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INSTITUTE OF BIOLOGICAL, ENVIRONMENTAL AND RURAL SCIENCES - JANV 2017 - Potential sources of protein for animal feed: Insects. PARLEMENT EUROPEEN - Réponse à question E-007650-16 Authorising the use of insect protein as food and animal feed. The European Food Safety Authority has given the green light for protein production using insects, and the Commission is already funding a research project in this area.

PARLEMENT EUROPEEN - Réponse à question E-007650-16 Authorising the use of insect protein as food and animal feed

However, Regulation (EU) No 999/2001 and its annexes currently authorise the use of processed animal protein only in the form of fish meal as animal feed for non-ruminant farm animals. Start-up companies in Spain and Belgium are already producing protein from the larvae of the black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens) as the basis for animal feed. There are as yet no uniform European rules on this matter. 1.

Does the Commission have information on European companies that produce protein from black soldier fly larvae as the basis for food or animal feed, and if so, can it say how the countries in question have dealt with the issue of authorisation thus far? 2. 3. GLOBAL FOOD SECURITY 23/10/15 Report explores using insects to feed livestock. Share this page: Sets a cookie 23 October 2015 The Global Food Security Programme has produced a report examining the potential of insects as animal feed following a workshop in August 2015.

GLOBAL FOOD SECURITY 23/10/15 Report explores using insects to feed livestock

The workshop aimed to identify knowledge gaps and scope the priorities for research around the use of insects as an alternative animal feed. Its purpose was to explore and highlight possible issues associated with rearing insects on an industrial scale. Participants, including representatives from academia, industry and policy, identified five key priorities: availability and suitability of substrates, safety, legislation, economics of production and consumer acceptance. CORDIS - Projet de recherche 2013-2016 - PROTEINSECT - Enabling the exploitation of Insects as a Sustainable Source of Protein for Animal Feed and Human Nutrition.

Enabling the exploitation of Insects as a Sustainable Source of Protein for Animal Feed and Human Nutrition From 2013-02-01 to 2016-04-30, ongoing project Project details Total cost: EU contribution:

CORDIS - Projet de recherche 2013-2016 - PROTEINSECT - Enabling the exploitation of Insects as a Sustainable Source of Protein for Animal Feed and Human Nutrition

Animal Feed Science and Technology Volume 204, June 2015 Insects in animal feed: Acceptance and its determinants among farmers, agriculture sector stakeholders and citizens. GLOBAL MEAT 17/04/15 Favourable views on insects as animal feed. It recently published its study: Insects in animal feed: Acceptance and its determinants among farmers, agriculture sector stakeholders and citizens, in the journal Animal Feed Science and Technology, which showed that only 17% of the 415 farmers, agriculture stakeholders and consumers surveyed rejected the idea.

GLOBAL MEAT 17/04/15 Favourable views on insects as animal feed

The study found that the resulting livestock products, from using insects in feed, were viewed as being more sustainable, nutritious and healthy, however it was suggested there was a risk of off-flavours and allergens. According to the University, the use of insects in feed is one potential solution to improving the sustainability of animal diets, as well as maintaining the legitimacy of livestock production. The Flanders region has a highly specialised intensive livestock farming industry, according to the University. Poultry meat from animals fed on insect-based diets was rejected by 17%, while interestingly beef from cattle fed on insect-based diets was rejected by 25%. JOURNAL OF INSECTS AS FOOD AND FEED - 2015 - Exploring the chemical safety of fly larvae as a source of protein for animal feed.

FAO 21/10/14 Insect meal has potential as a future animal feed, FAO study finds. New animal feed sources needed to free up land and water for human food As demand for meat, milk and dairy products grows, the issue of what to feed livestock becomes more critical because of the limited availability of natural resources, ongoing climate change issues and competition between human food, animal feed and biofuel for land and water.

FAO 21/10/14 Insect meal has potential as a future animal feed, FAO study finds

Insect meals may be part of the solution, according to a new FAO study published in the latest issue of the scientific journal Animal Feed Science and Technology. Le site du projet Proinsect en question. One of the primary objectives of PROteINSECT is to encourage the evolution of a positive and receptive platform in Europe for the utilisation of insect protein in animal feed in the short term and as a direct component of human food in the longer term.

Le site du projet Proinsect en question.

This will be achieved through a range of activities aimed at engaging and informing key stakeholders and consumers. Current European and worldwide legislation, regulation, policies and guidance related to the use of insects in animal feed and food has been mapped in order to establish a starting-point. This has enabled the identification of key challenges and areas that need to be addressed. A consensus business case for the use of insects in animal feed is being created and will be presented at an expert seminar due to be held in 2014. Additionally, position papers are being developed to provide information tailored to key stakeholder groups which include feed producers, farmers, regulators and animal welfare experts. FOOD NAVIGATOR 27/03/15 Would consumers eat animals fed on insect protein? . The PROteINSECT survey is seeking to understand the level of consumer acceptance for wide scale adoption of insects in feed.

FOOD NAVIGATOR 27/03/15 Would consumers eat animals fed on insect protein? .

Interest in the use of insects as a source of protein for animals and humans has been growing. The UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) has highlighted the potential benefits of insects as food for animals and humans, to health, the environment and livelihoods around the world. Protein from insect larvae may be considered an affordable and sustainable option as feed for animals but certain questions need to be addressed first, said project co-ordinator Dr Elaine Fitches. “There is little point in developing this concept if the public are seriously against the idea and not likely to buy meat or fish fed on insect containing diets,” she said. CURRENT SCIENCE 25/10/14 Insects related to veterinary and fisheries sciences. Journal of Cleaner Production Volume 65, 15 February 2014 Insect meal as renewable source of food for animal feeding: a review. Review a Department of Biology and Geology, University of Almería, 04120 Almería, Spainb Department of Engineering, University of Almería, CEIA3, 04120 Almería, Spainc BITAL – Research Center on Agricultural and Food Biotechnology, University of Almería, 04120 Almería, Spain Received 5 October 2013, Revised 18 November 2013, Accepted 25 November 2013, Available online 4 December 2013 Choose an option to locate/access this article: Check if you have access through your login credentials or your institution Check access doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2013.11.068.

Journal of Cleaner Production Volume 65, 15 February 2014 Insect meal as renewable source of food for animal feeding: a review

WAGENINGEN UNIVERSITY - 2014 - New European source of protein for animal feed. At present, soya from Latin and North America is an important raw ingredient for protein-rich animal feed in the Netherlands and the rest of Europe.

WAGENINGEN UNIVERSITY - 2014 - New European source of protein for animal feed

This is making a deep impact on land use and biodiversity locally and worldwide. Wageningen UR is engaging with various partners in scientific and applied research to explore opportunities for producing protein in Europe. The ultimate aim is to build a better quality of life by cultivating protein-rich crops in Europe, breeding protein-rich insects, and refining biomass into valuable proteins. AFRICAN JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH 26/09/13 Utilization of maggot meal in the nutrition of African cat fish. Animal Feed Science and Technology Volume 197, November 2014, State-of-the-art on use of insects as animal feed.

FOOD NAVIGATOR 18/10/13 Insects in animal feed? EU project calls for law change to improve meat sustainability. Insects could be used in animal feed to improve the sustainability of meat production – but insects are currently not allowed in feed under EU legislation.

FOOD NAVIGATOR 18/10/13 Insects in animal feed? EU project calls for law change to improve meat sustainability.

An EU-funded project is suggesting that the law needs to change. According to the project PROteINSECT, there is growing interest in insects as an alternative source of protein in animal feed, especially considering that insects already are a part of the natural diet of pigs and poultry. Although European legislation allows insects in feed for fish and shellfish, it prevents their use in other animal feed. Currently, protein in feed tends to come from grains and oilseeds, but this project suggests insects could provide a more sustainable alternative. Coordinated in the UK by FERA (the Food and Environment Research Agency), the EU-funded project is working with partners primarily in Europe, but also in China, Mali and Ghana, in order to push legislative changes.

BBC 04/06/14 How insects could feed the food industry of tomorrow. Would you eat meat fed on maggots? Raising pigs, chickens and fish on insect larvae could change the way we farm animals, says Nic Fleming Millions of maggots squirm over blackened pieces of fruit and bloody lumps of fetid flesh. A pungent stench of festering decay hovers over giant vats of writhing, feasting larvae. It's more than enough to put most people off their lunch. Yet these juvenile flies could soon be just one step in the food chain away from your dinner plate. DROVER 22/01/12 High-protein insect studied at Mississippi State.

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Imagine an insect that can eat nearly anything, control microbes, live off of water alone in the adult stage, and be a good source of protein for animal feed. The black soldier fly is real, not science fiction, and it has researchers at Mississippi State University abuzz with excitement. John Schneider, a professor of entomology in MSU’s Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entomology and Plant Pathology, said the black soldier fly is a native insect common to the Southeast. Because it is not attracted to human living spaces or food, it is not considered a pest. As part of the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Experiment Station, MSU scientists are studying the black soldier fly as a potential solution to dealing with large amounts of waste while also generating a feed product.

“Black soldier flies are 40 to 45 percent protein by dry weight,” he said. “They’re not a known disease carrier, they don’t bite or sting, and they’re not a nuisance,” he said. Food Control Volume 26, Issue 2, August 2012, Microbiological aspects of processing and storage of edible insects. Abstract Growing pressure on the worlds’ livestock production sector and enduring protein undernourishment, persuade the search for alternative protein sources. MEDIACLUBSOUTH AFRICA 07/02/12 Maggots: a sustainable animal feed. The common housefly could be a bigfactor in easing the strain on natural marine resources, if the Drew brothers have their way. (Image: Shadowness) MEDIA CONTACTS • Jason DrewThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. AgriProtein + 27 21 422 1887 or +27 83 700 5255 RELATED ARTICLES • New bug leaps into history books • Malaria-proof mosquito a reality • Tanzania's 'butterfly effect' • Pick n Pay greens seafood operations Emily van Rijswijck.

FOODSTUFFSA 24/01/12 Maggot protein is new fishmeal for livestock, says SA start-up. The world urgently needs new and sustainable sources of protein. Two South African entrepreneurs believe one answer lies in the humble maggot (larva of a fly). Their business, AgriProtein, is already well on the path to large-scale commercialisation of a win-win-win, non-marine-based alternative for livestock and fish farming feed. Entrepreneur, David Drew, and his environmentalist brother, Jason, have established a small pilot plant near Stellenbosch in the Western Cape, that will be up scaled this year into a trial plant converting millions of the grubs into tons of rich protein powder per day to supplement commercial livestock and fish diets.

Journal of Applied Biosciences 48: 3279– 3283 2011 Substitution de la farine de poisson par la farine d’asticots sèches dans le. AME NATURE 02/01/12 Des mouches pour nourrir les vaches ? L'idée de l'insecte (au sens large) comme ressource alimentaire n'est pas nouvelle. Les insectes sont mangées un peu partout dans le monde et divers programmes concernant les asticots ou les grillons pourraient constituer une solution locale à la faim dans le monde. L'intérêt est que chaque paysan peut produire assez d'insectes pour se nourrir et vendre sur le marché. La nourriture ainsi obtenue est d'excellente qualité et divers programmes de la FAO éduquent à des rations équilibrées sur base de menus centrés sur les insectes. La recette semble difficile à importer en Occident, mais une idée simplissime et géniale permet d'envisager de nourrir les animaux avec leurs propres abats, via les mouches.

Une telle idée pourrait mettre fin au désintérêt et à la suspicion, et pour tout dire la moquerie, que suscite l'idée d'utiliser en Occident les insectes comme aliments. Journal of Animal & Plant Sciences, 2011. Vol. 12, Issue 2: 1543-1551 Revue bibliographique sur les asticots et leur emploi dans. JANV 2012 - TECHNICAL CONSULTATION MEETING 23-25 January 2012, FAO, Rome, Italy Assessing the Potential of Insects as Food.

ALL ABOUT FEED 18/06/12 Insects as animal feed commodity appears feasible. PARLEMENT EUROPEEN - Réponse à question : E-002129/2011 La farine alimentaire d'insectes comme une nouvelle source durable de pr. L'utilisation d'insectes à des fins d'alimentation des animaux n'est pas autorisée actuellement. La législation relative à l'encéphalopathie spongiforme bovine (ESB) et aux encéphalopathies spongiformes transmissibles (EST) (règlement (CE) no 999/2001) interdit l'utilisation des protéines animales transformées lorsque l'on entend par «animaux» «tous les vertébrés et invertébrés». Dans la mesure où il existe un besoin structurel de protéines de haute qualité, plusieurs dérogations sont répertoriées à l'annexe IV du règlement (CE) no 999/2001, y compris la farine alimentaire de poisson.

La Commission convient-elle que du point de vue de l'ESB/EST, la farine alimentaire d'insectes comporte un profil à risque encore plus bas que la farine alimentaire de poisson, puisque les insectes sont très différents des vertébrés du point de vue de l'évolution? La Commission envisage-t-elle d'accepter la farine alimentaire d'insectes comme un ingrédient pour l'alimentation des animaux?