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Agroforesterie et changement climatique

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WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM - DEC 2019 - How regenerative agroforestry could solve the climate crisis. Farming is responsible for almost 30% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM - DEC 2019 - How regenerative agroforestry could solve the climate crisis

Agriculture is the root cause of 80% of tropical deforestation. Regenerative agroforestry, an agricultural method that mimics natural ecosystems, could help reverse these trends. Our world is changing. The EU has just declared a climate emergency and stated that Europe must reach zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 - in the same year, our planet’s population is expected to hit 10 billion people. Global food production needs to prepare for an uncertain future and rising populations. Climate, soil and farming: an intimate relationship How we produce food is having a massive impact on our planet and driving the climate crisis. Inefficiency threatens biodiversity Turning biodiversity-rich areas into intensified, monoculture farming, drives land degradation and soil erosion, threatening the world’s food supplies. Small to no profits for farmers Climate crisis for farming Global farming has reached a crisis point. UCANR 16/10/19 Agroforestry and Climate Smart Agriculture.

There has been much buzz and renewed interest recently in planting trees as a tool to combat both the causes and impacts of climate change.

UCANR 16/10/19 Agroforestry and Climate Smart Agriculture

But what role do trees play in climate-smart agriculture? With respect to building healthy soils, tree canopy and leaf litter can provide protection against wind erosion and temperature extremes. Tree roots can help stabilize soils, increase nutrient cycling, and improve soil biota representative of a healthy soil system. The incorporation of trees and shrubs on agricultural landscapes, known as agroforestry, blends the practices of forestry and agriculture and can provide many ecological and economic benefits. The USDA defines agroforestry as “the intentional combination of agriculture and forestry to create productive and sustainable land use practices” [1]. Open Journal of Forestry,2014,4,439-456 Climate Change Impacts, Agroforestry Adaptation and Policy Environment in Sri Lanka. INSTITUT DE L ELEVAGE 30/08/17 L'agroforesterie, une solution pour lutter contre le changement climatique.

INSAM 24/01/11 Agroforestry in coping with meteorological and climatological risks. By Kees Stigter (Agromet Vision, cjstigter@usa.net).

INSAM 24/01/11 Agroforestry in coping with meteorological and climatological risks

January 17, 2011. The Overstory #233. Published on "The Oversory - agroforestry ejournal". Combating disasters by using agroforestry Trees outside forests and agroforestry are defined in BOX I. Maintaining natural ecosystems, such as coastal mangroves, coral reefs, floodplains and forests that may help buffer against natural hazards. Of the functions listed by Stolton et al. (2008), agroforestry systems come mainly in at the observation that protected areas can provide barriers against the impacts of drought and desertification by: Reducing pressure (particularly grazing pressure) on land and thus reducing desert formation.

As an example, in Portugal different high conservation value landscapes have been maintained due to agrosilvopastoral activities. Wildfires, particularly those induced by the heat waves of 2003 and 2005, affected Portuguese protected areas mainly through total burned areas. II. INDIAN JOURNALS - 2020 - Horticultural Agroforestry Systems Recommended for Climate Change Adaptation: A Review ; Horticultural Agroforestry Systems Recommended for Climate Change Adaptation: A Review Colmenares O.

INDIAN JOURNALS - 2020 - Horticultural Agroforestry Systems Recommended for Climate Change Adaptation: A Review ;

Montes, Brindis R. Castro, Verduzco C. Villanueva, Grajales M. Pérez1, Gómez M. 1Horticultura. 2Agroforestería para el Desarrollo Sostenible. *Corresponding Author: Miguel Uribe Gómez, Agroforestería para el Desarrollo Sostenible. Online published on 8 April, 2020. Abstract. Indian J. of Agroforestry Vol. 18 No. 1 : 1-9 (2016) Recent development in agroforestry research and its role in climate change adaptation and mitigation. Global Ecology and Conservation Volume 22, June 2020, Co-benefits and trade-offs of agroforestry for climate change mitigation and other sustainability goals in West Africa. Aalde et al., 2006.

Global Ecology and Conservation Volume 22, June 2020, Co-benefits and trade-offs of agroforestry for climate change mitigation and other sustainability goals in West Africa

Ecological Economics Volume 167, January 2020 Agroforestry as a pathway to agricultural yield impacts in climate-smart agriculture investments: Evidence from southern Malawi. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability volume 6, February 2014, Pages 61–67 Agroforestry solutions to address food security and climate change challenges in Africa ☆ ☆ K.F.S.

Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability volume 6, February 2014, Pages 61–67 Agroforestry solutions to address food security and climate change challenges in Africa ☆ ☆

King, T.M. ChandlerThe Wasted Lands: The Program of Work of the International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF) AGROSYS - OCT 2019 - Mémoire en ligne : Évaluer les impacts de pratiques agroforestières sur l’adaptation au changement climatique et le bilan carbone des élevages allaitants en Ariège. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment Volume 294, 1 June 2020, Agroforestry systems can mitigate the impacts of climate change on coffee production: A spatially explicit assessment in Brazil.

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Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment Volume 294, 1 June 2020, Agroforestry systems can mitigate the impacts of climate change on coffee production: A spatially explicit assessment in Brazil

Introduction Climate change is expected to impose severe challenges to farmers to maintain agricultural production levels in the future (IPCC, 2019; Schroth et al., 2009). This is particularly the case for producers of coffee, which is an important cash crop for approximately 25 million smallholder farmers and 100 million livelihoods in many countries in Africa, Mesoamerica, and South America (Pendergrast, 2010; Waller et al., 2007).

Coffea arabica is highly sensitive to changes in climate and global projections indicate a reduction in the area that is suitable for coffee production due to changing temperature and precipitation regimes (DaMatta, 2004; DaMatta and Cochicho Ramalho, 2006; Ovalle-Rivera et al., 2015). This may force coffee production to move to other regions with more favourable climatic conditions.