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Changement climatique et cacao

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AGRONOMY 22/04/21 Climate Change Impacts on Cacao: Genotypic Variation in Responses of Mature Cacao to Elevated CO2 and Water Deficit. Climate change poses a significant threat to agricultural production in the tropics, yet relatively little research has been carried out to understand its impact on mature tropical tree crops.

AGRONOMY 22/04/21 Climate Change Impacts on Cacao: Genotypic Variation in Responses of Mature Cacao to Elevated CO2 and Water Deficit

This research aims to understand the genotypic variation in growth and photosynthesis in mature cacao trees in response to elevated CO2 and water deficit. Six genotypes were grown under greenhouse conditions at ambient (ca. 437 ppm) and elevated CO2 (ca. 724 ppm) and under well-watered and water deficit conditions for 23 months. Leaf- and canopy-level photosynthesis, water-use efficiency, and vegetative growth increased significantly in response to elevated CO2. Water deficit had a significant negative effect on many photosynthetic parameters and significantly reduced biomass production. The negative effect of water deficit on quantum efficiency was alleviated by elevated CO2. ►▼ Show Figures Figure 1 ►▼ Show Figures Figure 1.

UCDAVIS_EDU 14/02/20 Chocolate in a Time of Climate Change. There’s something about that first satisfying snap into a bite of chocolate.

UCDAVIS_EDU 14/02/20 Chocolate in a Time of Climate Change

It’s almost transportive. From the tropical regions where cacao is grown to the companies that produce the confections we see in the store, that chocolate had to make a journey of its own, as well. Farmers and scientists from around the world are connecting at UC Davis to ensure this fragile bean continues to grow into one of the world’s most prolific foods for generations to come. Students and experts are working to better understand cacao, a vital ingredient necessary not only to chocolate production, but to many people across the world. As diverse as cacao is, so too, is the research surrounding it. Madeline Weeks, a Geography graduate student, has been doing her research on cacao and the impact of the cocoa and chocolate made from it in Guatemala. The project had two goals: On the one hand it was empowering these communities to export their own cacao. Growing solutions. XXXIIeme Colloque International de l'AIC - MAI 2019 - CHANGEMENT CLIMATIQUE, MUTATION DE LA PRODUCTION AGRICOLE ET PERCEPTIONS PAYSANNES DANS LA ZONE TOGOLAISE DE PRODUCTION DU CAFE ET DU CACAO (AFRIQUE DE L’OUEST)

PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY - 2019 - Thèse en ligne :CHOCOLATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE: INVESTIGATING GENDER DYNAMICS OF SMALL-SCALE CACAO PRODUCERS IN LAMPUNG AND SOUTH SULAWESI INDONESIA. AFROBAROMETER 11/07/18 Malgré la menace sur le cacao et le reboisement, seulement la moitié des Ivoiriens ont connaissance du changement climatique.

Agronomy for Sustainable 19/12/18 The physiological responses of cacao to the environment and the implications for climate change resilience. A review. AGRONOMY 20/08/20 Challenges to Cocoa Production in the Face of Climate Change and the Spread of Pests and Diseases. 1.

AGRONOMY 20/08/20 Challenges to Cocoa Production in the Face of Climate Change and the Spread of Pests and Diseases

Historical Trajectory of Cocoa Production When the Spaniards discovered Central America and Mexico (1504–1525), cocoa had already been produced, traded and consumed there for several centuries [1]. The cocoa tree was cultivated by the Aztecs and Mayas at that time, and archaeological studies have indicated its cultivation in the region called Soconusco (southern Mexico, northern Guatemala) long before that time [2]. Indeed, the first domestication of the cocoa tree would have been made by the Olmecs from 1000 BC. The Olmec civilization is considered the “mother civilization” of Mesoamerica [3].

After the discovery of this plant and the use of cocoa by Europeans, the extension of its cultivation has continued to grow. CIRAD 30/03/18 Cacao : face au changement climatique, l’agro-écologie à la rescousse. Contrairement aux annonces médiatiques alarmistes de ces derniers mois, le chocolat ne devrait pas disparaître à cause du changement climatique. A deux conditions cependant : d’une part que le scénario climatique le plus grave soit évité [1] , d’autre part que la culture du cacaoyer soit adaptée. Et cela, pas seulement à travers des variétés plus tolérantes à la sécheresse, mais également en adoptant des pratiques culturales plus agro-écologiques. « L’agro-écologie s’appuie sur des principes de diversité, d’utilisation efficiente des ressources naturelles, de recyclage des nutriments et de synergie entre les différentes composantes de l’agroécosystème » , explique Emmanuel Torquebiau, référent sur l’agroforesterie au Cirad. « L’agroforesterie est une pratique de l’agro-écologie qui consiste à associer des arbres aux cultures, soit dans des forêts existantes, soit à travers des plantations spécifiques.

Des cacaoyères agroforestières implantées sur des savanes …mais aussi plus durable.

Changement climatique et cacao au Nigeria

Changement climatique et cacao au Ghana. GWU_EDU - 2015 - Assessment of Climate Change Impacts on Cocoa Production and Approaches to Adaptation and Mitigation: A Contextual View of Ghana and Costa Rica. IDHSUSTAINABLETRADE 25/06/17 Climate Smart Cocoa - Sustainable Trade Initiative. AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES 07/09/16 Cocoa Farming System in Indonesia and Its Sustainability Under Climate Change. Hunan University - 2017 - CLIMATE CHANGE EFFECTS ON COCOA EXPORT: CASE STUDY OF COTE D’IVOIRE.

NEOTROPICAL BIODIVERSITY 24/01/17 Climate change and the risk of spread of the fungus from the high mortality of Theobroma cocoa in Latin America. BBC 11/12/15 Climate change a concern for W African cocoa producers. Annals of Agricultural and Environmental Medicine 2015, Vol 22, No 2, 357–361 Climate change induced occupational stress and reported morbidity among cocoa farmers in South-Western Nigeria. EAGLENEWS PH via YOUTUBE 17/01/16 Cocoa farming in Nicaragua booms after climate change wreaks havoc on coffee crops. LINKTV via YOUTUBE 30/07/13 Cameroon's Resilient Cocoa Farmers Fight Climate Change.

CLIMATIC CHANGE - 2012 - A way forward on adaptation to climate change in Colombian agriculture: perspectives towards 2050. WORLD COCA FOUNDATION 28/09/15 Présentation : Climate change & cacao: example from the Caribbean. CIAT - DEC 2015 - Trinidad & Tobago: Assessing the Impact of Climate Change on Cocoa and Tomato. JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENT AND EARTH SCIENCE - 2015 - Climate Change and the Cocoa Production in the Tropical Rain Forest Ecological Zone of Ondo State, Nigeria. FIC/IEH 10/01/13 ANALYSIS OF CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON COFFEE, COCOA AND BASIC GRAINS VALUE CHAINS IN NORTHERN HONDURAS. JOURNAL OF BIOLOGY, AGRICULTURE AND HEALTHCARE - 2013 - Climate Change Awareness and Coping Strategies of Cocoa Farmers in Rural Ghana.

AFRICAN CROP SCIENCE JOURNAL - 2012 - EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON COCOA PRODUCTIVITY IN NIGERIA. CIAT - SEPT 2011 - Predicting the Impact of Climate Change on the Cocoa-Growing Regions in Ghana and Cote d’Ivoire. Science of The Total Environment Volume 556, 15 June 2016, Vulnerability to climate change of cocoa in West Africa: Patterns, opportunities and limits to adaptation.

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Science of The Total Environment Volume 556, 15 June 2016, Vulnerability to climate change of cocoa in West Africa: Patterns, opportunities and limits to adaptation

Please enable JavaScript to use all the features on this page. This page uses JavaScript to progressively load the article content as a user scrolls. Click the View full text link to bypass dynamically loaded article content. <a rel="nofollow" href=" full text</a></div></span></div><br /> a C.P. 513, 68109-971 Santarém, Pará, Brazilb International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Managua, Nicaraguac International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Kampala, Uganda Received 19 May 2015, Revised 4 March 2016, Accepted 4 March 2016, Available online 11 March 2016 Editor: D.

Get rights and content Open Access Highlights. UNIVERSITY OF READING 29/03/10 New cocoa varieties needed to secure world's chocolate supply. Track title: New cocoa varieties needed to secure world’s chocolate supply Series name: Other.

UNIVERSITY OF READING 29/03/10 New cocoa varieties needed to secure world's chocolate supply

International Journal of Innovation and Applied Studies - DEC 2012 - Variabilité climatique et productions de café et cacao en zone tropicale humide : cas de la région de Daoukro (Centre-est de la Côte d’ivoire) De nouveaux génotypes pour mieux lutter contre les maladies. Procedia Environmental Sciences Volume 29, 2015, Pages 117–118 How Prepared are Cameroon's Cocoa Farmers for Climate Insurance? Evidence from the South West Region of Cameroon.

Volume 29, 2015, Pages 117–118 Agriculture and Climate Change - Adapting Crops to Increased Uncertainty (AGRI 2015) Edited By Dave Edwards and Giles Oldroyd Abstract It is a truism that Cameroon's agricultural sector in general and the cocoa sector in particular has been hit by climatic vagaries with telling repercussions.

Procedia Environmental Sciences Volume 29, 2015, Pages 117–118 How Prepared are Cameroon's Cocoa Farmers for Climate Insurance? Evidence from the South West Region of Cameroon

African Crop Science Journal, Vol. 20, Issue Supplement s2, pp. 487 - 491 2012 EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON COCOA PRODUCTIVITY IN.

African Crop Science Journal, Vol. 20, Issue Supplement s2, pp. 487 - 491 2012 EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON COCOA PRODUCTIVITY IN NIGERIA – guatemalt

INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR TROPICAL AGRICULTURE 29/09/11 Africa’s Chocolate Meltdown: climate change could threaten cocoa farmers. Climate change not only threatens the production of staple food crops, but could transform the cherished chocolate bar into a luxury few can afford, according to a new study released today.

INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR TROPICAL AGRICULTURE 29/09/11 Africa’s Chocolate Meltdown: climate change could threaten cocoa farmers

Enjoyed by sweet-toothed consumers the world-over, more than half of the world’s chocolate comes from the cocoa plantations of Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire, where hundreds of thousands of smallholder farmers supply lucrative Fair-trade markets in developed countries. But the new research by climate scientists at the Colombia-based International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT, by its Spanish acronym), reveals that an expected annual temperature rise of more than two degrees Celsius by 2050 will leave many of West Africa’s cocoa-producing areas too hot for chocolate.

Warmer conditions mean the heat-sensitive cocoa trees will struggle to get enough water during the growing season, curtailing the development of cocoa pods, containing the prized cocoa bean – the key ingredient in chocolate production. Summa phytopathol. vol.38 no.1 Botucatu Jan./Mar. 2012 An analysis of the risk of cocoa moniliasis occurrence in Brazil as the r. An analysis of the risk of cocoa moniliasis occurrence in Brazil as the result of climate change Análise do risco de ocorrência da monilíase em cacaueiro no Brasil face às mudanças climáticas globais Wanderson Bucker MoraesI,*,**; Waldir Cintra de Jesus JúniorI; Leonardo de Azevedo PeixotoI; Willian Bucker MoraesII; Edson Luiz FurtadoII; Lilianne Gomes da SilvaI; Roberto Avelino CecílioI; Fábio Ramos AlvesI IDepartment of Plant Production, Agricultural Science Center, Federal University of Espirito Santo (UFES), 29500-000, Alegre, ES, Brazil IIDepartment of Plant Protection, University Estadual Paulista "Julio de Mesquita Filho" (UNESP), Botucatu, SP, Brazil The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential risk of moniliasis occurrence and the impacts of climate change on this disease in the coming decades, should this pathogen be introduced in Brazil.

Summa phytopathol. vol.38 no.1 Botucatu Jan./Mar. 2012 An analysis of the risk of cocoa moniliasis occurrence in Brazil as the r

To this end, climate favorability maps were devised for the occurrence of moniliasis, both for the present and future time. AGROMETEOROLOGY 04/11/08 Cocoa and climate change: can the lame help the blind? Climate change, this blind force acting with changing rainfall patterns and amounts, and with increasing temperatures, influences cocoa production most often negatively.

AGROMETEOROLOGY 04/11/08 Cocoa and climate change: can the lame help the blind?

In many places, with more and also more aggressive extreme events and higher climate variability as well, this becomes worse. Indeed, it appears as if in quite some places the vulnerability of cocoa production to adverse climatic conditions will be exacerbated (e.g. Anim-Kwapong and Frimpong, 2005). Definitely, that is, if no or too little action is taken. Kees StigterAgromet Vision (Bondowoso, Indonesia and Bruchem, The Netherlands) [cjstigter@usa.net] Introduction Trees store much of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide and therefore also cocoa trees can mitigate global warming (Sommariba, 2006).

Reading the literature on cocoa production, with only few exceptions the industry has very often been paralysed by insustainability from a series of causes (e.g. Cocoa and climate change: can the lame help the blind? — International Society for Agricultural Meteorology. Climate change, this blind force acting with changing rainfall patterns and amounts, and with increasing temperatures, influences cocoa production most often negatively.

Cocoa and climate change: can the lame help the blind? — International Society for Agricultural Meteorology

In many places, with more and also more aggressive extreme events and higher climate variability as well, this becomes worse. Indeed, it appears as if in quite some places the vulnerability of cocoa production to adverse climatic conditions will be exacerbated (e.g. Anim-Kwapong and Frimpong, 2005). Definitely, that is, if no or too little action is taken. Kees StigterAgromet Vision (Bondowoso, Indonesia and Bruchem, The Netherlands) [cjstigter@usa.net] MARS - La portée mondiale du cacao - Le changement climatique met le cacao en danger dans le monde entier. Les dix premiers clusters de gènes du cacao ont été trouvés dans le bassin amazonien. Document_cw_01.pdf. Journal of Sustainable Development in Africa (Volume 12, No.1, 2010) EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON COCOA YIELD: A CASE OF COCOA RE. BIOADDICT 24/10/11 Le chocolat va-t-il devenir une denrée rare ? Les chanceux qui ont pu se rendre au salon du chocolat ce week-end ne diront pas le contraire. En plus de satisfaire nos papilles, les vertus du chocolat sont multiples.

Pourtant dans les années 2050, en raison du changement climatique, manger un carré de chocolat pourrait devenir un immense privilège... PARLEMENT EUROPEEN - Réponses à questions:E-011354/2011 Café, chocolat et changement climatique.