background preloader

Autres informations

Facebook Twitter

Asia Pac J Clin Nutr 2008;17(S1):87-90 Application of agricultural biotechnology to improve food nutrition and healthcare products. HARVEST PLUS IFPRI - Présentation : A Methodology for Prioritizing Countries for Biofortification Interventions.

Références FAO/OMS concernant la biofortification

Biofortification. Biofortification is the idea of breeding crops to increase their nutritional value.

Biofortification

This can be done either through conventional selective breeding, or through genetic engineering. Biofortification differs from ordinary fortification because it focuses on making plant foods more nutritious as the plants are growing, rather than having nutrients added to the foods when they are being processed.[1] This is an improvement on ordinary fortification when it comes to providing nutrients for the rural poor, who rarely have access to commercially fortified foods.[2] As such, biofortification is seen as an upcoming strategy for dealing with deficiencies of micronutrients in the developing world. In the case of iron, WHO estimated that biofortification could help curing the 2 billion people suffering from iron deficiency-induced anemia. [3] Methodology[edit] Plants are bred using one of two main methods: Selective breeding[edit] Genetic modification[edit] Uses[edit]

Biofortified. P0INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY/PUNJAP AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY - Evaluation and utilization of Aegilops Germplasm for biofort48. Health Res Policy Syst. 2007; 5: 10. Biofortification in China: policy and practice. J. Nutr. March 1, 2002 Evaluating the Impact of Plant Biofortification on Human Nutrition. © 2002 The American Society for Nutritional Sciences Janet C.

J. Nutr. March 1, 2002 Evaluating the Impact of Plant Biofortification on Human Nutrition

King2 + Author Affiliations ↵2To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: jking@whnrc.usda.gov Abstract. J. Nutr. April 1, 2006 Biofortification of Staple Food Crops. Biofortification.

J. Nutr. April 1, 2006 Biofortification of Staple Food Crops

Biofortification is the development of micronutrient-dense staple crops using the best traditional breeding practices and modern biotechnology. This approach has multiple advantages. First, it capitalizes on the regular daily intake of a consistent and large amount of food staples by all family members. Because staple foods predominate in the diets of the poor, this strategy implicitly targets low-income households. Second, after the one-time investment to develop seeds that fortify themselves, recurrent costs are low, and germplasm can be shared internationally. International Journal of Health Geographics 2009, 8:29 Identifying candidate sites for crop biofortification in Latin America: c. PNAS 05/03/07 Biofortification of plant-based food: Enhancing folate levels by metabolic engineering.

PNAS 27/04/09 Transgenic multivitamin corn through biofortification of endosperm with three vitamins representing three distinct. Author Affiliations ↵1S.N. and C.Z. contributed equally to this work.

PNAS 27/04/09 Transgenic multivitamin corn through biofortification of endosperm with three vitamins representing three distinct

Communicated by Gurdev S. Khush, University of California, Davis, CA, February 10, 2009 (received for review November 24, 2008) Abstract. Food and Nutrition Bulletin, vol. 28, no. 2 (supplement) © 2007, From harvest to health: Challenges for developing biofortified. FOOD POLICY FOR DEVELOPING COUNTRIES - 2007 - Biofortification as a Vitamin A Deficiency Intervention in Kenya.

Angela Mwaniki.

FOOD POLICY FOR DEVELOPING COUNTRIES - 2007 - Biofortification as a Vitamin A Deficiency Intervention in Kenya

Biotechnology and Biofortification - Pocket K. The Ideal Diet: Sufficient and Balanced A major challenge of our time is that one sixth of the world’s population suffers from hunger, a situation which is totally unacceptable.

Biotechnology and Biofortification - Pocket K

In addition, many more people, over half of the global population, are afflicted by a different form of food deficiency (FAO, 2004). This “hidden hunger” is due to the quality, rather than the quantity, of the food available, and it is closely related to the fact that in many poor developing countries people rely only or mostly on low-protein staple crops for food. Nutrient deficiencies pertain mainly to proteins and micronutrients like vitamin A, iron, zinc, selenium and iodine. Conventional strategies to combat nutrient deficiencies include dietary supplements and food fortification programs. An adequate and diverse diet, comprising fruits, vegetables and animal products, is the best solution for good nutrition both in terms of energy requirement and micronutrients needs. ISB NEWS JUNE 2007 Au sommaire: Genetically Engineering Folate Biofortification in Tomato. The flow of transgenes into the wild via pollen and seeds is a serious concern for both the public and the scientific communities1.

ISB NEWS JUNE 2007 Au sommaire: Genetically Engineering Folate Biofortification in Tomato

There are also concerns that novel proteins in certain transgenic crops could cause adverse reactions in some individuals. The gene-deletor technology could be used to remove all transgenes from any organs of a transgenic plant when the functions of transgenes are no longer needed or their presence may cause concerns. The technology may provide a useful tool to address transgene flow problems and also food safety concerns over transgenic crops. RUTGERS UNIVERSITY/ CHINESE ACADEMY OF SCIENCES - 2008 - Biofortification for China: Political Responses to Food Fortification a. Biofortification for China: Political Responses to Food Fortification and GM Technology, Interest Groups, and Possible Strategies Carl Pray Rutgers University Jikun Huang Chinese Academy of Sciences Despite making enormous strides in reducing poverty, hunger, and malnutrition, China still has large numbers of people who do not consume sufficient micronutrients such as iron, zinc and Vitamin A.

RUTGERS UNIVERSITY/ CHINESE ACADEMY OF SCIENCES - 2008 - Biofortification for China: Political Responses to Food Fortification a

Proceedings of the Inaugural Symposium, 6 to 8 December 2004, Grand Regency Hotel, Nairobi, Kenya - Ex-Ante Evaluation of Nutrit. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society (2006), 65, 153–159 Biofortification of essential nutritional compounds and trace elements. IFPRI 03/09/02 BIOFORTIFIED CROPS FOR IMPROVED HUMAN NUTRITION. EUFIC - Comment est-il possible que des plantes transgéniques aient une valeur nutritionnelle plus élevée ? Allemagne Une plante transgénique contient un ou plusieurs gène(s) d’une autre espèce.

EUFIC - Comment est-il possible que des plantes transgéniques aient une valeur nutritionnelle plus élevée ?

Pour fabriquer une plante transgénique, les scientifiques doivent trouver un organisme – une certaine bactérie par exemple – qui produit une substance intéressante – le carotène nutritif par exemple – et identifier le(s) gène(s) responsable(s) de sa production. Ces gènes sont alors introduits, par des méthodes de biotechnologie, dans l’organisme cible – une graine de colza, par exemple – et font leur effet à l’intérieur de la plante de colza transgénique nouvellement créée.

Dans notre exemple, vous auriez maintenant une variété de colza qui est riche en carotène sain. Une autre possibilité est d’augmenter la quantité d’un nutritif déjà produit par une plante. Un exemple célèbre est le « riz doré ». Le riz blanc nourrit des millions de personnes à travers le monde mais ne contient pas de vitamine A. Veterinarni Medicina, 51, 2006 (5): 212–223 Genetically modified potato plants in nutrition and prevention of diseases in humans.

Journal of Food Distribution Research 35(1) - MARS 2004 - Consumer Biotechnology Food and Nutrition Information Sources: The Tru. DOSSIERS DU NET - OGM et nutrition. Annu. Rev. Nutr. 2009. 29:401–21 Nutrient Biofortification of Food Crops.