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WIKIPEDIA (EN) – Streptococcus iniae. Streptococcus iniae is a species of Gram-positive, sphere-shaped bacterium belonging to the genus Streptococcus.

WIKIPEDIA (EN) – Streptococcus iniae.

Since its isolation from an Amazon freshwater dolphin in the 1970s, S. iniae has emerged as a leading fish pathogen in aquaculture operations worldwide, resulting in over US$100M in annual losses. Since its discovery, S. iniae infections have been reported in at least 27 species of cultured or wild fish from around the world. Freshwater and saltwater fish including tilapia, red drum, hybrid striped bass, and rainbow trout are among those susceptible to infection by S. iniae. Infections in fish manifest as meningoencephalitis, skin lesions, and septicemia. WIKIPEDIA - Streptococcus iniae. Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre.

WIKIPEDIA - Streptococcus iniae.

Streptococcus iniae est le nom d'un microorganisme pathogène de la famille des streptocoques, gram-positive. Description et caractéristiques[modifier | modifier le code] Depuis son isolation sur un dauphin d'eau douce d'Amazonie dans les années 1970, S. iniae est apparu comme un pathogène majeur des poissons en aquaculture dans le monde entier, débouchant sur des centaines de millions de dollars de pertes annuelles. Depuis sa découverte, des infections à S. iniae ont été rapportées chez au moins 27 espèce de poissons sauvages ou d'élevage du monde entier, d'eau douce ou salée.

Les infections chez le poisson se manifestent comme une méningoencephalite, avec des lésions cutanées et une septicémie. Effets sur l'Homme[modifier | modifier le code] CDC EID - DEC 2009 - Towards Control of Streptococcus iniae. JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY MARS 2003 Invasive Streptococcus iniae Infections Outside North America. + Author Affiliations Streptococcus iniae, a fish pathogen causing infections in aquaculture farms worldwide, has only been reported to cause human infections in North America.

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY MARS 2003 Invasive Streptococcus iniae Infections Outside North America

In this article, we report the first two cases of invasive S. iniae infections in two Chinese patients outside North America. While the first patient presented with bacteremic cellulitis, which is the most common presentation in previous cases, the second patient represents the first recognized case of S. iniae osteomyelitis. Both S. iniae strains isolated from the two patients were either misidentified or unidentified by three commercial systems and were only identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Since no currently available commercial system for bacterial identification includes S. iniae in its database, 16S rRNA gene sequencing is the most practical and reliable method to identify the bacterium at the moment.

MMWR 02/08/96 Invasive Infection with Streptococcus iniae. During December 1995-February 1996, four cases of a bacteremic illness (three accompanied by cellulitis and the fourth with infective endocarditis, meningitis, and probable septic arthritis) were identified among patients at a hospital in Ontario.

MMWR 02/08/96 Invasive Infection with Streptococcus iniae

Streptococcus iniae, a fish pathogen not previously reported as a cause of illness in humans (1-3), was isolated from all four patients. All four patients were of Chinese descent and had a history of preparing fresh, whole fish; three patients for whom information was available had had an injury associated with preparation of fresh, whole fish purchased locally. This report summarizes information about these cases and presents preliminary findings of an ongoing investigation by health officials in Canada (4), which suggests that S. iniae may be an emerging pathogen associated with injury while preparing fresh aquacultured fish. Case Reports The period from injury to onset of symptoms for the three cases ranged from 16 hours to 2 days.

SANTE CANADA 01/08/96 INFECTION INVASIVE DUE À STREPTOCOCCUS INIAE : MALADIE NOUVELLE OU NON ENCORE RECONNUE. INFECTION AND IMMUNITY July 1998 Streptococcus iniae, a Human and Animal Pathogen: Specific Identification by the Chaperonin 60 Gene Identification Method. + Author Affiliations It was recently reported that Streptococcus iniae, a bacterial pathogen of aquatic animals, can cause serious disease in humans.

INFECTION AND IMMUNITY July 1998 Streptococcus iniae, a Human and Animal Pathogen: Specific Identification by the Chaperonin 60 Gene Identification Method

Using the chaperonin 60 (Cpn60) gene identification method with reverse checkerboard hybridization and chemiluminescent detection, we identified correctly each of 12 S. iniae samples among 34 aerobic gram-positive isolates from animal and clinical human sources. Streptococcus iniae was first isolated from skin lesions of freshwater dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) in the mid-1970s (8). In the 1980s, a newStreptococcus species, causing acute meningoencephalitis with mortalities as high as 50%, was isolated from infected rainbow trout (Onchorynchus mykiss) and diseased tilapia (Oreochromis species) farmed in Israel, Taiwan, and the United States (3, 4). This pathogen, which was namedStreptococcus shiloi, was subsequently shown to be genetically and phenotypically identical to S. iniae. INFECTION AND IMMUNITY Avril 2001 Streptococcus iniae Virulence Is Associated with a Distinct Genetic Profile.

+ Author Affiliations Streptococcus iniae causes meningoencephalitis and death in commercial fish species and has recently been identified as an emerging human pathogen producing fulminant soft tissue infection.

INFECTION AND IMMUNITY Avril 2001 Streptococcus iniae Virulence Is Associated with a Distinct Genetic Profile

As identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), strains causing disease in either fish or humans belong to a single clone, whereas isolates from nondiseased fish are genetically diverse. In this study, we used in vivo and in vitro models to examine the pathogenicity of disease-associated isolates.

Strains with the clonal (disease-associated) PFGE profile were found to cause significant weight loss and bacteremia in a mouse model of subcutaneous infection. As little as 102 CFU of a disease-associated strain was sufficient to establish bacteremia, with higher inocula (107) resulting in increased mortality.