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Culture de la banane, changement climatique et empreinte carbone

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DAILYMAIL_CO_UK 03/09/19 Bananas have BENEFITED from climate change over the last 60 years but increasing temperatures could see numbers of the fruit decline. Bananas have BENEFITED from climate change over the last 60 years but increasing temperatures could see numbers of the fruit decline Researchers studied the impact of climate change on dessert banana yields They looked at the effects of global warming since 1961 and future predictionsGlobal warming has boosted average banana crop yields in the last six decadesHowever they warn that this benefit may be lost by 2050 if warming continues By Ian Randall For Mailonline Published: 06:58 EDT, 3 September 2019 | Updated: 06:58 EDT, 3 September 2019 'Yes, we have no bananas' may be sung again as experts warn that while climate change may have been increasing yields to date, this trend may soon drop off.

DAILYMAIL_CO_UK 03/09/19 Bananas have BENEFITED from climate change over the last 60 years but increasing temperatures could see numbers of the fruit decline

Researchers studied the past and predicted impact of global warming on desert bananas in 27 banana-producing countries. They found that average yields had increased with rising temperatures since 1961, but numbers of the fruit may be significantly diminished by 2050. Scroll down for video Loaded: 0% Limits to Climate Change Adaptation 16/11/17 Adapting Agriculture to Climate Change: Suitability of Banana Crop Production to Future Climate Change Over Uganda. FAO - 2017 - EMPREINTE CARBONE DE LA FILIÈRE DE LA BANANE. FAO - 2016 - ECUADOR’S BANANA SECTOR UNDER CLIMATE CHANGE. BIOVERSITY INTERNATIONAL 18/06/15 Bananas and climate change: what is going to happen to one of the world’s favourite fruits? Bioversity International scientists analyze the impact of climate change on banana cultivation in a new FAO book.

BIOVERSITY INTERNATIONAL 18/06/15 Bananas and climate change: what is going to happen to one of the world’s favourite fruits?

Bananas are a key crop for millions of households in developing countries, providing food, nutrition and income. Grown throughout the tropics and subtropics, bananas are a source of food, nutrition and income for millions of rural and urban households. They are a staple crop in many countries. In Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi, people consume each 3-11 bananas per day, and in Uganda, the local word for bananas – matooke – means food. The most recent reports on the impact of climate change on agricultural production show that, especially in the tropical regions, yields of certain crops will decline.

A team of researchers from Bioversity International and partners within the framework of the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security took up the challenge to respond to this question. Leer este artículo en español. Ecological Economics Volume 95, November 2013, Climate change driven shifts in the extent and location of areas suitable for export banana production. Analysis Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Coral Gables, FL 33146, USA Received 18 February 2013, Revised 14 June 2013, Accepted 1 August 2013, Available online 7 September 2013 Choose an option to locate/access this article: Check if you have access through your login credentials or your institution Check access doi:10.1016/j.ecolecon.2013.08.004 Get rights and content Highlights Predicted geographical shifts in areas suitable for banana production in the 2060s Nearly half of existing conventional plantation sample sites become unsuitable.

Ecological Economics Volume 95, November 2013, Climate change driven shifts in the extent and location of areas suitable for export banana production

IBTIMES 26/03/15 Climate Change And Food Security: Global Banana Market Is Feeling The Strain Of Hotter Weather, Longer Droughts. OLANCHITO, Honduras -- The farmlands hugging the Aguán River are an endless stretch of glossy green.

IBTIMES 26/03/15 Climate Change And Food Security: Global Banana Market Is Feeling The Strain Of Hotter Weather, Longer Droughts

Swaths of fronds cover the horizon, while neat green bunches of curling fruit peek out from under the shade. Banana plantations thrive in this valley, bringing year-round work to those who cut, clean and package the fruit for export to the United States. Yet the farmers and families who grow Honduras’ fruits are under increasing strain. Over the past few years, the sweltering summer rainy season has grown hotter and drier, forcing producers to pump up more groundwater or turn to expensive irrigation systems. Cold spells during the current dry season are becoming even cooler, slowing the rate at which bananas ripen. “We’re living in an era of climate change,” Carlos Posas explains, gesturing toward a shroud of banana stalks during a drive through a private plantation. Outside Olanchito in northern Honduras, the farmlands hugging the Aguán River are an endless stretch of glossy green.

AGROPOLIS MONTPELLIER - Workshop 3: Pests and diseases in Bananas - projecting the effects of climate change. Université de Kinshasa - Ingénieur agronome en phytotechnie 2007 Impacts du changement climatique sur la recrudescence des degࢠInternational Centre for Tropical Agriculture (Colombie) - Global Impacts and Implications of Climate Change on Banana Productio. CGIAR 04/10/11 Banana boom and bust as climate changes. For bananas and plantains, climate change may significantly alter both yields as well as vulnerability to diseases, which would affect the food security and incomes of millions of Africans and Latin Americans.

CGIAR 04/10/11 Banana boom and bust as climate changes

The East African Highland Banana, for example, is a starchy staple for 80 million people in Africa alone. Zoom in to see area harvested (2009) for the East Africa highland banana. The research comes from new studies on "climate proofing" key crops across the tropics. The studies by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) highlight how climate change will impact crops that are critical to food security in the developing world, and what adaptation strategies can help reduce these impacts. You can now explore the data behind the studies together with photos and videos of farmers in the affected regions on the newly launched Adaptation and Mitigation Knowledge Network. Warmer weather raises banana disease risk.