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Maladies vectorielles en Europe

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EFSA 15/05/20 VectorNet's First Annual Entomological Network Meeting. FRONT. VET. SCI. 23/01/20 Molecular Survey on Vector-Borne Pathogens in Alpine Wild Carnivorans. Introduction More than 70% of zoonotic emerging infectious diseases are caused by pathogens with a wildlife origin, and their impact on human health is increasing (1).

FRONT. VET. SCI. 23/01/20 Molecular Survey on Vector-Borne Pathogens in Alpine Wild Carnivorans

In particular, the increased interactions between humans, domestic animals and wildlife, resulting from human population growth, increase of peri-urban sylvatic animals and habitat fragmentation, have been proposed as a leading cause of pathogen emergence (2). Carnivorans are well-adapted to urban and peri-urban environments, and among the most important sources of zoonotic pathogens such as rabies (3, 4). In Europe, sylvatic carnivorans as the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and the European badger (Meles meles) are widely distributed across the continent, with stable or growing populations in urban and suburban areas (5).

Furthermore, in recent years we assisted to the recovery of large carnivores in Europe such as the wolf (Canis lupus), which has shown to adapt well to human-dominated landscape (6). ENVA/CIRAD/UNIVERSITE PARIS 11/UNIVERSITE PARIS 12 01/07/10 Rapport de stage : Maladie vectorielles émergentes dans le sud de l’Europe: Cartographie des risques et des compétences. Campion Cécilia. 2010.

ENVA/CIRAD/UNIVERSITE PARIS 11/UNIVERSITE PARIS 12 01/07/10 Rapport de stage : Maladie vectorielles émergentes dans le sud de l’Europe: Cartographie des risques et des compétences

Maladie vectorielles émergentes dans le sud de l'Europe : Cartographie des risques et des compétences. FRONT. VET. SCI. 10/01/20 Emerging Threats to Animals in the United Kingdom by Arthropod-Borne Diseases. 1Animal and Plant Health Agency (United Kingdom), United Kingdom Worldwide, arthropod-borne disease transmission represents one of the greatest threats to public and animal health.

FRONT. VET. SCI. 10/01/20 Emerging Threats to Animals in the United Kingdom by Arthropod-Borne Diseases

For the British Isles, an island group on the north-western coast of continental Europe consisting of the United Kingdom (UK) and the Republic of Ireland, physical separation offers a barrier to the introduction of many of the pathogens that affect animals on the rest of the continent. Added to this are strict biosecurity rules at ports of entry and the depauperate vector biodiversity found on the islands. Nevertheless, there are some indigenous arthropod-borne pathogens that cause sporadic outbreaks such as the tick-borne louping ill virus, found almost exclusively in the British Isles, and a range of piroplasmid infections that are poorly characterised.

These provide an ongoing source of infection whose emergence can be unpredictable. Received: 24 Sep 2019; Accepted: 10 Jan 2020. * Correspondence: Dr.

Maladies vectorielles en Italie

PLOS 13/06/19 Towards harmonisation of entomological surveillance in the Mediterranean area. Abstract Background The Mediterranean Basin is historically a hotspot for trade, transport, and migration.

PLOS 13/06/19 Towards harmonisation of entomological surveillance in the Mediterranean area

As a result, countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea share common public health threats. Among them are vector-borne diseases, and in particular, mosquito-borne viral diseases are prime candidates as (re)emerging diseases and are likely to spread across the area. Improving preparedness and response capacities to these threats at the regional level is therefore a major issue. The implementation of entomological surveillance is, in particular, of utmost importance. The purpose of the proposed review is to draw up guidelines for designing effective and sustainable entomological surveillance systems in order to improve preparedness and response. Such guidance is aimed at policymakers and diverse stakeholders and is intended to be used as a framework for the implementation of entomological surveillance programmes. Methods Findings Published: June 13, 2019 Introduction Methodology Fig 1. Changement climatique et maladies vectorielles en Europe.

PARASITES & VECTORS 11/01/19 Retrospective evaluation of vector-borne infections in dogs imported from the Mediterranean region and southeastern Europe (2007–2015) In 35% of 345 imported dogs tested for vector-borne infections, at least one pathogen was detected.

PARASITES & VECTORS 11/01/19 Retrospective evaluation of vector-borne infections in dogs imported from the Mediterranean region and southeastern Europe (2007–2015)

The most common pathogen was L. infantum with 21% of tested dogs being positive, followed by E. canis with 16%. Eleven percent of dogs were positive for H. canis and 10% for Babesia spp. Anaplasma platys was detected in 5% of tested dogs. Eight percent of dogs were positive for multiple pathogens. Only dogs originating from the Mediterranean region had positive test results for more than one pathogen, especially E. canis and Babesia spp. In total, 25 dogs were infected with Babesia spp. in our study. For B. gibsoni, vertical infections [36], as well as infections via bite wounds, saliva and blood contact [37, 38, 39], have to be considered as a transmission route, especially in non-endemic regions for specific vectors [40]. Regarding L. infantum, individual cases of infections transmitted via mating [41, 42], transplacental [43, 44, 45, 46] and bite wounds [47] have been described. EFSA 12/11/18 The importance of vector abundance and seasonality.

This joint ECDC‐EFSA report assesses whether vector count data (abundance) and the way these change throughout the year (seasonality) can provide useful information about vector‐borne diseases epidemiological processes of interest, and therefore, whether resources should be devoted to collecting such data.

EFSA 12/11/18 The importance of vector abundance and seasonality

The document also summarises what measures of abundance and seasonality can be collected for each vector group (mosquitoes, sandflies, midges and ticks), lists the gaps in the sampling coverage and provides guidance for prioritising the acquisition of information. Knowing where vector species occur is crucial for the assessment of vector‐borne disease risk. Collecting abundance and seasonality data through field sampling is, however, more expensive and time consuming than collecting most other vector‐related data. The importance of abundance and seasonality data varies considerably according to the vector group and the epidemiological concept of interest.

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, Assessment of the Public Health Threats Posed by Vector-Borne Disease in the United Kingdom (UK) IAEA 30/05/18 Detecting Vector Borne Disease: IAEA and FAO Help Enhance Capacity in Europe. Mosquitoes, ticks, flies, lice, aquatic snails have a particular feature in common ­ they can transmit disease to animals and humans.

IAEA 30/05/18 Detecting Vector Borne Disease: IAEA and FAO Help Enhance Capacity in Europe

These diseases are called ‘vector-borne’ as their transmission occurs via a vector (a mosquito, tick, etc.) that carries and transmits the infectious pathogen into another living organism. Early detection is key to preventing disease outbreaks, and the IAEA and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) recently held a meeting to enhance European countries’ capacity in this regard. Twenty-one specialists working in the field of veterinary diagnostics have met in Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, at a meeting organised collaboratively by the IAEA, FAO and Georgia’s National Food Agency of the Ministry of Environmental Protection and Agriculture. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), vector borne diseases account for more than 17% of all infectious diseases, causing more than 700 000 deaths annually.

EUROPA_EU - MARS 2018 - Toward climate change impact - Vectors carrying viral infection : what we should know - Study. EFSA CHANNEL via YOUTUBE 11/05/17 Mapping vector-borne diseases. EFSA - EFSA's vector-borne disease map journals. Parasites & Vectors December 2015, 8:88 A molecular survey of vector-borne pathogens in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Vector-borne diseases (VBDs) are caused by many protozoan, helminthic, bacterial and viral pathogens, which are transmitted to animals and humans by blood-sucking arthropods, such as ticks, mosquitos, fleas and phlebotomine sand flies [1].

Parasites & Vectors December 2015, 8:88 A molecular survey of vector-borne pathogens in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Bosnia and Herzegovina

The majority of VBDs are classified as emerging infectious diseases and anthropogenic changes, such as global warming, deforestation, globalization and pollution, may have an impact on their prevalence and distribution [1,2]. However, despite intensive clinical and epidemiological research in the recent past, especially in domestic dogs and cats, the information on the occurrence and prevalence of vector-borne pathogens in wild canids is still scarce [3-7]. Tick-borne parasitic hematozoa of the genus Babesia (order Piroplasmida) infect erythrocytes of a wide range of domestic and wild animals [6,9,24]. In the past, it was assumed that only B. canis and B. gibsoni can cause diseases in dogs [9]. BIOMED BLOG NETWORK 16/12/16 Vector-Borne Diseases in the UK – Biennial Conference 2016. Vector-borne diseases in the UK Conference Poster, including sponsors The third meeting on ‘Vector-Borne Diseases in the UK’ was held at The Foresight Centre, University of Liverpool in November.

BIOMED BLOG NETWORK 16/12/16 Vector-Borne Diseases in the UK – Biennial Conference 2016

Held over a two-day period, the purpose of this biennial meeting is to bring together members of the major UK research groups who have an interest in vectors or vector-borne diseases which could be a threat to the UK, groups with wider but related areas of interest, members of key UK Government Departments and their Agencies, and representatives of European organisations with an interest in this topic. The conference was kindly funded by the Health Protection Research Unit which was established in April 2014 using funding from the UK Government’s National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), as well as BBSRC, DEFRA, Oxford Biosystems and the Society for General Microbiology, allowing for a reduction in conference fees for PhD student attendees.

Research Highlights: Eurosurveillance, Volume 14, Issue 12, 26 March 2009 International network for capacity building for the control of emerging viral vector-borne zoonotic diseases: ARBO-ZOONET. Culicoïdes en Europe. Tiques en Europe. HPSC_IE - MARS 2016 - RANKING OF LIKELIHOOD OF EMERGENCE OF SELECTED VECTORBORNE DISEASES IN IRELAND. PARASITES & VECTORS 24/03/14 Bacterial and protozoal agents of feline vector-borne diseases in domestic and stray cats from southern Portugal.

The present study represents the first survey on FVBD agents performed in cats from southern Portugal.

PARASITES & VECTORS 24/03/14 Bacterial and protozoal agents of feline vector-borne diseases in domestic and stray cats from southern Portugal.

The overall prevalence of Leishmania spp. infection in the present study (9.9%) was higher than the one obtained in domestic cats from the north and centre of the country (0.3%) [8], but lower than the prevalence obtained in domestic (20.3%) and stray (30.4%) cats from Lisbon [9,10], suggesting that the rate of Leishmania infection might be dynamic over time, depending on the abundance and distribution of proven vector species in conjunction with the number of infected vertebrate hosts. The significant differences of Leishmania spp. prevalence between juvenile and adult or old cats corroborated the results obtained in cats from the north of the country [19] and match the situation previously found in a national serosurvey of Leishmania canine infection [20]. OMS 15/04/14 Experts review status of vector-borne diseases in Slovenia.

An expert meeting on vector-borne diseases organized on 7 April 2014 in Ljubljana drew national attention to the theme of this year’s World Health Day. The meeting was attended by over 100 professionals, mostly from the health sector, who listened to lectures by national experts on topics such as the global and national burden of these diseases, blood safety and the protection of travellers. The event was organized by the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Slovenia, the National Institute for Public Health and the WHO Country Office in Slovenia.

Vector-borne diseases are less prevalent in Europe than in other WHO regions; however, Maja Sočan from the National Institute of Public Health explained that climate change can alter the patterns of some diseases that are now considered exotic. Incidence and response in Slovenia The most common vector -borne diseases in Slovenia are encephalitis and Lyme disease, both transmitted by ticks. Emerging threats. EFSA 10/06/14 EFSA and ECDC join forces to fight vector-borne diseases. The project will provide data on the presence, distribution and abundance of vectors and vector-borne diseases, which EFSA and ECDC will then use in their risk assessments. A new video, featuring interviews with Franck Berthe, Head of EFSA’s Animal and Plant Health unit, and Hervé Zeller, Head of the Emerging and Vector-borne Diseases Programme at ECDC, presents the work that the two organisations do together in this field.

Vectors are living organisms – such as mosquitoes, ticks, flies or fleas – that transmit a disease from an infected animal to a human or another animal. Many of the diseases that they transmit are considered emerging infectious diseases: diseases that appear for the first time, or that may have existed previously but are rapidly increasing in incidence or geographic range.

EFSA via YOUTUBE 06/06/14 Combatting vector-borne diseases in Europe. Vector-Borne Diseases in the UK – Biennial Conference 2014 - BugBitten. Victor Brugman (The Pirbright Institute) and Stacey Leech (Public Health England) This month saw a swarm of parasitologists, entomologists, virologists and ecologists descend on the University of Liverpool for the second conference on ‘Vector-Borne diseases (VBD) in the UK’. Recent years have seen vector-borne diseases in Europe increase in range and disseminate into new environments. New viruses such as Bluetongue and Schmallenberg have emerged,two human cases of the important tick-borne disease Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) were imported into the UK in the last two years and the natural tick vector species Hyalomma marginatum, came into the UK via migratory birds. Due to the recent changes in legislation no longer requiring animals to be tick treated when entering the country via the PETS travel scheme, ever-increasing human and animal movements and climate change effects, the UK may be at heightened risk of vector-borne disease incursion.

EUROSURVEILLANCE 30/07/15 Au sommaire: Louse-borne relapsing fever (Borrelia recurrentis) in asylum seekers from Eritrea, the Netherlands, July 2015. Weekly and monthly releases: Eurosurveillance releases: A rapid communication pointing out the possibility of louse-borne relapsing fever occurring in crowded conditions such as in reception areas for refugees Eurosurveillance, Volume 20, Issue 30, 30 July 2015 Table of Contents Rapid communications by KR Wilting, Y Stienstra, B Sinha, M Braks, D Cornish, H Grundmann.

THE LANCET 23/03/15 Effect of climate change on vector-borne disease risk in the UK. Vector-Borne Diseases in the UK – Biennial Conference 2014 - Bugbitten.

Maladies vectorielles en France

ECDC - NOV 2014 - Annual epidemiological report Emerging and vector-borne diseases 2014. - Site EDENext. EUROPEAN SOCIETY FOR VECTOR ECOLOGY - OCT 2012 - Dossier de presse en français. Parasit Vectors. JANUARY 2010; 3: 2. Canine and feline vector-borne diseases in Italy: current situation and perspectives. Parasites & Vectors 2013, 6:16 Vector-borne helminths of dogs and humans in Europe.

WATER AND ADAPTATION-INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP, Amsterdam July 1-2, 2008 Présentation : Managing the risk of vector borne diseases. WAGENINGEN ACADEMIC - 2007 - Emerging pests and vector-borne diseases in Europe. VETERINARY ITALIA 2009 - Volume 45 (1), January-MarchZoonoses and vector-borne diseases in Croatia - a multidisciplinary approac. PATHEXO - Presentation : Aedes albopictus in Italy (1990-2007) - Updating on its distribution and seasonal behavioural changes.

GRIDA - Climate change and vector-borne diseases. EUROSURVEILLANCE 11/03/10 A perspective on emerging mosquito and phlebotomine-borne diseases in Europe. Citation style for this article: Hendrickx G, Lancelot R. A perspective on emerging mosquito and phlebotomine-borne diseases in Europe. Euro Surveill. 2010;15(10):pii=19503. Available online: Date of submission: 11 March 2010. EDEN - JUIN 2010 - Actes du colloque - 10-11-12th May 2010 Emerging Vector-borne Diseases in a Changing European Environment. CIRAD 08/01/09 A propos de ces maladies vectorielles qui émergent en Europe : 4ème réunion annuelle du Projet EDEN. Intégré au 6e PCRDT (Programme cadre de recherche et du développement technologique) de la Commission européenne, le projet Eden démarrait en 2004 sur une initiative du Cirad, de l'Ird et de l'Institut Pasteur de Paris pour une durée de cinq ans. Il réunit 49 institutions partenaires dans 24 pays pour la plupart européens.

«Le défi scientifique d’Eden était d’intégrer l’approche de spécialistes de la biologie et de l’écologie des vecteurs et des maladies à celle d’équipes de modélisation, afin de comprendre l’effet des changements environnementaux sur la transmission des maladies, et d’en prévoir les conséquences. Nous sommes en passe de réussir, et nos résultats intéressent beaucoup les agences de santé publique » explique Renaud Lancelot, coordinateur du projet et chercheur au Cirad *. Comprendre et modéliser les mécanismes d’émergence de ces maladies sans frontière - l’encéphalite à tiques , fréquente en Europe centrale et du Nord; La réunion de Marrakech. PARLEMENT EUROPEEN - Réponse à question E-5443/08 Les maladies vectorielles et le changement climatique.

Les rapports les plus récents de l'Organisation mondiale de la santé(1) et le Centre européen pour la prévention et le contrôle des maladies(2) mettent en garde contre les effets du changement climatique sur les maladies vectorielles. Selon le rapport de l'ECDC, les modifications affectant le climat et les écosystèmes pourraient se répercuter sur le risque posé par les maladies vectorielles. Avec les changements observés dans les mouvements migratoires des insectes et des oiseaux à l'échelle mondiale et régionale, nous savons déjà que les écosystèmes sont touchés par le changement climatique.

Les maladies vectorielles sont également très sensibles aux variations de températures et d'humidité. L'été dernier, nous avons déjà assisté à une manifestation de ce phénomène avec l'apparition de la fièvre Chikungunya en Italie. 1. 2. 3. 4. Arbovirus en Europe.