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FOOD POLICY INSTITUTE 14/04/09 Consumer responses to food recalls: 2008 national survey report.

Références CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE

EMERGING PATHOGENS INSTITUTE - KEEPING AMERICA’S FOOD SUPPLY SAFEResearchers identify top pathogen-food combinations that cause. Glossary of Terms. The definitions are excerpted from the Glossary of Agricultural Production, Programs, and Policy by Chuck Culver, Division of Agriculture, University of Arkansas, and Farm Commodity Legislation: Chronology 1933-2002 by Geoffrey Becker, Congressional Research Service.

Glossary of Terms

FoodSafetyReportFINAL. Public Citizen: New Report Reveals How Pending Trade Agreements Will Worsen Imported Food Safety Problem by Increasing Food Imports While Replicating Limits on U.S. Food Safety Policy From Past Trade Deals. WASHINGTON - JULY 25 -Remedying serious problems with imported food safety will require significant reforms to trade policy as well as improvements in domestic laws, according to a report released today by Public Citizens Global Trade Watch division.

Public Citizen: New Report Reveals How Pending Trade Agreements Will Worsen Imported Food Safety Problem by Increasing Food Imports While Replicating Limits on U.S. Food Safety Policy From Past Trade Deals

The report, Trade Deficit in Food Safety; Proposed NAFTA Expansions Replicate Limits on U.S. Food Safety Policy That Are Contributing to Unsafe Food Imports, documents the connection between trade agreements that limit domestic food safety policies to facilitate trade and the growing safety threat posed by food imports, which have doubled since implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the World Trade Organization (WTO) agreements.

A steadily increasing amount of food on U.S. dinner plates is imported. Nearly $65 billion in food is imported annually almost double the value imported when NAFTA and the WTO went into effect. More than 80 percent of the seafood Americans eat is imported. READ the report. RobertsFPT2005. Benefits and barriers to following HACCP-based food safety programs in childcare centers. From The jungle to HACCP: A first-hand view of the United States meat inspection process. Food safety training and foodservice employees' knowledge and behavior. RobertsJADA2008. GodfreyNkwantabisa2008. Impact of Restaurant Hygiene Grade Cards on Foodborne-Disease Hospitalizations in Los Angeles County. RUDAR - Roskilde University Digital Archive: Food Safety System Evolution in Latvia: The Driving Forces Behind Reformation and the Pursuit of Food Safety Insurance. Public%20Health%20and%20Veterinary%20Medicine%20vol%207%20no%202.

FDA and USDA Not Kept in the Loop on Food Imports, Says GAO ~ Newsroom ~ News from CSPI. CSPI Says Gaps in Import Safety Controls Identified are Troubling October 15, 2009.

FDA and USDA Not Kept in the Loop on Food Imports, Says GAO ~ Newsroom ~ News from CSPI

Conference for Food Protection. President's Food Safety Working Group. Cost of food-borne illnesses is deemed much higher than earlier estimates. Among the food scares in recent years was a deadly E. coli outbreak tied to… (Justin Sullivan / Getty…) Reporting from Los Angeles and Washington — It turns out that tainted food can not only make people sick, but it can also cost them a bundle in the process.

Cost of food-borne illnesses is deemed much higher than earlier estimates

A new consumer research report released Wednesday has found that the health-related costs of food-borne illnesses total $152 billion a year, including the costs of medical bills, lost wages and lost productivity. That total is more than four times that of earlier estimates calculated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The findings come as regulatory efforts to patrol the country's food sector are growing amid reports of a string of costly -- and sometimes fatal -- outbreaks of food-borne illness involving peanuts, jalapeno peppers, spinach, beef and other foods. In 1997, the USDA reportedly pegged the public cost of sickness and death from eating tainted food at $35 billion a year.

U.S. Azajac@latimes.com p.j.huffstutter@ Cost of foodborne illness differs by state - Health care, wellness, food nutrition, exercise, medical research news by reporters Kelly Brewington, Meredith Cohn and Andrea K. Walker. Foodborne illness in the United States is a costly matter, in terms of health, money for treatment and quality of life losses.

Cost of foodborne illness differs by state - Health care, wellness, food nutrition, exercise, medical research news by reporters Kelly Brewington, Meredith Cohn and Andrea K. Walker

Official government estimates of costs range from $6,9 billion to $35 billion, but a new report says those estimates don't take all costs into account and puts the tab much higher. The report is authored by a former U.S. Food and Drug Administration economist and is being released by the Produce Safety Project, which is supported by The Pew Charitable Trusts and Georgetown University. The new report says costs are more like $152 billion. Many illnesses' causes are unknown, but there are some usual and coslty suspects: Campylobacter-related costs are more than $18.8 billion, Salmonella's costs approach $14.6 billion and Listeria-associated costs were an estimated at $8.8 billion. States with the highest foodborne illness costs are California with $18.6 billion, Texas with $11.3 billion and New York with $10.4 billion. Producesafetyproject. Pew worked with Georgetown University on the Produce Safety Project from 2008 to 2010.

producesafetyproject

The Produce Saftey Project addressed a variety of threats to the nation’s food supply. Producesafetyproject. Pew worked with Georgetown University on the Produce Safety Project from 2008 to 2010.

producesafetyproject

The Produce Saftey Project addressed a variety of threats to the nation’s food supply. Rr2010_02. USDA proposes new <i>Salmonella</i>, <i>Campylobacter</i> standards for poultry. May 10, 2010 (CIDRAP News) – The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) today unveiled new standards aimed at reducing Salmonella and Campylobacter in broiler chickens and turkeys, a step the agency expects will prevent tens of thousands of illnesses each year.

USDA proposes new <i>Salmonella</i>, <i>Campylobacter</i> standards for poultry

The USDA said the new Campylobacter standard is the first such benchmark for that pathogen. At least one consumer group, the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), praised the standards as a major improvement in food safety. The standards, designed to encourage producers to continue to reduce the levels of pathogens in chicken and turkey products, set a maximum percentage of samples testing positive for a given pathogen at an establishment, the USDA said in a statement. The stricter performance standards are based on recent nationwide studies that measured baseline levels of Salmonella and Campylobacter in broiler chickens and turkeys.

See also: May 10 USDA press release Jan Consumer Reports survey May 10 CSPI press release. 11418. CFM_Part1. Enhancing Food Safety: The Role of the Food and Drug Administration. Report Recommended Risk-Based Approach (HTML) Press Release (HTML) Report Brief (PDF, HTML)

Enhancing Food Safety: The Role of the Food and Drug Administration

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