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FOOD AND FARMING FUTURES - 2017 - Farming insects in the UK. Farming is always changing, with new crop varieties, livestock breeds, and management techniques developing every year.

FOOD AND FARMING FUTURES - 2017 - Farming insects in the UK

Insect farming is one of the newest farming innovations, with benefits throughout food supply chains. Insect production has many advantages; efficient creation of protein, less food waste, less air and water pollution, fewer livestock welfare issues, lower risk of diseases, and reduced environmental consequences of intensive farming. This inspired the United Nations’ FAO and other institutions to initiate insect farming. The day was divided into two sessions; in the morning invited speakers provided summaries on progress being made in insect production, and the current legislative and practical obstacles. There followed an open ‘Industry Showcase’ slot, where current businesses had the opportunity to summarise their work. Ohio State University IPM Program via YOUTUBE 11/05/16 Introduction to Entomophagy. Ohio State University IPM Program via YOUTUBE 11/05/16 Culinary aspects of eating insects - Kevin Bachhuber.

BBC VIA YOUTUBE 19/03/13 Can Eating Insects Save the World BBC full Documentary 2013 ( Insect eating animals) International Journal of Gastronomy and Food Science Volume 7, April 2017, Exploring young foodies׳ knowledge and attitude regarding entomophagy: A qualitative study in Italy. Food and Chemical Toxicology Volume 100, February 2017, Evaluation of hazardous chemicals in edible insects and insect-based food intended for human consumption.

5th African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE) Conference - SEPT 2016 - Consumer Acceptance of Edible Insects for Non-Meat Protein in Western Kenya. NFS Journal Volume 4, October 2016, Nutritional and sensory quality of edible insects. BFR 24/05/16 Présentation : The significance of edible insects as food and feed for world nutrition. Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety - NOV 2013 - Safety of Novel Protein Sources (Insects, Microalgae, Seaweed, Duckweed, and Rapeseed) and Legislative Aspects for Their Application in Food and Feed Production. Introduction In response to the Kyoto Protocol on the global climate, the European Union (EU) made agreements on reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety - NOV 2013 - Safety of Novel Protein Sources (Insects, Microalgae, Seaweed, Duckweed, and Rapeseed) and Legislative Aspects for Their Application in Food and Feed Production

Major sources of these gas emissions are cattle breeding and related meat consumption (Steinfeld and others 2006; Van Beukering and others 2008). In the last decades, the global consumption of animal proteins has increased continuously. Between 1950 and 2000, the global human population more than doubled from 2.7 to 6 billion people. Meat production, however, increased by a factor of 5 from 45 to 233 billion kg per year.

Animal proteins are produced inefficiently. Novel protein sources (like insects, algae, duckweed, and rapeseed) are expected to enter the European feed and food market. Currently, research on novel proteins is conducted on the functionality, processing, and industrial application of novel proteins, and the valorization of by-products or waste streams obtained in other processes. Novel Proteins. PARLEMENT EUROPEEN - Réponse à question P-009015-16 Insects as human food. PARLEMENT EUROPEEN - Réponse à question E-007650-16 Authorising the use of insect protein as food and animal feed. The European Food Safety Authority has given the green light for protein production using insects, and the Commission is already funding a research project in this area.

PARLEMENT EUROPEEN - Réponse à question E-007650-16 Authorising the use of insect protein as food and animal feed

However, Regulation (EU) No 999/2001 and its annexes currently authorise the use of processed animal protein only in the form of fish meal as animal feed for non-ruminant farm animals. Start-up companies in Spain and Belgium are already producing protein from the larvae of the black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens) as the basis for animal feed. There are as yet no uniform European rules on this matter. 1. Does the Commission have information on European companies that produce protein from black soldier fly larvae as the basis for food or animal feed, and if so, can it say how the countries in question have dealt with the issue of authorisation thus far?

2. 3. Appetite Volume 107, 1 December 2016 Consumer acceptance of insect-based foods in the Netherlands: Academic and commercial implications. Open Access Highlights Reports qualitative research with consumers of insect-based foods.

Appetite Volume 107, 1 December 2016 Consumer acceptance of insect-based foods in the Netherlands: Academic and commercial implications

Distinguishes between initial motivations and repeat consumption factors. Factors affecting repeat consumption are highly conventional. Food Quality and Preference Volume 39, January 2015, Profiling consumers who are ready to adopt insects as a meat substitute in a Western society. UPPSALA UNIVERSITY - 2015 - Insects as food - someting for the future? Trends in Food Science & Technology. 06/2015; Why We Still Don’t Eat Insects: Assessing Entomophagy Promotion Through a Diffusion of Innovations Framework. PROGRESS IN NUTRITION - 2015 - Entomophagy and italian consumers: an exploratory analysis. JOURNAL OF SENSORY STUDIES 29/10/13 Edible insects acceptance by Belgian consumers: promising attitude for entomophagy development.

Journal of Insects as Food and Feed 12/2015 'Entomophagy': an evolving terminology in need of review. INSTITUTE OF DEVELOPMENT STUDIOS 23/09/15 Edible Insects and the Future of Food: A Foresight Scenario Exercise on Entomophagy and Global Food Security. This document reports on the findings of a small project in which we used the tools of Foresight to think about the potential of edible insects to contribute to global food security in a future global food system.

INSTITUTE OF DEVELOPMENT STUDIOS 23/09/15 Edible Insects and the Future of Food: A Foresight Scenario Exercise on Entomophagy and Global Food Security

Foresight offers a tool box of approaches and methods for thinking about the future in a methodical, deliberative way. Foresight methods can be used to anticipate (rather than predict) plausible future developments, which can help society to prepare itself to meet future challenges, and also to think about ways to steer towards desired futures and avoid negative outcomes. Researchers have identified more than 1,900 species of insect that feature in human diets around the world. Eastern Kentucky University - FEV 2014 - Thèse en ligne : Embracing Entomophagy: Challenging Attitudes Through Visual Art.

Abstract The idea of eating insects, formally known as entomophagy, is something held in great abhorrence by our Western culture.

Eastern Kentucky University - FEV 2014 - Thèse en ligne : Embracing Entomophagy: Challenging Attitudes Through Visual Art

It is to our own detriment that we treat the globally common practice with such contempt. The benefits we stand to gain could open new economic markets, improve American health, and dramatically cut the strain on global resources. The only things stopping us are our first world attitudes. Changing something as ingrained as personal biases and individual taste takes more than a persuasive paper. Recommended Citation Hinds, Carol M. Journal of Cell and Animal Biology Vol. 4 (7), pp. 112-118, July 2010 Climate change and the abundance of edible insects in the Lake Victoria Region. Rajiv Gandhi University (Inde) - 2009 - ENTOMOPHAGY, AN ETHNIC CULTURAL ATTRIBUTE CAN BE EXPLOITED TO CONTROL INCREASED INSECT POPULATION DUE TO GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: A CASE STUDY. Review Article Entomophagy and human food security R.T.

Rajiv Gandhi University (Inde) - 2009 - ENTOMOPHAGY, AN ETHNIC CULTURAL ATTRIBUTE CAN BE EXPLOITED TO CONTROL INCREASED INSECT POPULATION DUE TO GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: A CASE STUDY

Gahukara1 c1 a1 Arag Biotech Private Limited, Plot 220, Reshimbag, Nagpur 440 009, India. Food Chain 07/2014; 4(2):103-118 Insects in the human food chain: global status and opportunities. WAGENINGEN UNVERSITY - 2015 - Nouvelle revue : Journal of Insects as Food and Feed (articles en open access) WAGENINGEN UNIVERSITY 17/03/14 Insect cookbook now also available in English. Wageningen Scientists Arnold van Huis and Marcel Dicke and cooking instructor Henk van Gurp launched the English translation of the Insect Cookbook on Monday.

WAGENINGEN UNIVERSITY 17/03/14 Insect cookbook now also available in English.

They presented the first copy of the book to the upcoming President of Wageningen UR’s executive board, Louise O. Fresco. Advantages of eating insects During the book launch, author Arnold van Huis emphasized that eating insects has many advantages. Insects are much more efficient in turning nutrients into body weight, he argued, they also discharge less greenhouse gasses and require less land than conventional production animals.

UTEXAS_EDU - 2014 - Edible Insects: UT Austin and Texas’ Future Role in Sustainable Agriculture. NORDIC FOOD LAB 16/05/13 Major funding awarded for edible insect research in Denmark. Our official press release: Velux Foundation to support Nordic Food Lab’s development of Western insect gastronomy COPENHAGEN – May 16, 2013 – Nordic Food Lab and University of Copenhagen have received funding to expand their research into insect gastronomy.

NORDIC FOOD LAB 16/05/13 Major funding awarded for edible insect research in Denmark

While other researchers are focussing on environmental and nutritional benefits of entomophagy, Nordic Food Lab is working to make insects delicious to the Western palate and thus bring them into its culinary culture. The project is funded by The Velux Foundation’s program for environment and sustainability. The Foundation has granted 3.6 million Danish Kroner for the project entitled ‘Discerning Taste: Deliciousness as an Argument for Entomophagy’. Nordic Food Lab has formed an international advisory board for the project, bringing together experts in entomology, gastronomy, psychology, and sustainable food systems from around the world. J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2013; 9: 50. Comparative Survey of Entomophagy and Entomotherapeutic Practices in Six Tribes of Eastern Arunachal Pradesh (India)

IFT 12/06/13 IFT WEEKLY NEWSLETTER. . Au sommaire: Edible insect research receives funding. June 12, 2013 Senate passes farm billAccording to the New York Times, the U.S.

IFT 12/06/13 IFT WEEKLY NEWSLETTER. . Au sommaire: Edible insect research receives funding

Senate approved a new farm bill on June 10 that will cost nearly $955 billion over the next 10 years. The bill, which finances programs such as crop insurance for farmers, food assistance for low-income families, and foreign food aid, passed with overwhelming bipartisan support, 66 to 27. The Senate passed a similar bill last year, but the House failed to bring its bill to a vote. The last farm bill that was passed by both chambers, in 2008, was extended until Sept. 30. The Senate bill would cut $24 billion from current spending levels, including about $4.1 billion from food stamps over the next 10 years.

In the House, the farm bill faces a much tougher road. New York Times article Food insecurity may be short-term for most U.S. householdsThe U.S. In the period from 2008 to 2011, the percentage of food insecure households in the United States was 14.5–14.9%. Food Chemistry Available online 15 November 2014 Review of food composition data for edible insects. FAO - 2013 - Edible insects - Future prospects for food and feed security. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this information product do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) concerning the legal or development status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

The mention of specific companies or products of manufacturers, whether or not these have been patented, does not imply that these have been endorsed or recommended by FAO in preference to others of a similar nature that are not mentioned. The views expressed in this information product are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of FAO. FAO 12/05/14 Discussion paper: Regulatory frameworks influencing insects as food and feed. Entomophagy and its impact on world cultures: the need for a multidisciplinary approach.

Ecol Food Nutr. 2014 September-October;53(5):543-561. Exploring Consumer Acceptance of Entomophagy: A Survey and Experiment in Australia and the Netherlands. Department of Primary Industries Victoria - 2012 - Présentation : Title importance of recording local knowledge about edible insects in Australia. NORDIC FOOD LAB 16/05/13 Major funding awarded for edible insect research in Denmark. IFT 12/06/13 IFT WEEKLY NEWSLETTER. . Au sommaire:Edible insect research receives funding. 2013 - Edible insects - Future prospects for food and feed security. CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 103, NO. 1, 10 JULY 2012 Entomophagy can support rural livelihood in India. Feira de Santana State University - 2012 - Présentation : ANTHROPOENTOMOPHAGY IN BRAZIL: AN OVERVIEW. Bioinformation. 2012; 8(10): 489–491. MEIMAN: Database exploring Medicinal and Edible insects of Manipur. NYTIMES 04/01/11 Pesticides Threaten Ant-Eating Tradition in Brazil. WORLD JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY - 2010 - Entomophagy amont tertiary institutions in Southwestern Nigeria.

2010 - Edible insects and other invertebrates in Australia: future prospects. An Exploration on Greenhouse Gas and Ammonia Production by Insect Species Suitable for Animal or Human Consumption. Background Greenhouse gas (GHG) production, as a cause of climate change, is considered as one of the biggest problems society is currently facing. The livestock sector is one of the large contributors of anthropogenic GHG emissions. Also, large amounts of ammonia (NH3), leading to soil nitrification and acidification, are produced by livestock.

Therefore other sources of animal protein, like edible insects, are currently being considered. Methodology/Principal Findings. SCIENCE DAILY 11/01/11 Edible insects produce smaller quantities of greenhouse gasses than cattle. Insects produce much smaller quantities of greenhouse gases per kilogram of meat than cattle and pigs. This is the conclusion of scientists at Wageningen University who have joined forces with government and industry to investigate whether the rearing of insects could contribute to more sustainable protein production.

Insect meat could therefore form an alternative to more conventional types of meat. Cattle farming worldwide is a major producer of greenhouse gases. For the assessment of the sustainability of insect meat, the researchers at Wageningen University quantified the production of greenhouse gases of several edible insect species. The results of the study were published in the online journal PLoS ONE on 29 December. The research team has for the first time quantified the greenhouse gases produced per kilogram of insect product. FAO 24/01/12 Présentation : Nutrition and food safety of edible insects. FAO 04/07/12 Présentation : Review of food composition data on edible insects. Annu. Rev. Entomol. 2013. 58:141–60 Nutritional Ecology of Entomophagy in Humans and Other Primates.