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Chalara au Royaume-Uni

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Biological Invasions 01/04/17 Getting invasive species on the political agenda: agenda setting and policy formulation in the case of ash dieback in the UK. A great deal of the research on invasive species and plant pests is focused primarily on ecological and biological implications and actions (see, e.g., Pautasso et al. 2012; Kirisits et al. 2012; Hantula et al. 2014).

Biological Invasions 01/04/17 Getting invasive species on the political agenda: agenda setting and policy formulation in the case of ash dieback in the UK

Any attempts to include a social science perspective are often limited to conducting a stakeholder survey or stakeholder communication exercises. This is not specific to the research on plant pests, but also applies to the natural sciences arena more generally, for instance within climate change debates (e.g., IPCC 2014). The broader systemic, legislative and political analytical role of social science tools and methodologies is often over-looked, resulting in prevention strategies being advocated in ignorance of many of the socio-political parameters that could have improved the chances of successful action/policy. Table 1 Summary of proposed measures to reduce the threat posed by common ash dieback to F. excelsior and its associated biodiversity.

MAAF - JUIN 2013 - La lettre du DSF. Au sommaire: Chalara fraxinae en Grande-Bretagne. FERA DEFRA 23/05/13 Pest Risk Analysis for Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus for the UK and the Republic of Ireland. FORESTRY COMMISSION WALES - 2013 - Présentation : Chalara fraxinea on ash, Phytophthora ramorum on larch: dealing with epidemic threats in the long term. FORESTRY COMMISSION (UK) 14/01/13 Chalara dieback of ash (Chalara fraxinea) Latest. NATURAL ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH COUNCIL 21/12/12 New genetics project could help save the ash tree.

New genetics project could help save the ash tree 21 December 2012, by Tamera Jones Scientists plan to decode the ash tree's entire genetic sequence in the hope of stopping Britain's trees from being completely devastated by the Chalara ash dieback fungal disease.

NATURAL ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH COUNCIL 21/12/12 New genetics project could help save the ash tree

Ash canopy. A small percentage of ash trees in Denmark are showing some resistance to the fungus. By decoding the tree's genetic sequence, scientists will take a crucial first step towards identifying the genes that confer this resistance. Together with field trials and breeding programmes, this knowledge will help produce a more resilient strain of the tree. IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON 07/11/12 Researchers test solution to fungal disease of ash trees. Imperial's Silwood Park Campus to carry out field trials for solution it is hoped can control Chalara fungal disease threatening the UK's ash trees Researchers have developed a low-cost solution that could control the fungal disease that is threatening the UK's 80 million ash trees.

IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON 07/11/12 Researchers test solution to fungal disease of ash trees

Initial tests are being carried out at Imperial College London's Silwood Park Campus in Berkshire, and will continue in Spring 2013. The fungus Chalara fraxinea entered the country via ash saplings imported from the European mainland and it has led to the destruction of an estimated 100,000 diseased saplings and mature trees in the UK in recent weeks. The UK Government has banned the import of foreign trees and the movement of UK ash trees, but agricultural experts warn this ban is too late because the disease is already established and spreading. Tim Mott, director of Natural Ecology Mitigation, said: "The product is formulated and patented and initial laboratory tests have been successfully completed. BBC 09/11/12 Owen Paterson: Ash dieback will not be eradicated. 9 November 2012Last updated at 10:01 ET By Mark Kinver and Matt McGrath BBC News Environment Secretary Owen Paterson: "The scientific advice is that it won't be possible to eradicate this disease" Environment Secretary Owen Paterson has acknowledged that ash dieback, a disease that threatens the UK's ash trees, will not be eradicated.

BBC 09/11/12 Owen Paterson: Ash dieback will not be eradicated

Announcing the government's action plan to tackle the disease, Mr Paterson said efforts would focus on slowing its spread through the countryside. Diseased young trees would be removed and destroyed, he added. But the action plan stated that there were no plans to remove mature trees, which are important for wildlife. It added that efforts would also focus on developing resistance to the disease. BBC 12/12/12 Ash dieback: Chalara fungus 'originated in Asia' 11 December 2012Last updated at 21:38 ET By Ania Lichtarowicz BBC Radio Science Unit An increasing body of evidence suggests that ash dieback - the disease which has killed trees across Europe and is now in Britain - originated in Japan.

BBC 12/12/12 Ash dieback: Chalara fungus 'originated in Asia'

Some scientists say the fungus now ravaging trees across Europe is the same as a native species from Japan. However, the Asian version of the fungus seems to cause no harm to the local Manchurian ash trees there. Researchers speaking to the Radio 4 programme The Tree Scientists described the misidentification of the fungus. Recent figures from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) show that there are almost 300 confirmed cases of ash dieback in Britain. The fungus has spread across Europe over 20 years, threatening many of the continent's ash trees - and was first seen in nurseries in Britain in spring 2012. The symptoms of ash dieback were first seen in Lithuania and Poland 20 years ago.

DAILYMAIL 10/11/12 Privet hedges linked to ash tree killer fungus which has infected over 80 million trees. By Valerie Elliott Published: 23:10 GMT, 10 November 2012 | Updated: 13:58 GMT, 11 November 2012 The privet hedge, a symbol of suburban Britain found in millions of private gardens, could be a secret killer of the nation’s 80 million ash trees.

DAILYMAIL 10/11/12 Privet hedges linked to ash tree killer fungus which has infected over 80 million trees

Other favourite garden plants – such as lilac trees and the flowering shrub forsythia – could also be harbouring the ash dieback disease, a Government scientific adviser warned last night. Dr Steve Woodward, a forestry pathologist at Aberdeen University, has helped draw up the emergency plan to tackle the deadly fungus, known as Chalara fraxinea. Guilty: The privet hedge, a symbol of suburban Britain could be responsible for wiping out ash trees He confirmed that the popular common garden species could be spreading fungal spores that are devastating ashes. ‘They may be carrying the fungus without being harmed, but when their leaves fall off they produce spores which could be affecting and spreading to ash trees.’

AGRICULTURE_GOV_IE 10/05/13 Présentation : Chalara ash dieback diesease – Symptoms and significance of the disease. NFI (UK) 15/02/13 NFI survey of the incidence of Chalara fraxinea infection of ash (Fraxinus excelsior) in Great Britain. GOV_UK - AVRIL 2014 - Tree Health Management Plan - Research Synopsis. Au sommaire: Chalara Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora kernoviae Oak processionary moth. ROYAL FORESTRY SOCIETY - MAI 2014 - MANAGING CHALARA FRAXINEA (ASH DIEBACK) GUIDANCE FOR WOODLAND OWNERS AND MANAGERS. UNIVERSITY OF YORK 18/06/14 Présentation : Mapping inheritance of low susceptibility to Chalara fraxinea in ash. 20MINUTES 03/02/13 Chalara: Le tueur en série des forêts britanniques. ENVIRONNEMENT «Chalara fraxinea», un champignon mortifère venu du continent, menace les quelque 126 millions de frênes de Grande-Bretagne...

20MINUTES 03/02/13 Chalara: Le tueur en série des forêts britanniques

Publié le Mis à jour le Mots-clés gb Simon Ellis est consterné: 50.000 arbres ont été détruits dans sa pépinière et des dizaines de milliers vont lui rester sur les bras. Le coupable s'appelle «Chalara fraxinea», un champignon mortifère venu du continent qui menace les quelque 126 millions de frênes de Grande-Bretagne.

Une première alerte a été lancée début 2012 quand il a été signalé sur des plants importés. Mais sa découverte à l'automne dans la nature a mis en émoi le pays qui craint de voir disparaître l'une des trois essences les plus répandues au Royaume-Uni. Ce champignon se développe sur les feuilles mortes au sol. Un «désastre écologique» Chalara est «susceptible de dévaster les paysages britanniques», s'alarme aussi Woodland Trust, une association de lutte pour la protection des forêts qui redoute un «désastre écologique».