background preloader

Actualité MAI/JUIN 2014 Bilharziose en Corse

Facebook Twitter

Revue d'Épidémiologie et de Santé Publique Volume 64, Supplement 4, September 2016, Investigation d’un cluster de cas de bilharziose urogénitale contaminés en 2013 dans la rivière Cavu, Corse. <div pearltreesdevid="PTD283" role="alert" class="alert-message-container"><div pearltreesdevid="PTD284" aria-hidden="true" class="alert-message-body"><span pearltreesdevid="PTD285" style="display: inline-block;" class="Icon IconAlert"><svg pearltreesDevId="PTD286" style="width: 100%; height: 100%;" width="24" height="24" focusable="false" tabindex="-1" fill="currentColor"><path pearltreesDevId="PTD287" fill="#f80" d="M11.84 4.63c-.77.05-1.42.6-1.74 1.27-1.95 3.38-3.9 6.75-5.85 10.13-.48.83-.24 1.99.53 2.56.7.6 1.66.36 2.5.41 3.63 0 7.27.01 10.9-.01 1.13-.07 2.04-1.28 1.76-2.39-.1-.58-.56-1.02-.81-1.55-1.85-3.21-3.69-6.43-5.55-9.64-.42-.52-1.06-.83-1.74-.79z"></path><path pearltreesDevId="PTD288" d="M11 8h2v5h-2zM11 14h2v2h-2z"></path></svg></span><!

Revue d'Épidémiologie et de Santé Publique Volume 64, Supplement 4, September 2016, Investigation d’un cluster de cas de bilharziose urogénitale contaminés en 2013 dans la rivière Cavu, Corse

-- react-text: 57 -->JavaScript is disabled on your browser. Please enable JavaScript to use all the features on this page. <! -- /react-text --></div></div> L. Ramalli. A b. EUROSURVEILLANCE 07/01/16 Evidence for a permanent presence of schistosomiasis in Corsica, France, 2015. A Berry 1 2 , J Fillaux 1 3 , G Martin-Blondel 2 4 , J Boissier 5 , X Iriart 1 2 , B Marchou 4 , JF Magnaval 1 , P Delobel 2 4 + Author affiliations Citation style for this article: Berry A, Fillaux J, Martin-Blondel G, Boissier J, Iriart X, Marchou B, Magnaval JF, Delobel P.

EUROSURVEILLANCE 07/01/16 Evidence for a permanent presence of schistosomiasis in Corsica, France, 2015.

Evidence for a permanent presence of schistosomiasis in Corsica, France, 2015. Euro Surveill. 2016;21(1):pii=30100. CDC EID - Volume 22, Number 4—April 2016. Au sommaire notamment: Difficulties in Schistosomiasis Assessment, Corsica, France. Suggested citation for this article To the Editor: We would like to add some specification and clarification to the discussion regarding the diagnostics and case definitions for urinary schistosomiasis in travelers to Corsica, France (1–3).

CDC EID - Volume 22, Number 4—April 2016. Au sommaire notamment: Difficulties in Schistosomiasis Assessment, Corsica, France

Evidence for a Schistosoma haematobium infection typically depends on the detection of viable ova in the urine. However, in regard to S. haematobium infections acquired in Corsica, several ova excreted by the first 2 published case-patients (i.e., the 12-year-old boy and his father) exhibited atypical morphology (4). Therefore, we supplemented our morphologic study with a molecular study of miracidia by using cytochrome c oxydase mitochondrial DNA barcoding and the internal transcribed spacer 2 gene. The results indicated that the schistosome responsible for the infection of the first case-patient reported in Corsica was S. haematobium that had been introgressed by genes of zoonotic S. bovis through a hybridization process. Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers to Corsica, France - Volume 22, Number 1—January 2016.

Suggested citation for this article In response: We agree with Berry et al. (1) that the diagnostic standard for confirmation of urinary schistosomiasis is the identification of eggs by microscopic examination of urine, especially in patients living in endemic areas with high schistosome loads.

Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers to Corsica, France - Volume 22, Number 1—January 2016

However, this approach may not apply to travelers who have low parasite loads and in whom the diagnosis relies mainly on serologic testing (2,3). Given the very poor sensitivity of egg detection in non–schistosomiasis-endemic settings, most tropical and travel medicine clinics in Europe use conventional microscopy systematically combined with 2 different (commercial or in-house) serologic tests (2). The sensitivity of this approach (i.e., diagnosis of infection if combined ELISA and hemagglutination inhibition assay or an indirect fluorescent antibody test are positive) is >78% for chronic urinary schistosomiasis; specificity is 75%–98% when using various in-house and commercial kits (3). Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers to Corsica, France - Volume 22, Number 1—January 2016. Suggested citation for this article In Response: Regarding the comments by Berry et al. (1) on our previously published letter, we acknowledge that, in strict parasitological terms, confirmation of the diagnosis of urogenital schistosomiasis requires the identification of eggs by microscopic examination of urine.

Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers to Corsica, France - Volume 22, Number 1—January 2016

Nevertheless, we aimed at an operational case definition, providing criteria for identifying cases most likely to be true infections. We should not forget that microscopy has an unacceptably low sensitivity (2). We should also consider that currently available serologic tools are hampered by both a poor sensitivity and a poor specificity for Schistosoma haematobium (3). Regarding immunoblot, Berry et al. are correct in saying that there is not yet any formally published evidence of its accuracy for S. haematobium and that the high specificity declared, close to 100%, is based on data provided by the manufacturer. Anna Beltrame References. Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers to Corsica, France - Volume 22, Number 1—January 2016. Suggested citation for this article To the editor: As members of the French Ministry of Health Working Group on autochthonous urinary schistosomiasis, we read with interest the 2 recently published articles regarding schistosomiasis screening of travelers to Corsica, France (1,2).

Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers to Corsica, France - Volume 22, Number 1—January 2016

Surprisingly, the authors of both articles lacked evidence to support the diagnosis of schistosomiasis in most of what they referred to as confirmed cases. The diagnostic standard for confirmation of urinary schistosomiasis is identification of eggs by microscopic examination of urine samples (3–5). If this criterion were applied in both reports, only 1 patient of the 7 allegedly confirmed cases would actually be confirmed.

The low sensitivity of microscopy is well known. Altogether, these 2 studies identified only 1 patient with parasitological evidence of infection that was attributable to the already known 2013 focus in Cavu River. CDC EID – OCT 2015 – Au sommaire notamment: Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers from Italy with Possible Exposure in Corsica, France ; Suggested citation for this article To the Editor: Since 2014, many cases of urogenital schistosomiasis acquired in Corsica, France, have been described (1–4).

CDC EID – OCT 2015 – Au sommaire notamment: Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers from Italy with Possible Exposure in Corsica, France ;

The infections, which all occurred in persons who had bathed in the Cavu River in 2011 or 2013, represent the first cases of autochthonous Schistosoma haematobium infection acquired in Europe since the last reported case in Portugal in 1965 (5). In June 2014, France established a screening program for persons reporting exposure to the Cavu River during 2011–2013. By March 2015, a national surveillance journal had reported 110 autochthonous urogenital schistosomiasis cases in residents of France (6). We describe the diagnostic work-up for and clinical management of persons from Italy who reported bathing in the Cavu River at least once during 2011–2014. At least 3 months after their last exposure to the Cavu River, each participant had a filtered terminal urine sample and a serum sample tested for schistosomiasis. Anna Beltrame. CDC EID – OCT 2015 – Au sommaire notamment: Local and International Implications of Schistosomiasis Acquired in Corsica, France ;

Philippe Gautret ( , Frank P.

CDC EID – OCT 2015 – Au sommaire notamment: Local and International Implications of Schistosomiasis Acquired in Corsica, France ;

Mockenhaupt, Frank von Sonnenburg, Camilla Rothe, Michael Libman, Kristina Van De Winkel, Emmanuel Bottieau, Martin P. Grobusch, Davidson H. Hamer, Douglas H. Esposito, Philippe Parola, Patricia Schlagenhauf, and for the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network Author affiliations: Author affiliations: Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire Méditerranée Infection, Marseille, France (P. Suggested citation for this article. CDC EID - OCT 2015 - Local and International Implications of Schistosomiasis Acquired in Corsica, France.

EUROSURVEILLANCE 05/06/14 Au sommaire: Schistosoma haematobium infections acquired in Corsica, France, August 2013. A 12 year-old boy in Germany developed urinary schistosomiasis in January 2014.

EUROSURVEILLANCE 05/06/14 Au sommaire: Schistosoma haematobium infections acquired in Corsica, France, August 2013

He had bathed in rivers in south-eastern Corsica five months earlier. Before this case, human schistomiasis had not been reported on the island, although its vector, the snail Bulinus truncatus, locally transmitted the zoonotic Schistosoma bovis. The boy’s father excreted S. haematobium ova that were not viable; the boy’s three siblings had a positive serology against schistosomes. CDC EID - Volume 20, Number 12—December 2014. Au sommaire: Schistosomiasis in Cattle in Corsica, France. SOCIETE DE REANIMATION DE LANGUE FRANCAISE 05/09/14 Transmission autochtone de bilharziose en Corse du Sud. En avril 2014, un foyer de transmission autochtone de bilharziose urinaire à Schistosoma haematobium a été mis en évidence en Corse du Sud, à l’occasion du diagnostic de bilharziose urinaire chez une personne qui n’avait pas séjourné en zone d’endémie.

SOCIETE DE REANIMATION DE LANGUE FRANCAISE 05/09/14 Transmission autochtone de bilharziose en Corse du Sud

CNRS 29/08/14 Une bilharziose pas si tropicale que cela … (Corse) 29 août 2014 Du fait du réchauffement climatique et des déplacements de populations plus importants autour du globe, les aires de distribution de certaines maladies tropicales ne cessent de s’étendre. C’est le cas pour la bilharziose urinaire, due à un ver plat du genre Schistosoma qui parasite plus de 100 millions de personnes dans le monde et en tue chaque année près de 150 000. Jusque-là, cette parasitose sévissait seulement dans les régions tropicales et subtropicales.

ARS CORSE 02/07/14 FOIRE AUX QUESTIONS BILHARZIOSE - Suite à des baignades en Corse-du-Sud (Version du 02 juillet) ANSES – JUIN 2014 - NOTE d’appui scientifique et technique de l’Anses relative au signalement de cas groupés de bilharziose autochtone en Corse du Sud. ALLO DOCTEUR 14/05/14 Bilharziose : des vers parasites dans une rivière de Corse. Actualités Par La rédaction d'Allodocteurs.fr rédigé le 14 mai 2014, mis à jour le 14 mai 2014. ENVIRO2B 17/06/14 La bilharziose sévit dans une rivière de Corse. Plusieurs cas de bilharziose urogénitale ont été diagnostiqués fin avril chez des personnes s’étant baignées dans la rivière Cavu. La Direction générale de la santé (DGS) a saisi le Haut Conseil de la santé publique (HCSP) et l’Agence nationale de sécurité sanitaire de l’alimentation, de l’environnement et du travail (ANSES) pour évaluer les risques liés à cette infection et disposer de recommandations sur la conduite à tenir vis-à-vis des populations exposées.

La bilharziose urogénitale est une maladie due à l’infestation par un ver parasite (Schistosoma haematobium) présent dans l’eau douce. L’infection humaine se produit lors d’un contact diurne avec des eaux douces infestées. LE POINT 17/06/14 Corse : épidémie de bilharziose et appel au dépistage. Les personnes potentiellement exposées à la bilharziose uro-génitale après une baignade dans la rivière Cavu en Corse-du-Sud au cours des étés 2011, 2012 et 2013 sont invitées à se faire dépister grâce à une prise de sang, a indiqué lundi le ministère de la Santé. "Les personnes exposées devront consulter leur médecin traitant. Cela sans caractère d'urgence, puisque les complications ne surviennent qu'à long terme", précise le ministère en se basant sur une recommandation du Haut Conseil de la santé publique (HCSP).

Les personnes à risque de contamination sont celles ayant eu "un contact cutané même bref" avec de l'eau de la rivière Cavu "entre 2011 et 2013 sur une période allant de juin à septembre", précise le ministère. Il indique également que toute baignade ou toute immersion partielle dans cette rivière sont désormais interdites sur les communes de Conca et Zonza par arrêté préfectoral.

CORSE NET INFOS 16/06/14 Bilharziose : Baignade interdite dans le Cavu à Zonza et à Conca. La bilharziose est une maladie parasitaire tropicale très connue, 2ème après le palud, que 250 millions de personnes ont déjà contractée dans le monde. Elle est due à un ver plat, le schistosome. Ce ver a comme particularité de ne vivre que dans les eaux douces, on peut donc le trouver dans les rivières, les étangs ou les lacs mais en aucun cas dans les piscines ni dans la mer.

En effet le schistosome ne vit pas ni dans les eaux salées, ni dans les eaux polluées et préfère les eaux stagnantes d’une température autour de 23 à 25°. Si l’homme est l’hôte définitif de ce parasite, ce dernier a toutefois besoin d’un hôte intermédiaire, le bulin qui est un mollusque vivant dans les eaux douces également. Le cycle de contamination Une personne contaminée urine dans un cours d’eau où vivent des bulins, elle libère ainsi des œufs.

Cas groupés de bilharziose génito-urinaire en Corse du Sud : les recommandations de l’Anses.