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MICROORGANISMS 03/06/21 Legionella and Biofilms—Integrated Surveillance to Bridge Science and Real-Field Demands. Legionella is responsible for the life-threatening pneumonia commonly known as Legionnaires’ disease or legionellosis.

MICROORGANISMS 03/06/21 Legionella and Biofilms—Integrated Surveillance to Bridge Science and Real-Field Demands

Legionellosis is known to be preventable if proper measures are put into practice. Despite the efforts to improve preventive approaches, Legionella control remains one of the most challenging issues in the water treatment industry. Legionellosis incidence is on the rise and is expected to keep increasing as global challenges become a reality. This puts great emphasis on prevention, which must be grounded in strengthened Legionella management practices. Herein, an overview of field-based studies (the system as a test rig) is provided to unravel the common roots of research and the main contributions to Legionella’s understanding. ►▼ Show Figures. MICROORGANISMS 22/09/20 Chlorine Disinfection of Legionella spp., L. pneumophila, and Acanthamoeba under Warm Water Premise Plumbing Conditions.

Premise plumbing conditions can contribute to low chlorine or chloramine disinfectant residuals and reactions that encourage opportunistic pathogen growth and create risk of Legionnaires’ Disease outbreaks.

MICROORGANISMS 22/09/20 Chlorine Disinfection of Legionella spp., L. pneumophila, and Acanthamoeba under Warm Water Premise Plumbing Conditions

This bench-scale study investigated the growth of Legionella spp. and Acanthamoeba in direct contact with premise plumbing materials—glass-only control, cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) pipe, magnesium anode rods, iron pipe, iron oxide, pH 10, or a combination of factors. Simulated glass water heaters (SGWHs) were colonized by Legionella pneumophila and exposed to a sequence of 0, 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 mg/L chlorine or chloramine, at two levels of total organic carbon (TOC), over 8 weeks.

Legionella pneumophila thrived in the presence of the magnesium anode by itself and or combination with other factors. ►▼ Show Figures Figure 1. HSE_GOV_UK - 2020 - Legionella risks during the coronavirus pandemic. REVUE DE MEDECINE GENERALE - NOV 2010 - Suites d’une déclaration internationale de legionella. WEBINAIRES disponibles. Airelimpio airelimpio via YOUTUBE 18/12/17 Webinar Norma UNE 100030:2017 de Legionella - Parte 1.

ANSES - 2013 - La formation de biofilms de Legionella pneumophila : Rôle du di-P cyclique dans le contrôle de la formation de biofilms de Legionella pneumophila. Biofouling - SEPT 2016 - New insights into Legionella pneumophila biofilm regulation by c-di-GMP signaling. Braz. J. Microbiol. vol.49 no.1 São Paulo Jan./Mar. 2018 An investigation of virulence factors of Legionella pneumophila environmental isolates. References.

Braz. J. Microbiol. vol.49 no.1 São Paulo Jan./Mar. 2018 An investigation of virulence factors of Legionella pneumophila environmental isolates

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 598 Legionella spp. Risk Assessment in Recreational and Garden Areas of Hotels. Several Travel-associated Legionnaires’ disease (TALD) cases occur annually in Europe.

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 598 Legionella spp. Risk Assessment in Recreational and Garden Areas of Hotels

Except from the most obvious sites (cooling towers and hot water systems), infections can also be associated with recreational, water feature, and garden areas of hotels. This argument is of great interest to better comprehend the colonization and to calculate the risk to human health of these sites. From July 2000–November 2017, the public health authorities of the Island of Crete (Greece) inspected 119 hotels associated with TALD, as reported through the European Legionnaires’ Disease Surveillance Network. Front. Cell. Infect. Microbiol., 04/04/18 Differences in Virulence Between Legionella pneumophila Isolates From Human and Non-human Sources Determined in Galleria mellonella Infection Model. Introduction Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular Gram-negative bacterium ubiquitous in both freshwater environments and in many man-made water systems known for its ability to cause disease in humans (Fields, 2008; Newton et al., 2010; Cunha et al., 2016).

Front. Cell. Infect. Microbiol., 04/04/18 Differences in Virulence Between Legionella pneumophila Isolates From Human and Non-human Sources Determined in Galleria mellonella Infection Model

Eukaryotic phagocytes feed on L. pneumophila, so the bacterium's survival and spread relies on the capability to take over the predator cellular mechanism (Fields, 2008; Declerck, 2010; Abdelhady and Garduño, 2013; Richards et al., 2013). Indeed, the machinery underlying Legionella virulence is the outcome of a significant selective pressure resulting in a survival mechanism of trained resilience to protozoa phagocytosis (Moliner et al., 2010; Allombert et al., 2013; Richards et al., 2013; Boamah et al., 2017; Oliva et al., 2018).

ANNALS OF AGRICULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE - 2008 - MONITORING LEGIONELLA SPECIES IN HOSPITAL WATER SYSTEMS. LINK WITH DISEASE AND EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT DETECTION METHODS. More detailsHide details Ann Agric Environ Med 2008;15(1) The aim of this work was to evaluate three currently available isolation methods for Legionella using water samples and swabs of a single pediatric hospital water system.

ANNALS OF AGRICULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE - 2008 - MONITORING LEGIONELLA SPECIES IN HOSPITAL WATER SYSTEMS. LINK WITH DISEASE AND EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT DETECTION METHODS

Additionally, high risk patients were screened for the presence of Legionella pneumophila antigen in urine. Fifteen water samples and 11 swab samples were collected from distal sites at 18 sampling locations. Ann Agric Environ Med 2016;23(3):452–455 Environmental factors affecting the survival of soil dwelling Legionella longbeachae in water. Environmental factors affecting the survival of soil dwelling Legionella longbeachae in water Introduction:Legionella longbeachae, a causative agent of Legionnaire’s disease, has often been associated with potting soil and gardening, a feature quite distinct from other Legionella species.

Ann Agric Environ Med 2016;23(3):452–455 Environmental factors affecting the survival of soil dwelling Legionella longbeachae in water

The precise transmission mechanism is still unknown, although due to the ecological coherence of the soil and water there is a potential risk of infection by contaminated stagnant water in the garden. Objective:The aim of the study was to explore the ability of L. longbeachae to survive in stagnant tap water usually used for watering in gardens. The influence of different factors (temperature, pH and NaCl concentration) on L. longbeachae survival in stagnant tap water was also tested. Results:The result showed that L. longbeachae is viable in stagnant tap water over 100 days at 4°C and 25°C.

Ann Agric Environ Med 2017;24(2):276–282 Legionella risk assessment in cruise ships and ferries. Introduction:The increasing development of marine traffic has led to a rise in the incidence of legionellosis among travellers.

Ann Agric Environ Med 2017;24(2):276–282 Legionella risk assessment in cruise ships and ferries

It occurs in similar environments, especially closed and crowded, and aboard ships Legionella survives and multiplies easily in water pipes, spreading into the environment through air conditioning systems and water distribution points. Although in recent years in the construction of cruise ships preventive measures aimed at curbing the proliferation of Legionella (design, materials, focus on the operation and maintenance of the water system), have been taken account, little or no attention has been paid to small ships which, in many cases, are old and not well maintained. Objective:The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency and severity of Legionella contamination in ferries and cruise ships in order to adopt more specific control measures.

CDC EID - Volume 23, Number 11—November 2017. Au sommaire notamment: Street Cleaning Trucks as Potential Sources of Legionella pneumophila. Author affiliations: Agència de Salut Pública de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain (N.

CDC EID - Volume 23, Number 11—November 2017. Au sommaire notamment: Street Cleaning Trucks as Potential Sources of Legionella pneumophila

Valero, M. de Simón, P. Gallés, N. Izquierdo, J. Arimon, R. González, S. Highlight and copy the desired format. Abstract In 2015, Legionnaires’ disease was diagnosed in a street cleaning worker. PHYSORG 20/10/16 Clemson students name novel Legionella strain: Clemsonensis. The Clemson family has gained a new namesake: Legionella clemsonensis, a novel strain of the Legionella bacteria, the most common cause of waterborne bacterial outbreaks in the United States.

PHYSORG 20/10/16 Clemson students name novel Legionella strain: Clemsonensis

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) gave the honor of naming L. clemsonensis to students in a collaborative research group called CU and the CDC, which includes students from Clemson's Creative Inquiry (CI) program for undergraduate students and officials in the CDC Legionella lab. The newly named strain of Legionella was part of a batch of 68 strains the CDC sent to Clemson students to analyze. CDC EID - FEV 2017 - Au sommaire notamment: Outbreak of Legionnaire’s Disease Caused by Legionella pneumophila Serogroups 1 and 13.

Toshiro Kuroki1 ( , Junko Amemura-Maekawa1, Hitomi Ohya, Ichiro Furukawa, Miyuki Suzuki, Tomoka Masaoka, Kastuhiro Aikawa, Kazumi Hibi, Masatomo Morita, Ken-ichi Lee, Makoto Ohnishi, and Fumiaki Kura Author affiliations: Kanagawa Prefectural Institute of Public Health, Kanagawa, Japan (T. Kuroki, H. Ohya, I. Furukawa, M. Highlight and copy the desired format. Abstract In Japan, hot springs and public baths are the major sources of legionellosis. PASTEUR 01/02/16 Comment la bactérie responsable de la légionellose détourne-t-elle la machinerie cellulaire à son avantage ? La légionellose a touché plus de 1300 personnes en France en 2014 et provoqué près de 130 décès. Elle sévit notamment depuis 2014 aux Etats-Unis à Flint (Michigan) où elle a été diagnostiquée chez 87 personnes, ou encore au Portugal où plus de 300 personnes ont été infectées, dont sept sont décédées.

Cette maladie émergente est causée par Legionella pneumophila, bactérie environnementale qui se développe dans les circuits d’eau chaude. Legionella pneumophila est une bactérie intracellulaire, qui met en place un système sophistiqué d’attaque. Lors de l’analyse de son génome, l’équipe de Carmen Buchrieser, chef de l’unité de Biologie des bactéries intracellulaires (Institut Pasteur / CNRS), a identifié des gènes codant des protéines pouvant participer à l’infection de cellules humaines : celles-ci ressemblent à des protéines d’organismes supérieurs (eucaryotes), tels que l’Homme, et peuvent modifier la physiologie des cellules hôtes. Paris, 1er février 2016 Source. Eurosurveillance, Volume 17, Issue 49, 06 December 2012 The application of geographic information systems and spatial data during Legionnaires’ disease outbreak responses.

A literature review was conducted to highlight the application and potential benefit of using geographic information systems (GIS) during Legionnaires’ disease outbreak investigations. Relatively few published sources were identified, however, certain types of data were found to be important in facilitating the use of GIS, namely: patient data, locations of potential sources (e.g. cooling towers), demographic data relating to the local population and meteorological data. These data were then analysed to gain a better understanding of the spatial relationships between cases and their environment, the cases’ proximity to potential outbreak sources, and the modelled dispersion of contaminated aerosols.

The use of GIS in an outbreak is not a replacement for traditional outbreak investigation techniques, but it can be a valuable supplement to a response. Background. CDC EID - Volume 21, Number 6—June 2015 - au sommaire notamment: Reducing the Risk for Waterborne Nosocomial Neonatal Legionellosis. Suggested citation for this article To the Editor: I read with interest the report by Wei et al. (1) regarding 2 cases of neonatal legionellosis associated with infant formula prepared with hospital tap water. Two hospitals were involved, and water samples from both were positive for Legionella pneumophila bacteria that had molecular profiles indistinguishable from those for bacteria from the infected neonates.

OMS - Légionellose - Aide-mémoire N° 285 - Novembre 2014. CDC EID - Volume 21, Number 6—June 2015 - Reducing the Risk for Waterborne Nosocomial Neonatal Legionellosis. RIVM 29/10/12 Effectiveness of control measures for Legionella in water supply systems (rapport complet uniquement disponible en. CSTB - JANV 2012 - Maîtrise du risque de développement des légionelles dans les réseaux d’eau chaude sanitaire. WIKIPEDIA anglophone - fiche legionellosis. Legionnaires' disease (also Legionellosis or Legion Fever) is a form of pneumonia caused by any species of gram negative aerobic bacteria belonging to the genus Legionella.[1] Over 90% of cases of Legionnaires' disease are caused by the bacterium Legionella pneumophila. Other causative species include Legionella longbeachae, Legionella feeleii, Legionella micdadei and Legionella anisa.

These species cause a less severe infection known as Pontiac fever, which resembles acute influenza. These species can be water-borne or present in soil, whereas L. pneumophila has only been found in aquatic systems, where it is symbiotically present in aquatic-borne amoebae.[2] It thrives in temperatures between 25°C and 45°C (77°F and 113°F), with an optimum temperature of 35°C (95°F). During infection, the bacterium invades macrophages and lung epithelial cells and replicates intracellularly.[3][4] Transmission[edit] Epidemiology[edit] Reservoirs[edit] Signs and symptoms[edit] Diagnosis[edit] Treatment[edit]

Fiche legionelle. Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. Légionelles. WIKIPEDIA - fiche legionellose. Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. La légionellose est une maladie infectieuse due à une bactérie d'origine hydro-tellurique de la famille des Legionellaceae (Brenner et al. 1979) dont la plus connue est Legionella pneumophila. La bactérie se développe dans les réseaux d'eau douce naturels ou artificiels et dans un milieu organique favorable à leur développement (stations thermales, climatiseurs[note 1], etc.) riche en fer, zinc, aluminium. Également connue sous le nom de « maladie du légionnaire », elle est à déclaration obligatoire en France, en Belgique et au Canada[1].

Son incidence en France est de 1 540 cas en 2010 selon l'institut de veille sanitaire[2], en augmentation de 71 % sur les chiffres de 2009. Agent causal[modifier | modifier le code]