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25 Things You Should Know About Narrative Point-Of-View. 1.

25 Things You Should Know About Narrative Point-Of-View

Know Thy Narrator One of the first questions you have to ask is, who the fuck is telling this story? Is intrepid space reporter Annie McMeteor telling it in her own voice? Is a narrator telling Annie’s story for her? Is the story told from a panoply of characters — or from a narrator attempting to tell the story by stitching together a quilt of multiple minds and voices?

2. You already know this but it bears repeating: first-person POV is when the story is told with the pronoun “I” (I went to the store, I like cheese, I killed a man in Reno not so much to watch him die but more because I wanted his calculator wristwatch). 3. The second-person mode uses the pronoun “you.” 4. A novel has no camera because a novel is just a big brick of words, but for the sake of delicious metaphor, let’s assume that “camera” is representative of the reader’s perspective. How to Choose the Right POV (What I Learned Writing Storming) Your novel is going to be the product of a series of important decisions.

How to Choose the Right POV (What I Learned Writing Storming)

One of the most important of those decisions is one many authors take for granted: the point of view (POV) from which the story will be told. Let me implore you right now: Don’t take POV for granted! The slapdash POV decisions you make in the beginning will literally determine the success or failure of your story. Think I’m blowing smoke? Consider this. But POV? Welcome to the eighth and final part in our month-long series of Things I Learned Writing Storming–my historical/dieselpunk novel, releasing this Friday on December 4th. How Many POVs Should You Include in Your Book? Your ability to choose the right POV for your book is actually going to come down to a series of choices. 5 Tips for Finding Point-of-View Errors — Guest: Marcy Kennedy. As we learn writing craft, we often go through various phases of learning.

5 Tips for Finding Point-of-View Errors — Guest: Marcy Kennedy

First we might need to learn about story structure, and then once we have that down, we might focus on developing three-dimensional characters. Or we might start off with needing to learn grammar and those pesky comma rules. Then once we’ve reached the expert level on that, we might need to pay attention to livening up our settings and descriptions. In short, learning the craft of writing is an ongoing project. Deep P.O.V. Part Two—Crawling Inside Your Characters. This GORGEOUS image via Flickr Creative Commons, courtesy of Aimannesse Photography Last time we talked about the history and evolution of POV (Point of View) and why certain types of POV might not be the best choice for a modern reader.

Deep P.O.V. Part Two—Crawling Inside Your Characters

We also talked about what is often called “deep POV” which, until I looked it up one day? I thought was just tight writing. Who knew it had a name? Today we’re going to dive deeper into deep POV. Wow, deep. Yes, there are style changes we can make, like removing as many tags as we can and ditching extraneous sensing and thinking words. The Fishy Flashback When we’re new writers, we often don’t understand plotting. Yet, I was dumb enough to believe that because I made As in English, that clearly I was NYTBSA material.

Um, no. And if you won’t cop to this I will because I have no pride. It’s also where we get brilliant ideas like journals and letters and coming to grips with “the past.” Thus, the past (in a vacuum) is not interesting fiction. Anyway… Kidding! Deep P.O.V. Part One—What IS It? How Do We DO It? Image via Flickr Creative Commons, courtesy of FromSandToGlass Writing is like anything else.

Deep P.O.V. Part One—What IS It? How Do We DO It?

The trends and fashions change along with the audience. For instance, Moby Dick spends an excruciatingly long time talking about whales, namely because the audience of the time probably had never seen one and never would. If we did this today? Sure, feel free to walk around in a literary gold-plated cod piece, but er… Yes, awkward.

Epics were also very popular. Also, since writers were paid by the word, their works were padded more than a freshman term paper. Recently, we talked about POV and which one might be the best for your story. You guys may or may not know that POV has changed along with communication and connectedness. With the early epics, we often had a narrator who was separate from the events. Dear Reader, come with me for a tale of AWESOME… Later, after the Dark Ages, people got out more, traveled more, etc. Which Point of View Should You Use in Your Novel? (Complete Series) - Live Write Breathe. How to Write a Novel to the End: Which Point of View Should You Use in Your Novel?

Which Point of View Should You Use in Your Novel? (Complete Series) - Live Write Breathe

Which point of view to use in your novel is one of the biggest decisions every writer faces. It’s not easy to figure out sometimes, and reading trends can make the decision even harder.