comprendre et modéliser les mécanismes d’émergence de ces maladies sans frontière. PARLEMENT EUROPEEN - Réponse à question E-5443/08 Les maladies vectorielles et le changement climatique. Les rapports les plus récents de l'Organisation mondiale de la santé(1) et le Centre européen pour la prévention et le contrôle des maladies(2) mettent en garde contre les effets du changement climatique sur les maladies vectorielles.

PARLEMENT EUROPEEN - Réponse à question E-5443/08 Les maladies vectorielles et le changement climatique

Selon le rapport de l'ECDC, les modifications affectant le climat et les écosystèmes pourraient se répercuter sur le risque posé par les maladies vectorielles. Avec les changements observés dans les mouvements migratoires des insectes et des oiseaux à l'échelle mondiale et régionale, nous savons déjà que les écosystèmes sont touchés par le changement climatique. Les maladies vectorielles sont également très sensibles aux variations de températures et d'humidité. L'été dernier, nous avons déjà assisté à une manifestation de ce phénomène avec l'apparition de la fièvre Chikungunya en Italie. 1. 2. 3. 4. Arbovirus en Europe.