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RETOOLING METROPOLIS - 2016 - Restaurant Hygiene and Social Media: How to Improve Regulatory Disclosures in the Digital Age. Protecttheharvest VIA YOUTUBE 31/07/13 Food Safety Misconceptions and the Effect of Social Media. Kalami Cebu!!! VIA YOUTUBE 09/10/16 How Social Media changed the Food Industry. Michigan State University Online VIA YOUTUBE 10/09/13 Social Media and Food Safety.

BRANDWATCH via YOUTUBE 12/02/15 Social Media, Food, and the Passionate Consumer. Cogent Business & Management - 2016 - Social media and consumer awareness toward manufactured food. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Volume 116, Issue 9, September 2016, The Association between Social Media Use and Eating Concerns among US Young Adults.

Food Quality and Preference Volume 56, Part A, March 2017, Social media mediated interaction with peers, experts and anonymous authors: Conversation partner and message framing effects on risk perception and sense-making of organic food. Highlights The message frame used in the chat did not affect risk perception and sense-making.

Food Quality and Preference Volume 56, Part A, March 2017, Social media mediated interaction with peers, experts and anonymous authors: Conversation partner and message framing effects on risk perception and sense-making of organic food

Chatting with partners perceived to be experts decreased risk perception. Chatting with partners perceived to be similar increased sense-making. Initial attitude affected risk perception and sense-making following a chat. Attitude impacted information sharing the most when the chat partner was uncertain. Abstract With the increased popularity of organic food production, new information about the risks attached to food products has become available. Keywords. RESOURCES, CONSERVATION AND RECYCLING - 2017 - Can social media be a tool for reducing consumers' food waste? A behaviour change experiment by a UK retailer.

TRENDS IN FOOD SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY - 2013 - The use of social media in food risk and benefit communication. FOOD POLICY - 2014 - Social media as a useful tool in food risk and benefit communication? A strategic orientation approach. British Food Journal 119(3):453-467 · February 2017 The role of social media in communication about food risks: Views of journalists, food regulators and the food industry. Goodall, K., Newman, L. and Ward, P.R. (2014), “Improving access to health information for older migrants by using grounded theory and social network analysis to understand their information behaviour and digital technology use”,European Journal of Cancer Care, Vol. 23 No. 6, pp. 728-738, doi: 10.1111/ecc.12241.

British Food Journal 119(3):453-467 · February 2017 The role of social media in communication about food risks: Views of journalists, food regulators and the food industry

He, W., Zha, S. and Li, L. (2013), “Social media competitive analysis and text mining: a case study in the pizza industry”,International Journal of Information Management, Vol. 33 No. 3, pp. 464-472. Henderson, J., Coveney, J. and Ward, P. (2010), “Who regulates food? Responsibility for food safety”,Australian Journal of Primary Health, Vol. 16 No. 4, pp. 334-351. Henderson, J., Ward, P.R., Coveney, J. and Meyer, S. (2012), “Trust in the Australian food supply: innocent until proven guilty”,Health, Risk & Society, Vol. 14 No. 3, pp. 257-272. Hilgartner, S. (1990), “The dominant view of popularization: conceptual problems, political uses”,Social pp. 261-269. MANHATTAN INSTITUTE - 2016 - Restaurant Hygiene and Social Media: How to Improve Regulatory Disclosures in the Digital Age.

TECHNOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF EASTERN MACEDONIA AND THRACE - 2014 - Factors affecting consumer intention to use Internet for food shopping. JIFSAN 2016 Annual Symposium - Présentations : Communicating Food Risk in an Era of Social Media. April 4-5, 2016 Greenbelt Marriott Hotel, Greenbelt, MD, USA Click to enlarge.

JIFSAN 2016 Annual Symposium - Présentations : Communicating Food Risk in an Era of Social Media

Symposium Proceedings How do you FIRST RECEIVE scientific and food safety risk information, monitor for consumer concerns? UNIVERSITY OF APPLIED SCIENCE BONN-RHEIN-SIEG - 2015 - Web Data Mining and Social Media Analysis for better Communication in Food Safety Cris. UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA - 2014 - Does Internet Use Affect Public Perceptions Of Technologies in Livestock Production? SCIENCE COMMUNICATION - OCT 2014 - Communicating Food Safety via the Social Media - The Role of Knowledge and Emotions on Risk Perception and Prevention. The Role of Knowledge and Emotions on Risk Perception and Prevention Yi Mou, C202, Macau University of Science and Technology, Avenida Wai Long, Taipa, Macau.

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION - OCT 2014 - Communicating Food Safety via the Social Media - The Role of Knowledge and Emotions on Risk Perception and Prevention

Email: ymou@must.edu.mo Abstract This study examined the Chinese public’s use of Weibo (a microblog platform) and their cognitive, affective, and behavioral responses to a series of food safety crises. Based on a sample of 1,360 adult Weibo users across China, the study found that Weibo use contributed to cognitive and behavioral responses to food safety concerns, but access to other online and off-line news and information outlets was largely irrelevant.

Article Notes Declaration of Conflicting Interests The author(s) declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article. . © 2014 SAGE Publications. Procedia Technology 8 ( 2013 ) 200 – 208 Evaluation of Social Media Actions for the Agrifood System. Volume 8, 2013, Pages 200–208 6th International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies in Agriculture, Food and Environment (HAICTA 2013) Edited By Michail Salampasis and Alexandros Theodoridis Abstract The aim of this study is that of providing some indications about the involvement of social networks into the agrifood system, even if in Italy it has just been approached compared to other countries, a reason why we do not have relevant statistics and enough literature.

Procedia Technology 8 ( 2013 ) 200 – 208 Evaluation of Social Media Actions for the Agrifood System

Social media, in fact, may contribute to formulate the right communication strategies in the different contexts, both traditional and virtual, by understanding at first what impact social media have through “word of mouth” among consumers concerning purchase trend of other ones, including the “experience sharing” in both contexts that may affect final purchase differently. Keywords. PLOS BIOLOGY 23/04/13 An Introduction to Social Media for Scientists. Citation: Bik HM, Goldstein MC (2013) An Introduction to Social Media for Scientists.

PLOS BIOLOGY 23/04/13 An Introduction to Social Media for Scientists

PLoS Biol 11(4): e1001535. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001535 Published: April 23, 2013 Copyright: © 2013 Bik, Goldstein. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Funding: Support for the authors to attend the Science Online conference and the Deep Sea News retreat was contributed by Science Online, Georgia Aquarium, and Coral Reef Alliance. Competing interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY - 2015 - Thèse en ligne : The Exploration of Social Media as a Media Relations Tool for Agricultural Organizations. LIVE MINT 22/05/15 Maggi’s social media strategy to handle food safety concerns falls flat. Tweeting automated responses and sharing heavy text files to clarify on food safety seem like a move by someone who does not understand how Twitter works Mumbai: Brand consultants have criticized Nestle India’s clumsy damage control attempt on social media after news reports said its instant noodles brand Maggi could be banned in Uttar Pradesh following the state’s food safety department allegedly finding harmful substances in some of its samples.

LIVE MINT 22/05/15 Maggi’s social media strategy to handle food safety concerns falls flat

Tweeting automated responses and sharing heavy text files with clarifications seem like a move by someone who does not quite understand how the micro-blogging site Twitter functions, consultants said. A look at Maggi’s Twitter handle @MaggiIndia shows how it responded to angry tweets about the alleged presence of monosodium glutamate (MSG), an artificial flavour enhancer, and lead in some of its samples. Responses such as ‘We do not add MSG to MAGGI noodles. “I think they’re being advised badly. Nestle’s approach differs from that of its peers. Journal of Risk Research Volume 19, Issue 1, 2016 Risk communication and social media during food safety crises: a study of stakeholders’ opinions in Ireland. WebImagesPlus… Connexion Recherche avancée Scholar Scholar.

Journal of Risk Research Volume 19, Issue 1, 2016 Risk communication and social media during food safety crises: a study of stakeholders’ opinions in Ireland

JOURNAL OF FOOD SYSTEM DYNAMICS - 2015 - Web Data Mining and Social Media Analysis for better Communication in Food Safety Crises. Web Data Mining and Social Media Analysis for better Communication in Food Safety Crises Christian H.

JOURNAL OF FOOD SYSTEM DYNAMICS - 2015 - Web Data Mining and Social Media Analysis for better Communication in Food Safety Crises

Meyer, Martin Hamer, Wiltrud Terlau, Johannes Raithel, Patrick Pongratz Abstract. Journal of Foodservice Business Research Volume 18, Issue 2, 2015 The Effect of Social Media Comments on Consumers’ Responses to Food Safety Information. IOWA RESEARCH ONLINE - 2014 - thèse en ligne : Computational methods for mining health communications in web 2.0. Abstract Data from social media platforms are being actively mined for trends and patterns of interests.

IOWA RESEARCH ONLINE - 2014 - thèse en ligne : Computational methods for mining health communications in web 2.0

Problems such as sentiment analysis and prediction of election outcomes have become tremendously popular due to the unprecedented availability of social interactivity data of different types. In this thesis we address two problems that have been relatively unexplored. The first problem relates to mining beliefs, in particular health beliefs, and their surveillance using social media. The second problem relates to investigation of factors associated with engagement of U.S. In addressing the first problem we propose a novel computational framework for belief surveillance.

For the second problem, our specific goals are to study factors associated with the amount and duration of engagement of organizations. Keywords. FOOD SAFETY TECH 04/11/15 What Does a Social Media Crisis Communications Plan Have to Do with Food Safety? No one can contest the power of social media these days. As of August 2015, there were 2.2. billion users of social networks globally, with Facebook still by far the largest social network platform, at nearly 1.5 billion active users.

Even if you aren’t on Twitter or Instagram, you have most likely heard or read about topics on them through other media. The influence of social networks to reach so many people makes them perhaps the most powerful communications tool available. The Food Safety Consortium conference will feature sessions on social media, including “How Consumers Are Using Social Media for Food Safety”. LEARN MORE about the event, which takes place November 17-20.

FOOD SAFETY NEWS 08/08/14 How Health and Food Safety Risk Communicators Can Engage Social Media. “With the ubiquitous nature of social media in current society, health and food safety risk communicators should be taking advantage of these platforms to provide information and engage the public,” reads a recent article in the journal Perspectives in Public Health. To help health information providers navigate social media, researchers at North Carolina State University reviewed current research on its use in public health settings and suggested frameworks for developing social media strategies. The authors say it’s important for public health organizations to use sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram in a collaborative way rather a one-way broadcast of information. Some studies have found that participation in lifestyle interventions corresponds with the level of participation in a Facebook group.

Social media can also be useful in responding to questions, creating events such as online chats, and engaging other organizations. FOOD SAFETY MAGAZINE - FEB/MARCH 2014 - The Tweeters of Doom: How Social Media Impacts Food Safety and Risk Communication. COVER STORY | February/March 2014 By Matt Raymond & Anthony Flood “It takes 20 years to build a reputation and 5 minutes to ruin it.

If you think about that, you’ll do things differently.” —Warren Buffett What began with a belly-ache soon would become the mother of all PR headaches. It started on Christmas Eve in 1992 when 6-year-old Lauren Rudolph, exhibiting many of the symptoms of intestinal flu, was taken to a San Diego emergency room. Soon it became clear that it was much more serious than a garden-variety stomach bug.

As doctors puzzled over the cause of her illness, Lauren’s condition quickly deteriorated. And then within just 3 days, little Lauren was dead. EUFIC 12/08/14 Is social media a potential resource for communicating food risk information? Research from the EU-funded FoodRisC project into the most effective methods to communicate food risks and safety, has revealed the value of complimenting the use of traditional communication channels with social media.

This study, carried out by researchers from across Europe, assessed whether European consumers already familiar with social media use it to seek information on food-related risks. Results show that risk information can be provided on social media alongside other information resources, but that it should not be considered as a substitute. There are various means for the public to obtain information on food risk information, including offline media such as television and newspapers, and online resources such as search engines and the websites of trusted organisations. COGENT BUSINESS & MANAGEMENT - 2015 - Fall and redemption: Monitoring and engaging in social media conversations during a crisis. WebImagesPlus… Connexion Recherche avancée Scholar Scholar [HTML] à partir de tandfonline.comtandfonline.com [HTML] Chinese Journal of Communication 18/11/15 Risk perception of food safety issue on social media.

BMC Public Health. 2015; 15: 822. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of food safety education interventions for consumers in developed countries. Environmental Public Health 09/03/14 The use of social media in environmental health research and communication: an evidence review. CARDIFF UNIVERSITY 07/08/14 Discovering the impact of the horse meat scandal using social media.

Skip to content Skip to navigation menu Cymraeg. SOCIAL SCIENCE COMPUTER REVIEW - OCT 2014 - Social Media Risks and Benefits - A Public Sector Perspective. A Public Sector Perspective Abstract. The 2 554 nd International Research Symposium in Service Management Yogyakarta, INDONESIA, 26 – 30 July 2011 The Effect of Risk Perception on the Usage of Social Network Sites: a Conceptual Model and Research Propositions.

Perspectives in Public Health July 2014 vol. 134 no. 4 225-230 Potential of social media as a tool to combat foodborne illness. Benjamin Chapman Benjamin Raymond Douglas Powell Benjamin Chapman, Department of Youth, Family, & Community Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA Email: benjamin_chapman@ncsu.edu Abstract The use of social media platforms, such as Facebook and Twitter, has been increasing substantially in recent years and has affected the way that people access information online. FOOD INSIGHT 02/05/14 The Tweeters of Doom: How Social Media Impact Food Safety and Risk Communication - Part I of II.

OCDE - 2013 - The Use of Social Media in Risk and Crisis Communication. FOOD SAFETY MAGAZINE - FEV / MARS 2014 - From One Tweet to a Full-Blown Crisis: Social Media Crisis Management. CRISIS MANAGEMENT | February/March 2014 By Dan Webber It’s hard to believe, but it’s been less than a decade since the first Tweet was sent. In that time, social media platforms have rapidly evolved to become a central way to gather, create and share information.

The Pew Center’s Internet & American Life Project[1] estimates that 72 percent of U.S. adult online users are connected to at least one social media platform. These numbers further reveal that people now increasingly look to social media as a primary channel for news, information and updates. When a crisis occurs, the new norm is to turn to our mobile devices—never more than a few feet from us—to look for information, broadcast feelings, spread images and connect with one another around common experiences. REFRIGERATED & FROZEN FOODS 08/07/14 How to Respond to a Food Crisis via Social Media. It’s 9:29 a.m. on a Thursday, and a woman named Becky in Lebanon, Kan., just posted a photo on Facebook of her sick 4-year-old daughter.

Nobody is sure what the problem is. The symptoms are odd and it’s not getting better despite the doctor’s best efforts. They’re hoping the lab results will shed some light on this unusual illness. Later that night, Becky heard from several other moms in the area via Facebook that their children are having similar symptoms. FOOD DRIVE 10/04/14 Truthful transparency: How social media can help during times of crisis.

Top professionals gathered to discuss trends in the food safety industry at the Food Safety Summit in Baltimore on Wednesday. WARC 06/11/13 Fast food marketing targets social media. FOOD PROCESSING - 2014 - Infographic: Social Media Marketing and Food Brands. ALLIANCE FOR USEFUL EVIDENCE - SEPT 2013 - Social media and public policy. HACCP EUROPA 05/08/14 Researchers Develop Food Safety Social Media Guide. Researchers have developed guidelines on how to use social media to communicate effectively about food safety to help protect public health. Photo credit: Dani Pearce To help protect public health, researchers from North Carolina State University have developed guidelines on how to use social media to communicate effectively about food safety.

“In a crisis context, the framework can be used by health officials, businesses or trade organizations affected by foodborne illness to help them reach key audiences with information that could be used to reduce the risk of foodborne illness,” says Dr. Ben Chapman, an associate professor at NC State whose research focuses on food safety and lead author of the paper outlining the guidance.

Key audiences may include consumers, the food service industry, and corporate or government decision makers, among others. “The literature shows us that simply pushing out information isn’t an effective way to change people’s behavior,” Chapman says. UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER - nEmesis: Which Restaurants Should You Avoid Today? FOOD POISON JOURNAL 07/08/13 Tracking Twitter may enhance monitoring of food safety at restaurants.

A new system could tell you how likely it is for you to become ill if you visit a particular restaurant by ‘listening’ to the tweets from other restaurant patrons. The University of Rochester researchers say their system, nEmesis, can help people make more informed decisions, and it also has the potential to complement traditional public health methods for monitoring food safety, such as restaurant inspections. DVM 03/11/14 What veterinarians think about social media: An infographic.